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You're a hired gun - no you don't get an equal share

Discussion in 'Band Wagon' started by Big_Bend, Feb 4, 2014.

  1. Shiro

    Shiro Tele-Meister

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    I believe he was intitled to the tip. No big though. He probably won't play with you again. Done deal.
     
  2. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Poster Extraordinaire

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    I also would like to say that I don't necessarily agree that leaders are working harder at a job than is a sideman or "hired gun". Obviously I can only speak for myself.

    More often than not these days, I'm not hired as electric guitarist or bassist, I'm hired as multi-instrumentalist. I carry more stuff. It's quite rare when I'm not the last person packing stuff away. In the cases where I do finish before others, I offer a hand to anyone else on the job that needs it. As a sideman, my job is officially over as soon as *my stuff* is put away. However, my personal policy has always been that the job is done whenever *all* the gear that allowed the music to happen, has been dealt with.

    A lot of the sideman work that I do comes up with less than ideal advance notice. In many cases there is much busting of the ass to get the material together, as well as other prep, so that the show comes off without a hitch.

    Some of the singer-songwriter types that I work with/for are not very musically literate. They're capo-happy and some of them couldn't tell you what key they're in to save their life. To their credit, most are concerned with being entertainers and engaging an audience, far more than they are concerned with good communication with a sideman on the bandstand. I get that. I'm in the entertainment business, not the musician business. Having said that, I think that some leaders believe sidemen can walk on water and don't need any help from anybody. I've been "hand watching" for decades and there's not a whole lot I can't figure out how to deal with on the fly, and very quickly. The point here being that this type of work can be mentally exhausting sometimes.

    As an integral member of a duo and a trio, I usually come off of gigs with these projects feeling a lot more relaxed. I know that material inside out and I know the idiosyncrasies of the individuals. I'm often whooped after sideman work. Work is work and I'm glad to have it. Plus I enjoy the variety of working with different folks/genres. But the sideman stuff is definitely harder work, at least for me.
     
  3. slowpinky

    slowpinky Tele-Afflicted

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    +1

    This is a far better version of the point I was trying to make earlier. I guess its horse for courses stuff - but being sidey often means a lot of work for a single gig - even if it is rewarding, the pressure of the gig is often not easily(or evenly) distributed when you are subbing. Who you are working with and the nature of the gig can make all the difference.
    I used to love diving into these things with gusto 20 years ago but these days Im alot more circumspect. Saying no is never easy -especially when you are dealing with a desperate last minute call in. But the way you are valued and respected for the role you play as a sideman both financially and personally makes a difference there.
     
  4. 1955

    1955 Doctor of Teleocity

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    Drunk in audience doesn't like band, throws bottle, hits singer in head. Should the rest of the band be hit with a bottle? They were playing "All Summer Long."
     
  5. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Neither here nor there but out here it's considered perfectly legit if the leader gets double everybody else (providing he or she takes care of all that leaderly type stuff). We call it 'leader fee'.
     
  6. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Very common here in Tx, and British Columbia too.
    Has been since the 70s.
     
  7. jbmando

    jbmando Poster Extraordinaire

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    Let's face it, if you play all summer long, eventually someone will throw a bottle at you.:cool:
     
  8. Bartholomew3

    Bartholomew3 Friend of Leo's

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    I wouldn't work with you again either. It isn't about the $$$, it's the principle.

    Didn't have to be in ratio to the number of players but something would have been nice. Like a slap in the face IMO.

    Not my concern as a hired sideman how much your expenses are - that's your problem as a business leader.

    Too cheap to make the gesture of appreciation...bye for now.
     
  9. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

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    No offense to anyone, but in my line of work, people that help me accomplish my ultimate goal of keeping my business running smoothly, and most importantly, my customers happy and wanting me again, get paid more than fairly, and if the quality is what I should be, more than that sometimes.

    That way, if and when they are needed again, and sometimes on a very short notice, they remember how they were treated/paid.

    Just my .02...
     
  10. Tommyboy

    Tommyboy Tele-Holic

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    I would have split the tip with hired gun because the tip was for a successful performance. It was NOT for how much gear you had to haul, how many hours you had to practice or how much extra work you had to do just to land the gig.

    You agreed to pay the hired gun to just come to the gig and play bass. He did exactly what you asked him to do. He should therefore receive the amount you agreed to pay him ($75) plus a share of the tip.
     
  11. sax4blues

    sax4blues Friend of Leo's

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    New Question For OP

    IF in the pre gig arrangement the hired gun would have asked about your policy on tips what would have been your answer?
     
  12. BillNeaves

    BillNeaves Tele-Meister

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    even though it's in jest, I agree with the thinking... He agreed to $75, your band agreed to $350... the tip is extra and should be split equally by all who the tip was intended for... sounds like the "band" got the tip... so all in the band should get a piece. that includes the bass player.
     
  13. BobbyB

    BobbyB Tele-Afflicted

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    +1

    As to the original post....I would explain that he agreed to $75 for the gig, apologize for not giving an even cut on the tip. Let him know he did good helping out and you will keep him in mind if the band needs help in the future. Keep the Peace Brother.
    Never burn bridges..........just sayin.
     
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