stinkey

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When i realised that you can play nearly everything on three strings. Ex xx645x is E, xx765x is A, xx444x is B. And change out x for somthing and you have colorings. But even earlier i learnd to play mostly on E, B and G strings mainly becouse we where three guitarists in the band at the time. That taught me to leave room andnot overplay (which i do to often, any way). Part of chords can be enough in a band situation. Bass and keyboard cover up a lot of sonic space.
 

Oxidao

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Great thread!
A bunch of useful screenshots stolen.

More a process-like learning, than an "Eureka" revelation, but since it's all coming so fast, I feel it like that.

This one's rushing me up lately. The neck horizontally.
Pentatonic horyzontal progression: Realizing how you can start a "Run" from any particular note, to go Major or minor, without thinking.
-major: going to the 2nd and 3rd on the same string, etc.
-minor: by jumping to the adjacent upper string two frets lower, and then following that same path up the neck.
This way you can make up a RUN on any single Fret, by playing That major scale.

Single string moves up and down the neck. At my basic theoretical level, I find taster playing notes to explore, when not following a certain spot scale pattern.
I'm mixing different modes (fixed in my head after decades of listening), even though I can('t) hardly asign them a mode name yet.

Modes, intervals, scales, chords... and how it's all related is an exciting field I've just started unraveling.

edit. It was last week playing an E Major run, when I ended up flowing to the 22th fret high E
That was magic.
 
Last edited:

nojazzhere

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Great points, Nojazzhere. When you think about it, there's really no logical reason to equate "fast" with "good". Not to mention (in the context of super-fast playing), the less time we spend on each note, the less it can be enjoyed and appreciated by the listener. Admittedly, I say this as a guy who will never be a super-fast player, and who admires and respects those who are. But after 50+ years, and to paraphrase a great acoustic player named Ed Gerhard, I'd rather make tears fall than make jaws drop.
Ed had a cool way to express things. Thanks for sharing that. ;)
 

Still Bill

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As someone who is trying to improve (and theres alot of room for it!!) just wondered what other people's 'lightbulb moments' have been re thier level of playing / understanding of guitar?

Ovbs we know theres no quick fixes but keen to hear whats brought you on most significantly?

⚡
Biggest lightbulb for me was the lesson about minor and major pentatonic scales. (use both) A minor is C major; same notes, just start on the C. In the first position in the minor you can go to the second position scale and you are in the major with the correct root note. In the key of A that would be F#, or 3 frets down from the A. There are probably some useful notes outside this combination, but this is certainly a good start.
 

BarnKat

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I've had a few:

Less notes played right > a billion notes played as fast as possible. People posting tabs on the internet have a 46% probability of being deaf or they're listening to a different song than what they submitted.
Those were my age 14sh "Ah-Ha!" Moments. In 2003 I guess.

It's been rough from there.
2019:
that maracas sound in the duosonic is a piece of solder that didn't stick.......
2016:
My 75 watt fender tube amp will remind the college kids in the townhouse next to us that thier $89 surround sound system isn't appropriate at 2am. (By playing it at noon on Saturday while they're sleeping ;) )
2010:
We don't NEED a rythm player to make money. But when your bass player bails, it's time to recruit.
2007:
If we could relocate to Mexico (grunge was big there then) we could get paying gigs every week AND have fans. But none of our gringo butts spoke Spanish or could afford gas to drive that far.....
Coulda woulda shoulda.
2004/5:
If you find a great amp nobody knows about, you should better than if you buy a good amp everyone knows about AND you have money left for another guitar or great amp nobody uses.

Recently, nothing useful. All the good stuff comes when its relevance is dampened by your lack of spare time. That's the light bulb moment of my last 5 years.[/QUOTE

PRICELESS!!! :-D
 

Oxidao

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Great thread!
A bunch of useful screenshots stolen.

More a process-like learning, than an "Eureka" revelation, but since it's all coming so fast, I feel it like that.

This one's rushing me up lately. The neck horizontally.
Pentatonic horyzontal progression: Realizing how you can start a "Run" from any particular note, to go Major or minor, without thinking.
-major: going to the 2nd and 3rd on the same string, etc.
-minor: by jumping to the adjacent upper string two frets lower, and then following that same path up the neck.
This way you can make up a RUN on any single Fret, by playing That major scale.

Single string moves up and down the neck. At my basic theoretical level, I find taster playing notes to explore, when not following a certain spot scale pattern.
I'm mixing different modes (fixed in my head after decades of listening), even though I can('t) hardly asign them a mode name yet.

Modes, intervals, scales, chords... and how it's all related is an exciting field I've just started unraveling.

edit. It was last week playing an E Major run, when I ended up flowing to the 22th fret high E
That was magic.
Lell, I mess up things. Maybe it was the 17th fret B
 

raysachs

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When I was brand spanking new to playing (I’d been trying to learn to play chords for about a week or two), somebody showed me the first position of the pentatonic scale, and suddenly, if I could stumble onto the right key, I could improvise. I remember those really early days, playing simple little 2, 3, 4 note leads to a Bob Marley album (believe it was Natty Dread). It was the most elemental thing ever, but it was music! Just by holding a note longer, or running 2-3 of them together ahead of the beat, I could make it dance a little bit. From that moment, I was totally hooked! I couldn’t even play my cowboy chords yet, but I could improvise!

Then, about 6-8 months in, I’d learned the basic barre chord positions, but didn’t know how chords related to each other at all, and someone showed and explained the I-IV-V progression to me, how nearly every great song I knew was built around that, and from then on I could play rhythm in the jams I was sitting in on and take it somewhere and interact with it, instead of just playing by rote.

Finally, someone had told me about the concept of the relative minor - how bands would sort of cop their own hits by rewriting them in the relative minor and making it sound enough like the original to sell a bunch more records. I got it, but I didn’t really understand why or how Am was the relative minor of C, Em was of G, Dm of F, etc. but then I was playing around with and started to understand major scales and the major pentatonic and it all came together. The Am pentatonic scale is EXACTLY the same as the C major, just with the root note in different places. As Em is to G major, Dm is to F, etc, etc, etc. Understanding that, seeing that on the fretboard, made it soooo much easier to figure out how to approach soloing over a given chord progression, to know what key(s) something was in.

I’d say those were just key building block moments, each making me say “AHA!”, and helped me really understand why some stuff sounded good together and other stuff didn’t - just really expanded my horizons in big gulps. I’ve never been much of a player and I’m still not, but I could make stuff sound a bit like music right from the jump, and that made it fun. That’s still sort of my approach.

Just don’t ask me to sing. I’m about 100 times better at it than I used to be, but I’m still abysmally bad. What I used to be was sooooo horribly bad sometimes I’d have to stop mid-song and collapse in laughter at just HOW bad one guy could sound…

-Ray
 

codamedia

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My biggest lightbulb moment would be when I started relating to chords or scales as numbers rather than fixed notes. All of a sudden the repetitions became much clearer because it didn't need to be in the same key for the repetition to reveal itself. Recognizing/understanding music simplified by a factor of 12 when that moment hit home because the key becomes irrelevant.

Before I get taken out of context... the key is certainly relevant when you go to play it, but not to recognize it or understand it.

When I think about it... I guess this is just "relative ear training", I just never took that formally.
 

Telenator

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1) Your band is only as good as it's weakest member.

2) Stop playing scales and start playing "ideas."

3) Take the Ionian scale and play it with a b1. Then play it with a b2. Then b3, and so on. The phasing ideas that will come to your are incredible and you'll start to hear all those "cool runs" the more accomplished guys play.
 

hnryclay

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If you can sing a melody you can play it on the guitar. Learn how to play what you hear. Theory is not "mechanical" but a way to understand your instrument and how it "speaks" with other voices. Learn the basics but constantly try to play things that challenge you, never stop learning.
 

Bill Sheehan

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When i realised that you can play nearly everything on three strings. Ex xx645x is E, xx765x is A, xx444x is B. And change out x for somthing and you have colorings. But even earlier i learnd to play mostly on E, B and G strings mainly becouse we where three guitarists in the band at the time. That taught me to leave room andnot overplay (which i do to often, any way). Part of chords can be enough in a band situation. Bass and keyboard cover up a lot of sonic space.

Ah, Stinky, another guitarist who understood that was Freddie Green (Count Basie's rhythm man, who sometimes even narrowed his rhythm part down to just one string if he felt the context called for it); so I'd say you're in good company. There is a video clip out there featuring a pretty cool jazz guitar guy named James Chirillo, where he explores Freddie Green's rhythm-playing approach, and demonstrates the "one-string rhythm" thing. Very interesting to watch! (Starts at the 6:30 mark...)

 

Dirtybluegene

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For me it was as a kid/teenager learning guitar and scales because my hippie parents wanted me to. One day I was practising a scale that happened to be in the same key as the Hendrix song that was playing in the other room and basically sounded like part of a lick in the song- Ahhhhhh right. That's why I'm learning this stuff.
The other was finding an open tuning that just fit my playing and taste, so that I pretty much only played in that tuning for years. It opened a whole new world. I'm a much better guitarist in that tuning than I am in standard.
 

yundi

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Less is more, especially when accompanying another player or singer

Learning scales without patterns, just following intervals. That is helping me to become more musical and escape from box patterns.

Playing by ear and trying to relate what I play with scales, that helps me tremendously to memorise songs.
 

Fiesta Red

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-A simple riff with a groove sounds better than a complicated riff without one.

-It doesn’t matter if I finger the chord right or wrong, as long as it sounds right.

-Just because your hero uses/used a piece of gear doesn’t mean it will sound good in your rig.

-Just because an amp has the same name as a desirable classic model doesn’t mean it will sound or perform the same…e.g., all Twin Reverbs are not created equal.
 

MyLittleEye

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A lightbulb moment happened some 20 years before I applied myself to learning the instrument. - I had a friend who decided he wanted to learn guitar and took lessons from Pete Chalmers (a notable 'celtic guitarist' of the late 80's now sadly passed) One of the first things Pete taught this friend was finger picking, right from the get-go.

In no time at all Paul was playing Mississippi John Hurt songs like he'd been doing it for years -I was seriously impressed, as were all his friends.

Seeing his progress back then is what ultimately inspired me with the confidence to jump straight in with Travis picking when I did at last pick up the guitar in 2016. I doubt I would be getting the same enjoyment as I do now if I'd come to guitar with the mindset that fingerstyle is too hard and best left to talented prodigies and put off learning it 'til I was 'good enough'
 

gazzie

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When I grasped the theory that moveing the Third and seventh on a chord or scale makes it a major or minor. When I started doing modes before I knew that all that was is starting on a different note other then the tonic. When I looked at what a pentatonic scale was only dropping two notes off of a scale.
The 3rd yes, whether flattened or not affects whether the chord is either Major or minor. The 7th being flattened or not, or not even there, is irrelevant to whether it's a major or minor chord!

ie. any chord with a flattened 3rd is a minor chord whatever the 7th is. eg Am7 or Am/maj7. Both minor chords. Or Am or Am6 (no 7th at all)

And a Major chord is a Major chord if it has a Major 3rd, it doesn't matter what the 7th is. eg A7 (or dominant 7 which is A Major with a flattened 7th) or Amaj7. Both Major chords. Or A or A6 (no 7th at all)
 

gazzie

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As someone who is trying to improve (and theres alot of room for it!!) just wondered what other people's 'lightbulb moments' have been re thier level of playing / understanding of guitar?

Ovbs we know theres no quick fixes but keen to hear whats brought you on most significantly?

⚡

Rhythm work is most of what you will do if you ever play in a band or write songs - so concentrate a proportionate amount of time on chords, especially smaller chord fragments and also your timing.

Chord tone targeting in solos. More important than scales. The realization that if you hit notes from the underlying chords during your solos you will never play a wrong note! Of course it then takes a lifetime to explore the endless combinations!

So a knowledge of where all those little chord fragments are all over the neck and what notes within them you are targeting (ie root notes, 3rds, 5ths, 6ths or whatever sounds good for your songs' genre) is really really useful.

You just join them up in a musical way and hey presto! Sounds easy but keeps you occupied for the rest of your life.

Have fun!
 




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