RobP

TDPRI Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2020
Posts
23
Age
39
Location
Derby, UK
As someone who is trying to improve (and theres alot of room for it!!) just wondered what other people's 'lightbulb moments' have been re thier level of playing / understanding of guitar?

Ovbs we know theres no quick fixes but keen to hear whats brought you on most significantly?

⚡
 

schmee

Doctor of Teleocity
Silver Supporter
Joined
Jun 2, 2003
Posts
18,096
Location
northwest
The lightbulb when bright once when I realized that scales in different positions on the neck that I was just playing from ear with little music theory or knowledge, (although shaped different), were just the same scale really.

Now all I had to do was learn those shapes in the different locations on the neck and my playing improved in leaps.
 

memorex

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Jan 14, 2015
Posts
5,166
Age
71
Location
Sweet Lorain, OH
The lightbulb moment for me was when I realized that my best playing comes from muscle memory and not anything in particular that I learned. Practicing develops the muscle memory, but in the end, when you just let go and play what your fingers remember, you play your best.
 

ReverendRevolver

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Feb 2, 2019
Posts
2,712
Location
Ohio (Nerk)
I've had a few:

Less notes played right > a billion notes played as fast as possible. People posting tabs on the internet have a 46% probability of being deaf or they're listening to a different song than what they submitted.
Those were my age 14sh "Ah-Ha!" Moments. In 2003 I guess.

It's been rough from there.
2019:
that maracas sound in the duosonic is a piece of solder that didn't stick.......
2016:
My 75 watt fender tube amp will remind the college kids in the townhouse next to us that thier $89 surround sound system isn't appropriate at 2am. (By playing it at noon on Saturday while they're sleeping ;) )
2010:
We don't NEED a rythm player to make money. But when your bass player bails, it's time to recruit.
2007:
If we could relocate to Mexico (grunge was big there then) we could get paying gigs every week AND have fans. But none of our gringo butts spoke Spanish or could afford gas to drive that far.....
Coulda woulda shoulda.
2004/5:
If you find a great amp nobody knows about, you should better than if you buy a good amp everyone knows about AND you have money left for another guitar or great amp nobody uses.

Recently, nothing useful. All the good stuff comes when its relevance is dampened by your lack of spare time. That's the light bulb moment of my last 5 years.
 

nojazzhere

Doctor of Teleocity
Ad Free Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2017
Posts
17,260
Age
70
Location
Foat Wuth, Texas
As someone who is trying to improve (and theres alot of room for it!!) just wondered what other people's 'lightbulb moments' have been re thier level of playing / understanding of guitar?

Ovbs we know theres no quick fixes but keen to hear whats brought you on most significantly?

⚡
One of many lightbulb moments for me, was when I finally comprehended I was never gonna be a "speed demon" lead player, and just trying was a failed effort. I realized I needed to focus my lines on being "musical" and melodic. I concentrated on phrasing and note "choice"....and less on "licks" and cliches. You'll never see me profiled in Guitar Player, but I hope my guitar peers will enjoy and appreciate my modest efforts.
 

McGlamRock

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Jun 1, 2010
Posts
6,919
Location
San Francisco, CA
I remember the first time I tried to improvise, it was a real eye opener. I tried to improvise over Autumn Leaves using only the Em pentatonic scale. It sounded terrible. It made me realize that I was leaning to hard on pentatonic scales for my improvising. I needed more "tools" in my "musical bag of tricks"
 

24 track

Doctor of Teleocity
Ad Free Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2014
Posts
19,137
Location
kamloops bc
I was trying to figure out how to have a series parralell switching for my strat using a 5 way switch took 3 weeks and then while driving home one night it hit me switch the ground not the hot from the pickups , got home wrote it down before i forgot it

strat wire.jpeg
 

Chiogtr4x

Doctor of Teleocity
Silver Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2007
Posts
12,997
Location
Manassas Park, VA
After 43 years I've started using the tone controls.

I played ( play) with a bass player who NEVER rolled the Tone knob on his P-Bass, up from full OFF ( bass) till we had been playing together for 10 years!
He was then in his mid 30's and has always has great deep tone ( James Jamerson, Bill Wyman, and Chas Chandler are his heroes)

One day at a gig he says " I just discovered my Tone knob on my bass!"
Heck of a blues, R&B guy - solid!
 

Chiogtr4x

Doctor of Teleocity
Silver Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2007
Posts
12,997
Location
Manassas Park, VA
Don't laugh, but I have been playing 48 years now, and have a good ear, picked up guitar from this, reading chord charts, making associations, from learning first an isolated lick or riff, then realizing you can move it, etc.
But I swear I bet I played guitar for 10 years before it really hit me, that the guitar neck just repeats itself ( of course an octave higher) above the 12th fret! Sure, I would go up there, but just followed my ear, w/o knowing where I was!

Also ( maybe in HS, just learning) I thought I invented the 12th fret harmonics, when I hit them by accident!
 

StevesBoogie

Tele-Afflicted
Ad Free Member
Joined
May 11, 2020
Posts
1,364
Location
North Carolina
Hey that's alot of tags you attached to your thread! LOL

My absolutely biggy for sure is a lightbulb moment and it's still something that I conciously try to improve.

For many years, my right picking hand and left fretting hand had their own brains. Or to be more apt, I would concentrate 100% on one or the other. Mostly right picking cuz it still sucks but getting better.

When I purposely geared my brain to make each hand be aware of each other....no joke, my playing cleaned up tremendously. I cannot say I got faster but for sure the sloppiness was noticably so much less.

This 'hands talking to each other' may come naturally to a majority of players, but for some reason, it took me a very long time to make my brain make it work in this fashion.
 

Killing Floor

Poster Extraordinaire
Silver Supporter
Joined
Feb 3, 2021
Posts
6,572
Location
Austin, TX
Musically, at least with guitar, it changed my life when I accepted that music is the sounds I want to make that I like, theory is the interpretation and communication of those sounds. I had to "let go" of some things some times, get loose to get tight if that makes sense. I try to be a proper musician, don't get me wrong, but I also think my 'swing" came out when I wasn't worried about it and I let my lessons be the boundary instead of the rails to ride on. Paraphrasing Victor Wooten, don't lose the groove to find a note.
 

loopfinding

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Jun 19, 2011
Posts
3,759
Location
europe endless
A few I guess...

there’s no reason to learn fingerings for modes on their own, just learn the parent scale and know the key of the progression/cadence. And when you get spicier, just know what color it gives to start the parent scale on different degrees of the chord (e.g. melodic minor from the fifth is 7b5 sound, melodic minor a half step up is an altered sound, etc.). it’s easier to think in blocks of substitutions than think about notes - probably the biggest one for me.

in a diatonic key playing chords you can just distill it down to subs of the I6 or diminished subs for the V7 (Barry Harris). you can do so much with diminished passing or substitution, it sounds complex but is like autopilot. likewise thinking about soloing in a diatonic key (also a Barry Harris thing), there’s “subs” for the I (iii, vi) and for the V (ii, IV, vii7b5)...basically does it have the avoid note (the 4th degree) or not?

you can create custom hexatonic scales out of two triads that can make strong melodic phrasing automatic without sounding too pattern-y. similarly, you can create pentatonic scales that are “modal” (emphasizing the character of a specific mode) using koizumi’s tetrachord theory.

learning people’s lines and practicing with records is a much faster way of getting better technically than drilling mechanical patterns with a metronome. and you can learn all the theory in the world but if you don’t do the most tedious work of getting it under your fingers, it will never come out of your head.
 
Last edited:




New Posts

Top