Young people dropping out - after college

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Big_Bend, Sep 6, 2021.

  1. Asmith

    Asmith Friend of Leo's

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    It's similar in the UK in that respect. You can choose to study a 2 year level 3 diploma at the age 16, there are even level 2 diplomas available from the age 14 at vocational colleges. But I think it's accurate that society/parents have created the illusion that the proper way to do school is to choose subjects and then get a degree. Also a 16 year old is definitely not someone I would bet on making a smart decision all on their own.

    The issue is correcting your course when you're in your in early 20s when things haven't gone to plan. I dropped out of uni when I was 20, for reasons unrelated to what's been discussed in this thread. After that getting back on track was particularly difficult, I wasn't eligible for any help with course fees be it university or vocational. I wasn't eligible for any apprenticeship due to a new government policy that was financially backing apprenticeships. I know things maybe slightly different in the US but I imagine there isn't a lot of free education available to the 20+ year olds.

    Anyway after I dropped out I was effectively stuck in a retail black hole regarding prospects and even considered trying to climb the retail ladder. But to make a long story short I managed to get myself back on track and it involved working full time hours during my first year of my new university course.

    I've mentioned it earlier but the new course is mathematics, I'm going into the final year and I am killing it. I'm not worried about job prospects afterwards because it is a field in demand and I already have work experience as a data analyst.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2021
    Matt G and telemnemonics like this.
  2. imwjl

    imwjl Doctor of Teleocity

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    I'm suggesting that not all applicants and people interested can actually do many of the good jobs that have been suggested, and not everyone with a job opening is equally competitive.

    Outside of some trades brought up we see variations of this. We've had receiving clerks retire early, quit or have to be moved around because it's not just comparing pieces of paper anymore. Delivery drivers quit or not cut it because demands of the job have grown. Main elements of our refrigeration systems can be decades old but the alarms, monitoring and control systems require new knowledge.

    It clearly varies by region but I've pointed out the employment stats that move to near 1/2 and many places into long-term natural low rates. I'm convinced some are not working simply because they lack the total of what it takes to do some of the better jobs and be successful.

    Look at it this way. Around here we used to have very simple jobs that don't exist anymore, or the current version of those jobs is much more demanding. The person who once only had to dip a cast iron part in black paint now has to have some paint expertise in that department at Home Depot or some automation expertise running the machines painting.

    Another example, when I did the modern age Ford plant tour I saw lots of jobs that were more demanding than when I was in auto plants years ago. There were fewer people who just stood and did one very simple task. Some of the simple tasks had what used to be separate QC/inspection operations as part of it. Tools were more sophisticated.

    Means and medians don't measure us as many think or misconstrue. I'm convinced these days being average is being in harder spot than in times past. For that Ford example, I used to be in a now gone GM plant that made pickups very often. I could see how there was no place for plenty of the of people who were in the pickup truck assembly plant 35-40 years prior.
     
  3. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    System interdependence has indeed gotten a bit crazy!

    At work we have 1) smoke detectors tied into 2) alarm system panels that communicate with 3) fiber optic cable phone lines that call 4) the alarm system monitoring company that ties into 5) the fire department that then has to drive to 5) the actual site and inspect for fire even when there is no fire, because: regulations. Plus the sprinkler system is tied in to the panel and technically cannot be shut off by anyone other than the Fire Dept.

    I still strongly believe that system complexity alone is not the reason young people can't or don't find jobs they actually want while need can't find carpenters plumbers and electricians when filling time comes.

    There was a time when the young folks were eager to earn good money and jumped at good trade jobs of their choice to be able to buy themselves a nice vehicle and rent a nice house or apartment.

    I suspect but can't prove that parents desire for kids to "have a better life" leading to parents paying for kids basics needs after adulthood.
    There is a clean connection between how we value what we have and how much it cost us to get it.
    Free stuff seems to have little value to many young adults who didn't sacrifice much to get it, and who know that squandering will not leave them out in the cold.
     
  4. imwjl

    imwjl Doctor of Teleocity

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    There still is a time when young folks are eager to earn good money and go for trades and good jobs - right now. Just like forever, some don't cut it. If there's a difference it might be more families accepting their own who have some struggles and troubles. That's something I believe went away closer to much of the US moving to cities and factories instead of staying on farms and during the great depression.

    Now we have so many where social media is their news. If we had news more like the 1930s - 70s we'd here someone like Walter Cronkite announce the current unemployment stats vs a bunch of arm chair director spouting off emotional crap.

    Now we do have families still aiding kids who were just out on the street when I graduated high school. It is also confirmed that a lot of younger males are not achieving same success as women but that doesn't surprise me.
     
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