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You preferences regarding a folky song's outro

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by RoscoeElegante, Jan 26, 2021.

In a folky, wistful song, fades on {X instrument} generally seem to best fit?

  1. Guitar

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Piano

    12.5%
  3. Violin/fiddle

    37.5%
  4. Mandolin

    12.5%
  5. Harmonica

    12.5%
  6. That's, like, just your opinion, man

    62.5%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    So I'm working on, for me, a very orchestral song.
    • Voice
    • Guitar
    • Piano
    • Violin/fiddle
    • Mandolin
    • Harmonica.

    It runs to about five minutes.

    The piano, fiddle/violin, and mandolin players will do line-end/chord-change fills call-and-response style. E.g., the piano does one fill. On the next fill-spot, the violin speaks, etc. At a few points, they join forces. And they each have a small solo on an instrumental section that runs through the verse, bridge, and chorus chords.

    We've even got this turn-taking and response-playing in the vocals, as the players will sing certain lines in the thrice-repeating chorus.

    All that's pretty nicely worked out. The outro, though, is giving me a bit of a headache.

    A few of our songs end with piano, or mandolin, or violin, or guitar being prominent or solo. What we don't have is one ending on just the harmonica. Also, our venue has a very nice natural reverb, giving harmonica played there an aptly haunted quality. So that's a plus for ending on the harmonica solo, with the other instruments having faded out as this harmonica begins.

    But a harmonica can be so freakin' harsh and melodramatic, especially when the song's spirit is that time and Stuff Happens can wash away a relationship and even its bittersweet memories. The harmonica can clash with this resignation-to-fading-away meaning. I can play the harmonica gently to a slow fade, but there's a risk there that, say, the mandolin, able to feather itself out so gently, doesn't quite have.

    Hence the poll. In a folky, wistful song, what fades on {X instrument} generally seem to best fit?

    Yeah, yeah, you need to hear the song first. But I'm not sharing that until it's done. Not even with this charitable crew.

    Thanks for your choice/any thoughts you wanna post here.

    Also, how the hell do real composers do it? It must take ten lives to truly orchestrate 70-some instruments for more than 15 minutes!
     
  2. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    The answer, of course, is that it depends on the sound of the letter of your last name.

    Jimmy Yancey for example ended all his compositions, no matter what key they were in, in Eb. It was his "signature," I suppose you could say. Here he is playing a tune in C. Listen to how it ends:



    Otherwise, the sky's the limit. New Orleans bands ended everything with a tutti. There used to be a "fade-out" in pop music. I mean, everything depends on the effect you want to create.

    Quick answer: violin.
     
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  3. Oldsmobum

    Oldsmobum Tele-Meister

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    Does it have to be a fade?
     
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  4. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    If I go with the harmonica, I think it does. Since the song is about eternal things in effect erasing memories. (Not that I planned it that way, but that is what it patterned out to be.)

    I like the mandolin a lot here, but a prior song in the set ends with the mandolin's lovely feathering out on the winds quality.
     
  5. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Former violin player here. Thinking of how instruments fade, it would be difficult, technique-wise, to beat the violin out of your choices.
     
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  6. Oxidao

    Oxidao TDPRI Member

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    in case the Harp last phrase fits,
    What about a short long lasting echo?
     
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  7. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    Hmmmm..... Might be the ticket!
     
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  8. Oxidao

    Oxidao TDPRI Member

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    Glad you said so.

    Fading all the instruments but the harp last phrase.
    Maybe one (or 2) pattern to get prominent, and then an abrupt echoed stop at full harp volume.

    Not that much a tradicional folk ending, but could match if it’s a vigorous song.

    Just one more idea.
    Would be nice to know how it all ends up.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2021
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  9. Oxidao

    Oxidao TDPRI Member

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    ndcaster said:
    Jimmy Yancey for example ended all his compositions, no matter what key they were in, in Eb. It was his "signature," I suppose you could say. Here he is playing a tune in C. Listen to how it ends:



    I say:
    Wau! (guau!)

    I didn’t know this guy, I love his feel and rough swing.

    And the way it ends...
    upload_2021-1-27_23-27-15.png
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2021
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