You can’t fix stupid.

schmee

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A good example of STOOOPID is the people you see stand right in front of a Bison in Yellowstone, then get gored or tossed in the air. It seems to be happening every few weeks right now...
Not to mention, with a kid at risk too...
These people are idiots.... 2nd one in 3 days...
 

effzee

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Not to mention, with a kid at risk too...
These people are idiots.... 2nd one in 3 days...
A "kid" might be stretching it. It was the daughter of a 71 year-old woman. And they weren't approaching the bison. Doesn't seem they did anything wrong.

To the OP, same stuff happens in the Alps, not sure why there are so many Texans here.

Edit: or were you referring to this story, which, yeah, kid, geeeeeeesh:

 

schmee

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A "kid" might be stretching it. It was the daughter of a 71 year-old woman. And they weren't approaching the bison. Doesn't seem they did anything wrong.

To the OP, same stuff happens in the Alps, not sure why there are so many Texans here.

Edit: or were you referring to this story, which, yeah, kid, geeeeeeesh:

Did you watch the video? Nah, they were WAY TOO CLOSE to it. You aren't supposed to even get off the road there, much less stand in front of a Bison. Well it sure looks like a kid to me, maybe 3 ft tall? The kid didn't want to go there and the stoooopid old woman tried to pull it closer. The kid was the only one there with any sense. Good thing that guy saved the kid but he got gored.
THIS video:
 
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ce24

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We were geared up pretty well for a September in Alaska. Waaaay back a fe
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w drainages.
 

rghill

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Last time I went to the Grand Canyon, saw stupid tourists first hand.

The Elk at the canyon are not afraid of the people, and will walk through the parking lot. Many people were getting very close to the animals to get that perfect picture. Elk are pretty big creatures, and the Canyon elk are well fed.

The park rangers were yelling at the tourists to give the animals some space, as they could easily get spooked and injure someone.

I am not sure why some people look at these creatures as overgrown house pets.
 

beyer160

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You can't fix Stupid but, you can make some good Money from them!
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I never had ONE of them who had the slightest idea where he was at once we got a mile away from camp.


One of the proudest moments of my childhood was on November day deer hunting with my dad when I was abut 16. It was unseasonably warm and sunny, just a gorgeous fall day. Dad evidently decided that the deer could wait, and we were going hiking. We crisscrossed old logging roads and scrambled up dry streambeds for about an hour until we got to the top of a ridge overlooking the town in the distance. Dad had grown up in the area and I imagined it was not his first time up there. After a few minutes of enjoying the scenery, he said "Would you be able to find your way back to the car if you had to?" I said I could, then described the route we'd just taken, in reverse, with references to landmarks. I guess I got it right, because he just nodded and said, "ayuh". Dad's not a very demonstrative guy, but I knew I'd passed an important test.
 

SnidelyWhiplash

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Last time I went to the Grand Canyon, saw stupid tourists first hand.

The Elk at the canyon are not afraid of the people, and will walk through the parking lot. Many people were getting very close to the animals to get that perfect picture. Elk are pretty big creatures, and the Canyon elk are well fed.

The park rangers were yelling at the tourists to give the animals some space, as they could easily get spooked and injure someone.

I am not sure why some people look at these creatures as overgrown house pets.

Because some humans aren't particularly too bright... 🤪
 

Gnometowner

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Sometimes when we drive up the Conejos River drainage or along the Rio Grande above Del Norte, we see nothing but Texas plates.

The truth is, in 50% of the state of Colorado, Texans can bumble along and nothing goes amiss. But in fairness, some folks' travels have been limited as of late and people get out of practice, with all the higher end equipment, preparation and conditioning that's been overlooked for a while by many. Colorado is mighty daunting, the extremes that can be found in a given 24 hour period and also the difference altitude makes. And now that Monsoon season is or should be here, we clearly will have lots of close calls.
I have a good friend living in Mogote on the Conejos and we like to prospect for gold below Summitville in the Alamosa drainage feeder creeks.
I have rescued clueless kids shivering with sweaty clothes on and zero outdoor skills
 

Toto'sDad

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View attachment 999578



One of the proudest moments of my childhood was on November day deer hunting with my dad when I was abut 16. It was unseasonably warm and sunny, just a gorgeous fall day. Dad evidently decided that the deer could wait, and we were going hiking. We crisscrossed old logging roads and scrambled up dry streambeds for about an hour until we got to the top of a ridge overlooking the town in the distance. Dad had grown up in the area and I imagined it was not his first time up there. After a few minutes of enjoying the scenery, he said "Would you be able to find your way back to the car if you had to?" I said I could, then described the route we'd just taken, in reverse, with references to landmarks. I guess I got it right, because he just nodded and said, "ayuh". Dad's not a very demonstrative guy, but I knew I'd passed an important test.
You did better than most. I was with a guy one time, and we went several miles to where our dogs were treed, he was an experienced hunter. When we got ready to head back to the trucks, I started off, and he said you're going the wrong way. I didn't feel like arguing, so I said, you head your way, and I'll go mine. I had gone about fifty feet when he hollered STOP, I thought maybe he was going to shoot me, but instead he said, I'm going with you just to show you you're wrong. When we got back to the truck, he said well we could have got there my way too.

To be fair, I was a night hunter, and learned to get around in the woods in darkness. The other fellow was a day hunter. It's a whole different world when you're in the dark, especially on overcast nights when there is nothing to go by, except your sense of direction.
 

Spox

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Re the perils of nature, a photographer I knew was a serious mountaineer, Everest, K2 etc. She showed me photos she had taken of helicopter rescues etc and said that what you do not see in films is the headless corpses of people who had fallen on the slopes and have been there in some cases for years.
 

trapdoor2

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Miz Diane's Uncle Bill was "one of them". On family vacations, he'd just stop the car and announce, "we're going to climb that hill". As I recall the story, they did Mt. Monadnock in flip-flops..."we all nearly died!" (the trail is only 2.3 miles). He wanted to climb Mt. Washington when he was in his 70s but was convinced to drive up. Evidently had to have his car's brakes rebuilt after a harrowing trip back down...

I used to do bicycle centuries (100mi or 100km) and was routinely given grief for carrying too much water (usually 3l, refilled at the 50mi/km stop) extra tires and tubes. I'd rather be prepared (and I was a Scout) than be sagged out. I always carried an emergency bottle of water and routinely gave it away to dehydrated bikers within a few miles of the finish.
 

getbent

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After all the time I’ve spent in the backcountry, and participating in search and rescue operations, this is sadly not surprising in the least.

The number of people that get rescued every year that shouldn’t have been out there to begin with is, well, pretty much all of them. People who know what they’re doing and go prepared rarely have problems.

I’d say “hopefully they’ve learned something”, but it’s doubtful.

in the years I lived in Colorado (10) most of the rescues and recoveries and stranded vehicles had Texas plates.

When they would be on their roofs, we tell them to put their hands over their head and nearly all would refuse or not do it... and we'd cut their seatbelts...

I don't think any were harmed.

It was amazing during hunting season how little snow would result in many crises...

Lots of nice people though and that goes a long way when you are tugging them out of the mud.

While guiding... Me: if you hear thunder or see lightning or it starts to rain, run for the rocks THEN put on your rain gear. Them: Okay. Boom. they all freeze and take off packs digging for slickers. never failed.
 

edvard

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One of the proudest moments of my childhood was on November day deer hunting with my dad when I was abut 16. It was unseasonably warm and sunny, just a gorgeous fall day. Dad evidently decided that the deer could wait, and we were going hiking. We crisscrossed old logging roads and scrambled up dry streambeds for about an hour until we got to the top of a ridge overlooking the town in the distance. Dad had grown up in the area and I imagined it was not his first time up there. After a few minutes of enjoying the scenery, he said "Would you be able to find your way back to the car if you had to?" I said I could, then described the route we'd just taken, in reverse, with references to landmarks. I guess I got it right, because he just nodded and said, "ayuh". Dad's not a very demonstrative guy, but I knew I'd passed an important test.
I never did figure out how my Dad would get us back to the truck after a long traipse through the woods looking for something he could take home to feed his family. Many times when I was a kid (6 or 7 years old) he thought he'd teach me the fine art of WhiteTail hunting and we'd light out at 0-dark-30 and get to some lonely spot on a logging road in the middle of absolutely positively nowhere that my Dad would routinely call "No-Tell-Um Creek". We'd just get out of the truck and head out on a track perpendicular to the road, wander what seemed like aimlessly until about an hour before sunset and suddenly we're back on the same logging road, only coming from the opposite direction. He'd look one way, then the other, and say "This way" and we'd trudge down the road about 5 minutes and there was the truck. That man had a built-in compass, I swear.
 




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