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would you ever go to Chernobyl?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by G-guitar, Jun 28, 2010.

  1. G-guitar

    G-guitar Tele-Meister

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    I just thought I'd ask cause a dream of mine was to always visit the nuclear disaster site.

    I think the preserved history and overall ominous tone of the place would be so cool, fun and historical

    I just wanna know you opinion and please dont say stuff like, " no way I dont wanna glow" that is soooo old. just be honest
     
  2. tiktok

    tiktok Poster Extraordinaire

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    My understanding is that you can't get close enough to really see anything of the accident site and also that there's not enough radiation to worry about for a visit to the allowed areas.
     
  3. G-guitar

    G-guitar Tele-Meister

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    Im pretty sure that you can't go into the reactor, but just being there would be so interesting you think?
     
  4. slickschoppers

    slickschoppers Tele-Holic

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    sure, I'd go. the radiation levels are pretty safe now. they do give bus tours..

    http://www.ukrcam.com/tour/tour_3.html

    there was a video a few years back about a motorcycle riding lady who's father was a scientist that drove her bike into the area and had "unlimited" access...

    Just an FYI but the whole story is a lie. she and her husband fabricated the lie. she did take a day long tour on a bus in the area. and she did ride her bike to the gates... but she was turned away. she then stole video and pictures from various sites and agencies and claimed to have personally shot the video / pictures.

    But,, back to the first question.. YEP, Ithink it would be very interesting to see.
     
  5. BritishBluesBoy

    BritishBluesBoy Former Member

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    A fun place to visit...?? I don't think that's the right way to describe the site of the world's biggest nuclear disaster.
     
  6. emu!

    emu! Poster Extraordinaire

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    With dreams like that, you don't need any nightmares.:lol:

    Seriously though, I would only go if another person went first...then after 1 year or so, I'd feel OK about it.
     
  7. jumpnblues

    jumpnblues Friend of Leo's

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    No.


    Tom
     
  8. toadman

    toadman Tele-Afflicted

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    i saw part of an interesting documentary about the wildlife that's re-establishing it's self in the area. mother nature apparently is quite resilient to such events but there is always the probability that furure generations will show signs of the effects of the disaster. wish i could remember the name of the show.
     
  9. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

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    like most historical sites, the impact of the visit is affected by how much you know about what took place. The more you read about Chernobyl the more awful it really is. I think visiting Auschwitz is a very valuable experience, but the scope of how awful it really is is as much object lesson to our inhumanity as it is an interesting historical site.

    The site is a grim reminder of how brutal people can be to each other and how little value some regimes give to human life.

    I'd like to visit, late in life, to pay my respects to the souls who were lost and sacrificed there senselessly. There are some terrific documentaries on the subject that really unearth what was done there and how they approached mitigating the disaster.

    Not too far from you is the city of Petersburg, Va. You should go see the crater some time (after reading the whole history of it.) it is a pretty brutal site and a testament to man's brutality to man.
     
  10. Brad Pittiful

    Brad Pittiful Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    no need for me to go...im satisfied seeing pictures
     
  11. Omiewise65

    Omiewise65 Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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  12. Big John

    Big John RIP

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    I was living in Oslo when it happened so thats waaaay close enough thank you !!
     
  13. tap4154

    tap4154 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Chernobyl was a bad, un-contained Soviet design that helped stop new reactors being built in America.

    Not only a disaster to those that suffered from it's failure, but to America as well.
     
  14. cj11l

    cj11l Tele-Meister

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    Ever see the show " destination truth " on sci-fi channel? They went there and did some investigation type stuff pertaining to spirits and such. They all had radiation suits on. If I remember correctly they had to go thru a few different check points. The place was deserted though. Spooky!
     
  15. middy

    middy Friend of Leo's

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    No. It might be interesting, but I can think of dozens of more interesting places I'd rather visit.
     
  16. kp8

    kp8 Friend of Leo's

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    We talk about that disaster in the past tense, but I once saw a documentary about the Sarcophagus and how precarious that structure is. If that structure collapses further it would be horrible. I wonder what the present condition of that containment structure is presently.
     
  17. twangking

    twangking Tele-Afflicted

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    I've been to Auschwitz a few times but I don't think I'd go to Chernobyl.
     
  18. kp8

    kp8 Friend of Leo's

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    also close is Centralia, Pennsylvania (admittedly a different ball of wax)
     
  19. jefrs

    jefrs Doctor of Teleocity

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    It was the 1979 Three Mile Island (TMI-2) meltdown that stopped development. Over half, 12 out of the world's 19 reactor accidents have been in the USA.

    USA 12 (1961, 1979, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1987, 1989, 1996, 1996, 2002, 2010)
    Japan 2 (1999 & 2004)
    East Germany 1 (Greifswald 1989)
    Germany 1 (Hamm-Uentrop 1986)
    Ukraine 1 (Chernobyl 1986)
    Czechoslovakia 1 (Jaslovske Bohunice 1977)
    UK 1 (Windscale 1957)
     
  20. brewwagon

    brewwagon Poster Extraordinaire

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    [​IMG]

    The Chernobyl disaster was a nuclear reactor accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine, then part of the Soviet Union. It is considered to be the worst nuclear power plant disaster in history and the only level 7 instance on the International Nuclear Event Scale. It resulted in a severe release of radioactivity into the environment following a massive power excursion which destroyed the reactor. Two people died in the initial steam explosion, but most deaths from the accident were attributed to radiation.

    On 26 April 1986 01:23:45 a.m. (UTC+3) reactor number four at the Chernobyl plant, near Pripyat in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, exploded. Further explosions and the resulting fire sent a plume of highly radioactive fallout into the atmosphere and over an extensive geographical area. Four hundred times more fallout was released than had been by the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.

    The plume drifted over extensive parts of the western Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, Western Europe, Northern Europe, and eastern North America, with light nuclear rain falling as far as Ireland. Large areas in Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia were badly contaminated, resulting in the evacuation and resettlement of over 336,000 people. According to official post-Soviet data, about 60% of the radioactive fallout landed in Belarus.



    whats the matter with wind sun and water ?

    http://archive.greenpeace.org/comms/no.nukes/nenstcc.html

    "The nuclear industry's disingenuous claims to a role in alleviating climate change must be rejected for what they are: dangerous and self-serving fantasies which would create a serious legacy of deadly radioactive waste, increase the risks of catastrophic nuclear accidents and also vastly increase the threat of nuclear weapons proliferation."




    thats alright one can always store the leftover crap in hanford wash
     
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