Would this be usable wood?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by zorgzorg2, Sep 6, 2017.

  1. zorgzorg2

    zorgzorg2 Tele-Meister

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    Hi all,
    A construction site nearby seemed to have two scrap pieces of wood lying around, so I asked and got to take them home :)

    The small piece is about 14cm thick, wide enough to hold two body blanks, but missing 5mm in heightfor the telecaster pattern i have...

    But my biggest concern is the stability of this wood. It seems to be laminated spruce, build for holding the roof of the building, so it should be fine, right ? The end grain show almost entire trees are glued in there...

    Then how do I go about splitting this in half along the thickness without a band saw? Would I work with a regular hand saw if I cut grooves with a circular saw with a guide first?

    Thanks for any comments on this!
    Martin
     

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  2. Meteorman

    Meteorman Tele-Holic

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    Resawing those with a handsaw?
    Are you a patient, careful and determined person? If so, it can be done.
    I wouldn't take it on myself tho!
     
  3. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    It should be extremely stable because of all the laminations--the tendency of one piece of wood to move in one direction is ideally countered by another piece of wood.

    Splitting it with chisels would be impossible I think, because of all the laminations. I would not go near it with a circular saw--no way, do not do. There's just no stable surface for the saw to ride along. If you had a table saw maybe

    With a good hand saw and good saw skills it would be possible but as mentioned really slow. If I were determined to use hand saw I might get a good japanese pull saw. Here's a guy doing it:



    The video does not make clear ow hard it is.

    If I were you I'd find a guy with a bandsaw!
     
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  4. zorgzorg2

    zorgzorg2 Tele-Meister

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    Ok, I'll find a band saw.
    Re stability, it should be safe to cut directly to right thickness then, it shouldn't warp right?
     
  5. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I would not assume the resawn slabs will not warp just because they are multiple pieces.
    The center of the tree will warp and also separate as it dries.
    Huge laminated beams are not dried like furniture or guitar making lumber.
    Building houses is easier with green wood than very dry wood, because it's less likely to split when nails are driven.
    Since it's free it's worth a try, but your labor has some value.
     
  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    You wouldn't be the first person to handsaw a piece of wood in half for a body. Making the cuts into the table saw is one way of preparing a board for resawing on a bandsaw too. It'll be some work but with a sharp hand saw and some muscle power, you probably can get it done before you locate the bandsaw...:).

    Let the wood acclimate to see if it moves around and try to determine the moisture content of the wood. If it is too high, I'd set it away to dry and find some dry wood to use.


    Personally, I'd keep looking for wood that is some easier to deal with, that contains fewer pieces in it, assuming that material cost isn't an issue.
     
  7. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    I think it will probably be stable if you resaw it, but it's also worth considering the point guitarbuilder is making. You can make a tele out of any wood. People make nice guitars out of all sorts of stuff. I've used construction pine myself.

    But the whole experience will be more rewarding if you do it with a nice piece of wood. What do I mean by "nice?" Well that depends on your final goal. Are you going to paint it a solid color, or do you want the grain to be visible? Does it have attractive grain? What kind of finish are you imagining? If its spruce it will probably need a good bit of filler if you want a dead level finish compared to say Alder. Also is the wood easily workable? Spruce is pretty soft, so as you work it will easily dent, and you'll need to be careful and probably steam out a lot of dents. Knots are often a pain in the butt to deal with.

    So just consider the final result you have in mind. It's much more fun to work with a piece of wood that aligns with your final goal. Alternatively, you can adjust your final goal to match the material you have.
     
  8. zorgzorg2

    zorgzorg2 Tele-Meister

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    Hmmm, good points, thanks! I will let it dry a few months then before I do anything with it.
     
  9. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    Something you may need to consider.. Construction lumber, even laminated beams are rarely made from dried lumber... This before you begin with such a task, check the moisture content... It should be less than 10% to be considered as useable...

    Letting it dry a few months will not be longenough, typically it takes about 1 year per inch of thickness for the moisture to drop to useable levels...

    If you can find a shop with access to a kiln that will dry it for you, that can be reduced to only a few days...

    Ron Kirn
     
  10. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Start with a sharp hand saw. Think of it as going to the gym one night and you'll be fine.

    Cut the blank perimeter down so length x width is within 5mm of your eventual body template, then you will have a lot less to saw. Slice the side grooves as you are thinking with your table saw as guide lines and to reduce your hand sawing more.

    Let the wood sit several days after sawing, cut side up in a drier area (not the basement or garage). Sitting for months may not help much -- it would if you had gone out and freshly chopped a tree down. This wood was processed into a specific engineered product so it will have more than the average lumber handling done to it already (any stamps like 'Kiln' or 'HT' on it will give more assurance). Remember you are making a body not a neck so don't stress as much.

    Look up router leveling box or get a hand plane to level out your blanks (I often use a hand plane). Let them sit a few days. Trace your body blank and cut that out. Let it sit a few days. Don't wait months because as they say 'winter is coming' and you'll have less interest in working on these outside.

    I'd be tempted to cut the beam in half and make two body blanks all the way through at the same time. Most of your time you will be setting up so getting the second body made will not be that much extra. Save the pickup routes for late and you can decide what to have from each; a regular Tele SS and the other as Esquire H or something.

    .
     
  11. zorgzorg2

    zorgzorg2 Tele-Meister

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    Guys, thanks a lot for all the great advice and kind guidance ! That's why I like this forum so much :)

    I see indeed that the recommended moisture for construction lumber in Sweden seems to be 16%. So it's not really green, but it's largely over the guitar-building 10%. I don't have a moisture meter, but I'll let it sit for a while. I have another body on the way, so no rush with those.


    Sounds like a good idea to plan more before I cut anything. I like the look of stained wood, and mirror-like clear coats finish on top, so I will need to fill it. I realize that spruce is not the best to build a guitar, but I'm just getting started with my second build, so I don't want to spend to much money on body blanks. Where I live, it's not easy to buy classic guitar wood without needing to double the price because of shipping. The local HD variant only has spruce to sell, but there are a couple of carpenter shops where you can get birch for example. I worked with fingerjoint birch for my first build, and it was quite pleasant to work with.

    Regarding hand planes: I got one, but I can't seem to use it properly as I never get things straight with it. So I'm planning on building a thicknessing jig for my hand-held router. Well see how that works out :)

    Lastly about cutting, I'll see how motivated I am for a gym session then :)

    Thanks again
    Martin
     
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