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Words used by musicians & that you'd like banned

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by homesick345, May 8, 2013.

  1. BourbonSamurai

    BourbonSamurai Tele-Holic

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    This is pure fantasy, but I'd like for all musicians to quit saying self congratulatory nonsense to one another on the gig, like "You sound great tonight", etc. When the band sounds good, everybody knows it, and nobody needs to say anything. Verbal communication should be kept to concise exchanges of crucial information such as, "You're too loud/soft in my mix." or "Isn't that your wife that just walked in? Yes, she's at the bar talking to your girlfriend." etc.
     
  2. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    Oh, yes, the dreaded lick. I rarely used that word in the past. It always makes me think of a player who cannot improvise well, and who uses licks that someone showed him, he saw in TAB, and, lastly, maybe, just maybe learned from a record.

    In classical music these days, the word gesture is used all over the place. It is useful because of its generalizability. To me, a lick has a certain number of notes played in a certain order with a certain rhythm. A gesture, on the other hand, is less specific. A gesture has a pitch contour, a pattern of rhythmic density, and often vaguely models a human hand opening up, then folding back in. The pitch contour can be preserved even if you play it a major third higher, or whatever.

    When I was writing my book, I sought advice from people on this forum, as well as folks on the Blindman's Blues forum. I began by carefully laying out the difference between a lick and a gesture. What people on both forums arrived at by consensus was that gesture was the better word for what I was trying to get across in my book. However, even the ones who thought gesture was the more accurate term, they all warned me that most people would not understand what I meant. Instead, they would associate the word gesture with the passionate faces that guitarists sometimes make when particularly moved. They thought that it would scare off some potential buyers, as they didn't know what I was selling. Needless to say, it very much viewed as overly academic and faux sophisticated. My publisher was very understanding, and clever. He knew how important it was for my academic career to use gesture and not lick. For a classical music, the word lick conjures up something just tossed out there, without much thought. Now, I had always planned to follow the publisher's lead on such things, as this was something that he obviously had a lot of experience with. Finally, I asked him the obvious question, that did he think gesture was too phony and pretentious, and he said yes, quite strongly. I was still worried, though, the the university administration would view the book of licks has something just tossed together. When the book came out with a very cheesy cartoonish cover with highly comical text saying 2,000 Blues Licks That Rock, I broke into laughter, then tears, then laughter. My colleagues all sort of looked like they feel sorry for me to have spent so long and developed the different types of categories and so forth. Our university has a Dean's office where they display recent faculty books. The cartoonish 2,000 Blues Licks That Rock sitting side by side with social, psychological, and historical studies was something that just looked mega out of place. Some of my friends felt really bad for me, while others felt that at least it was honest about what it was. In the end, my colleagues and students didn't tease me about it, especially when they saw the royaltie checks come in. In academics, though, the popularity of a book is not much of a big deal. Fortunately, the fuss surrounding the book generated on my end didn't seem to matter much, everyone quickly adapted. Ultimately, my publisher was right, and it was right of me to defer to his marketing skills. His company is called an imprint, in this case, of Hal Leonard, the largest music publisher in the world. Oh well, at least I got an interesting story out of the experience.
     
  3. TwangBilly

    TwangBilly Tele-Afflicted

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    Larry F: Wow that's rough. What a conundrum,
    I'm glad it worked out for you though.
     
  4. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    The first definition of comping that I heard, in the early 70s, was that it could be short for accompaniment, but it also could be taken to mean complement. In this last sense, you are not exactly a rhythm machine, but instead popping out a partial chord here and there, most often with a secondary melody formed by the voice leading of the partial chords. But, whenever I bring this word up on this forum, I don't recall ever getting much support for it, so maybe it was a regional thing where I was at the time (Pacific Northwest).
     
  5. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    Arghh, I hate having to add on to my previous mega-posts with even more stories, but here's something interesting. Above, I complained about the title of my book, 2,000 Blues Licks That Rock! I had forgotten to include the exclamation point in my post above. Here's another thing about academic writing: exclamation points are rarely used! See how alarming it sounds? Or like I am yelling at you?! I remember reading about serialism in music (which is usually based on permutations, but indirectly, which is a story in itself). At one point, the author said something the 12! permutations of notes of the chromatic scale. For a brief period, I took this to be a criticism of permutations used in music. I soon learned, however, that 12! means 12 factorial, which equals all of the permutations of 12 elements, which can be expressed in the form 1 x 1 x 2 x 3 x 4 x 5....x 12 = some big number.
     
  6. hudpucker

    hudpucker Tele-Meister

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    Banning words?


    Nah, that's just silly.
     
  7. flathd

    flathd Poster Extraordinaire

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    "earcandy"
     
  8. renhoek

    renhoek TDPRI Member

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    And "case candy", while we're at it.
     
  9. flathd

    flathd Poster Extraordinaire

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    "dead mint"
     
  10. dwlb

    dwlb Tele-Holic

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    Since a great many early hot rods were old cars with newer, more powerful engines stuck in them – and those engines were not always made by the same company that made the original car –*is that really so offensive and idiotic a question?
     
  11. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Truly so, especially since a punched out 350 has evolved into such a wonderfully adaptable power plant for almost anything on wheels. Plus, most of the old MOPAR related super blocks are getting really scarce. Big hemis are gone and the small ones are about scouped up as well...
     
  12. Big John

    Big John RIP

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    Jeeeeeeeeeeeez !

    What a miserable bunch of kill joys you have turned into, a care free, fun thread starts life, rolling along picking up comments in the usual daft, informative TDPRI fashion but nowadays it seems you can rely on someone to bring it down and now look ! - complaining about musicians that congratulate themselves after a good gig ? - whaaaaat ??, what can be better than sharing a great gig with the guys that were right there with you ?
    Someone hates the word 'lick' ?????
    There's the endless vortex of poop that is 'tone wood' it's all in this thread isn't it ?
    Pleeeeeease TDP, get a grip, I'm happy enough chatting with TDPers at FarceBook but rather we were all here.
     
  13. telepath

    telepath Friend of Leo's

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    People are tools.

    Right tools.

    Some of us. Most of us. Some time. Or another.

    Makes the world go round.

    Don't like something someone says? Gee.. just tell them there and then.
    Have it out. Someone is right, someone maybe is not.
    Ding Ding.

    Possibly too worried about getting sued for having an opinion.. ?
    If so, time to direct your concerns in that direction.
     
  14. Capel

    Capel Tele-Holic

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    Absolutely - it's like saying a team shouldn't celebrate their superbowl win, they're getting paid to win games!!

    & a big +1 to taking to task all the curmudgeons as well Big John.


    Now for my 2c worth (& tongue in cheek) - the words I reckon should should be banned: "12 bar in A"
     
  15. BourbonSamurai

    BourbonSamurai Tele-Holic

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    I'm not a curmudgeon. I just don't think people should be lauded for doing their jobs, which presumably includes playing in key and with the appropriate feel for the song. Also, winning the superbowl is something that doesn't happen but once a year, to just one team in the whole league. What I'm talking about is the music equivalent of celebrating a first down, or pass completion. Maybe I should have qualified my statement by saying that I'm talking about gigs that pay cash money, as opposed to gigs that pay in beer or goodwill.
     
  16. BourbonSamurai

    BourbonSamurai Tele-Holic

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    Please don't take offense, my intention isn't to sound snide or curmudgeonly. I like playing for fun and beer, too. But when you're paying your rent with music, you get a little fed up with back slappers after awhile. There is no shortage of idiots that will attach themselves to your band and coast on your hard work. I know a guy that gets his friends to come to his gigs, and he lets them "sit in". What he's really doing is letting his friends, many of which are better musicians than he is, do his job for him so he can get paid to drink at the bar, and play the part of wizened professional. I've had his number for years, but I'm still amazed at the talented artists that fall for his shtick, to the fundamental and lasting detriment of their careers.
     
  17. dwlb

    dwlb Tele-Holic

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    Wow, man. Even at my day job, people compliment one another from time to time when they do something cool.
     
  18. BourbonSamurai

    BourbonSamurai Tele-Holic

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    What exactly is "cool"? If "cool" means landing a new account, or hitting a sales goal, great! If "cool" is managing to show up to work on time five days in a row, that's a different story. When I see people congratulating adequacy, I start wondering what the hell I'm wasting my time for. I want to be challenged, y'know? I'll stick with the original intent of my statement, which is to say that unwarranted hyperbole is unnecessary at best, unhealthy at worst.
     
  19. HoodieMcFoodie

    HoodieMcFoodie Telefied Ad Free Member

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    A guitarist I played with extensively in the 80's & 90's insisted on calling riffs "rifts". Everyone tried to tell him it's riff, not rift, but to this day he still calls 'em rifts.

    It drove me crazy back then and it still does to this day.
     
  20. fuzzbender

    fuzzbender Former Member

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    did it cause a great barrier between you?
     
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