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Words or phrases that hurt my ears

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by graybeard65, Feb 16, 2020.

  1. Northern Tele

    Northern Tele Tele-Meister

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    "I know, right"? Yes, I know I am right.

    "..No info at this time,the investigation involves a lot of moving parts.." It is too complicated to explain/we are hiding something.

    " Underneath their tough exterior was a heart of gold" . Really, I think they were just a jerk.

    "They would give you the shirt off their back" cringe

    "Going Forward...with that said...initiatives for a leaner, more streamlined(you're getting fired) company..
    we value...inclusive cultures...paradigm shifts...barf barf barf
     
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  2. edvard

    edvard Friend of Leo's

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    And for Pete's sake people, the things that stop your car are BRAKES, not breaks. Cheez Looweez...
     
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  3. JL_LI

    JL_LI Friend of Leo's

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    "There's something I need you to do for me." The sentence sounds innocuous enough except it's always followed by a feeling like your arm is being twisted behind your back.
     
  4. stonetone7

    stonetone7 Tele-Holic

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    “Corp. A will be partnering with Corp. B to produce Widget C.”

    Um, no. “Partner” is a noun, not a verb.
     
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  5. mexicanyella

    mexicanyella Friend of Leo's

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    I used to have a college algebra teacher who often used the word “clumbersome” to define a knotty problem. This would have driven me nuts except for the fact that he was a patient, methodical teacher and he FINALLY got through to me at that math level.

    My wife, a normally articulate English major, says “myoptic” instead of “myopic.”
     
  6. jarpat

    jarpat Tele-Holic

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  7. EspyHop

    EspyHop Tele-Holic

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    Tooken


    “Ma, I tried to get the last cart, but it was already tooken.”
     
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  8. rolandson

    rolandson Tele-Holic

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    Irregardless ...and...

    irregardless is enough for one night.
     
  9. dan1952

    dan1952 Friend of Leo's

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    Your probley right. Supposebly, anyways...
     
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  10. radiocaster

    radiocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Ibanez.
     
  11. WingedWords

    WingedWords Friend of Leo's

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    I love all these! Fascinating how the language changes and grows. Keep 'em coming.
     
  12. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    as an avid miss-speller I'm going to refrain from this thread!
     
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  13. Wrighty

    Wrighty Friend of Leo's

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    90% of the time the studio presenter says ‘and now we can talk to (add name) who is live, what’s the scene there now ?’, the person on scene’s first word is ‘well’. If it’s not it’ll be ‘so’.
    The other word that bugs me is ‘literally’ as in, ‘the building is literally on fire’, where it adds nothing to the statement and it’s bloody obvious the place is burning. How could it be on fire but not literally so?
    And, what about answering a question with It think’. If a politician is asked a definitive yes / no question I don’t much care what he thinks, I want facts!
    An airline I used to travel with would always have the same PA announcement just after touchdown. ‘Please remain seated with your seat belt securely fastened until the aircraft has come to a complete stop’. What the heck is an incomplete stop? And, finally, in the queue and the person in front says to the person behind the counter ‘can I get a flat white?’. ‘No you can’t, I’ll get it for you and you may have it’. OK, stepping off the soap box, literally going for a coffee!
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2020
  14. Wrighty

    Wrighty Friend of Leo's

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    Each to their own, I’ll try anything but wouldn’t want to be called Sally
     
  15. Wrighty

    Wrighty Friend of Leo's

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    ‘reach out to’ = contact, not necessarily in a friendly way.
     
  16. Wrighty

    Wrighty Friend of Leo's

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    ‘They’ instead if ‘he, his, she, her’.
     
  17. Fendereedo

    Fendereedo Poster Extraordinaire

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    Plays like butter.......WHAT!?!?

    Or, plays like budda.......really?
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2020
  18. guitartwonk

    guitartwonk Tele-Holic

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    It's not "different TO". It's not "different THAN". It's "different FROM". This is because one thing "differs FROM" another thing. It doesn't "differ TO" it, or "differ THAN it", does it?

    Also, learn the difference between "effect" and "affect", between "specific" and "pacific".

    Also, WTF is a "specialty". No such daft word. It's "speciality". It has two "I"s in it.

    Also (sorry folks, I'm on a roll)… why does everyone want to use "myself" all the time? Are we really so self-obsessed?

    I've heard, "John and myself went to the pub", "John and me went to the pub". Neither is right. It's "John and I..." because, if John weren't there, you'd say "I went to the pub", right? You would never say "Myself went to the pub", or "Me went to the pub".

    And then I've heard "This table belongs to John and I". What? Would you say "This table belongs to I"? No, of course not. Firstly, stop hanging round with John, because he's making you talk stupidly, and secondly, learn some proper grammar so people can understand WTF you're talking about.

    Rant over. Carry on.
     
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  19. dickey

    dickey Friend of Leo's

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    "but I'd be the first to admit that we talk like idiots sometimes."

    You mean you SPEAK like idiots sometimes.

    There are a couple vocal affectations that really bile my gizzard, and they are mostly used by females:

    When they pronounce "food" or "move" as "feeyood" or "meeoove", but pronounce it as 1 syllable. You hear it a lot in TV commercials. Sounds snotty to me.

    Or when they pronounce a word like "snow" as it would rhyme with "now".

    What drives me the most nuts? Southern accents. The southerner they are, the stupider they sound. Major turn-off on a woman.
     
  20. HoodieMcFoodie

    HoodieMcFoodie Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Nothink and somethink. No, it's nothing and something you ignorant brine shrimp.

    "I swear on my mother's grave..." - Usually the mother is not dead. It's a giveaway that the person is lying.

    The other one that gets me riled is adding "eh" to the end of a word and emphasising the normally last letter to create a new syllable. My youngest does thi-seh when she's frustrate-deh about somethin-geh. I call it the 27th letter.
     
    T-Bone likes this.
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