Wood type changes the tone of an electric guitar

Wood type changes the tone of an electric guitar

  • Yes

    Votes: 57 54.3%
  • No

    Votes: 48 45.7%

  • Total voters
    105
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ScareDe2

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To sum it up, in last polls, a majority of electors, about 60%, voted a perceivable sonic difference between different guitar finishes on acoustic guitars. But when it comes to electric/amplified instruments, the percentage has dropped considerably to only 20%.

Now the wood. Do you hear any difference?



I hear the mahogany, as expected, giving the warmest and fullest tone of the three. Even with full distortion.
 
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JL_LI

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What do you think makes the biggest difference? It ain’t the wood.
3996E6A2-DB8A-4CBD-8738-482206853344.jpeg
 

ScareDe2

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I believe the synergy of the small improvements summed together can create a much better tone. Wood type, treated finish, strings, a well adjusted instrument, tuners, bridge, all added together, and you get a guitar that is 100 to 200% better sounding than the stock version.
 

Chiogtr4x

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I may have heard just a little bit more lower mid-range or low and from the mahogany but that could be my imagination
I thought the differences were minimal

Once again a good guitar is going to sound good because of the combination of how well all the parts work together, rather than isolating one component.
A good player doesn't hurt either!

I think body weight and appearance are going to be my preferences when it comes to an electric guitar

So on a Fender, I'm going to like an ash body on a Sunburst or natural or transparent finish.

I really don't care what the wood is if there's actually a solid finish on the guitar, and I love the look of the mahogany body 69 Telecaster Thinline for example.

On acoustic guitars I definitely leaning towards Martin or Martin style Acoustics so I love the look and the sound of either Rosewood or mahogany with Spruce tops just the traditional stuff

And even there you can't generalize with with with how either Rosewood or mahogany will sound.
I've heard them sound like each other and I've heard the sound differently ,once again I still think it's a marriage of the parts
 
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PhredE

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I believe the synergy of the small improvements summed together can create a much better tone. Wood type, treated finish, strings, a well adjusted instrument, tuners, bridge, all added together, and you get a guitar that is 100 to 200% better sounding than the stock version.

Had this thread focused on solid wood acoustic guitars, i'd pretty much jump in and agree with you 100%. ..Not for an electric though. In the world of classical guitars (the type I have most experience and knowledge of/with) a new design, or innovative new material that generates 2% or 3% better sound (which, itself, is a very dubious and difficult to quantify thing..) would be considered a very big deal.

You can look at the many instruments that have all sorts of unusual and even goofy twists and re-designs of the traditional instrument to eek out small improvement here and there. Overall, if you introduce 3 or 4 small improvements and up end with a 10% better performing and sounding guitar, most classical guitarists would enthusiastically say "Build it!".

At the same time, I'd venture a guess that most electric guitar players upon hearing of the same scenario (applied to electric guitar) might say, 'so what?' Most of the innovations in electric guitar design and evolution has to do with the electronics. Wood is integral to the sound of an acoustic instrument. Not so with an electric.
 

schmee

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It's subtle for sure, but it's there.... The higher the volume, the less it matters.
You won't hear crap in a video, you have to play it, hold it, play different songs with it.
 

brookdalebill

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I think it does.
It’s not a hill I’m willing to die on, though.
I think wood type (thickness, etc.) effect for the sound of a guitar.
I have 13 electric guitars.
3 are swamp ash, 3 alder, 4 mahogany/maple, 1 mahogany plywood, 2 maple plywood.
They all sound different, they all sound great, both acoustically and electrically.
I have opinions on wood types, body dimensions, and sonic results.
I’m perfectly happy if your opinion differs.
 

Happy Enchilada

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OP:

There are literally DOZENS of threads on here discussing this SAME TOPIC.

One of the recent ones actually featured the same video you posted.

The conclusions we ALWAYS concur on are:

  • You can make a fine-sounding electric guitar starting with a toilet seat.
  • The sound the actual GUITAR produces is primarily a function of the PICKUPS, CAPS, and STRINGS.
  • Beyond that, tone comes from your FINGERS (i.e., PRACTICE), and your PEDALS.
  • Having a non-craptastic amp helps some.
  • When you're gigging in a noisy bar full of drunks in rut with an aggressive drummer and a cheap PA, none of this really freakin' matters.

Please use the search engine and seek out these previous threads before you post this again.
 

dougstrum

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I definitely think the wood makes a difference. Here are two guitars that I made at the same time, same construction and wood thickness. Both guitars have redwood tops. One has ebony fretboard and walnut back and sides, the other has rosewood board with cedar back and sides.

The cedar guitar sounded good 1st time I plugged it in. The walnut one took a year of fussing with pickups and bridge types in order to get a good sound.
That's my experience; it all seems a bit mysterious sum of parts thing~
IMG_20200621_094345570.jpg
 
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