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Wood stove experts?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by gobi_grey, Nov 15, 2020.

  1. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

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    I picked this up for 5 bucks. I figure i couldn't go wrong at that price. I know nothing about wood stoves but I've always wanted to put one in my shed/hut. Am I better off finding a new one or do you think this one will work? The door doesn't latch. Maybe I can fix that?
    20201115_152513.jpg
     
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  2. FenderLover

    FenderLover Poster Extraordinaire

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    Can't be sure but it looks serviceable. Good score. I'll be watching to learn more.
     
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  3. carpenter

    carpenter Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Gave one away last week so I would not have to carry out of my basement.
     
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  4. aging_rocker

    aging_rocker Tele-Afflicted

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    Nice! Fix the door catch and get some stove-black paint on it, she's good to go!
     
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  5. 1293

    1293 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have one at my cabin that's very similar. The door has a thumb screw to keep it closed. It isn't very efficient as most of the heat goes up the stovepipe. The cabin is about 1100 sqft so the stove (and fireplace) can't keep up when it gets cold. I have a VT Castings Defiant in my collection that I'd like to move over there.




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  6. BigBillow

    BigBillow Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    Hey..no expert here....but, if its cast iron and heavy, its worth using (and you got a great deal!).

    A good amount of the corrosion can be removed with a scotch bright and some light oil (sewing machine oil great, olive oil works in a pinch).

    When you have a stove, a lot of the heat radiates from the pipe (that goes to chimney). The thicker and longer that is, the more head dispersion you'll get.

    I really like the design on that. Art deco meets drag race! :p Some oil and light scrubbing, then use a rag to wipe the oil off.

    I bet in 30mins you can make it look really nice. BTW good on you for moving that beast. It looks heavy. I hope you get to enjoy it.

    Lastly, my dad is a cabinet maker, and he has had wood stoves like that in his workshop. As longs as its not ripping hot when you are not in the shop, risk is low. Keep an extinguisher close by, but more importantly, be smart. :)
     
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  7. dougstrum

    dougstrum Friend of Leo's

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    I have heated with wood for 40+ years, guess that makes me an expert:rolleyes:
    I tried a wood stove in the shop many years ago, and for my workshop it took too much space. I've known woodworkers with a stove in the shop, always lots of scrapsbto burn~
    Fix that door latch, put an inline damper in the flu pipe, and stack up some dry wood and you're good to go.
    $5 what a find!
     
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  8. mfguitar

    mfguitar Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I have always had a woodstove. That style of stove is not real efficient, so you will be burning quite a bit of wood. No problem if you have a source for dry seasoned firewood.
    Just make sure you install safely.
     
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  9. PhredE

    PhredE Tele-Afflicted

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    To do CYA and in the interest of safety, you might also want to check local building / residential codes before you get too far into the project.

    In my area, it is almost impossible to install a NEW (as in a new installation; not necessarily a new stove), and it is still quite difficult to replace an existing installation (did this 12 yrs ago -- was not fun). One other hint/suggestion, if you don't know about your chimney flue's condition (or size/fit/etc), you might want (or even NEED) to add a stainless steel liner all the way up to the top+extra required height.

    We cruise mostly with wood stove from about Nov-Apr (with occasional use of heat pump).

    Edit: Another handy gadget to have on hand is a moisture meter to poke into a piece of firewood to gauge it's wetness. Generally speaking, most pieces burn best about 12%-14% moisture content. Prefab firebricks are nice because you can store them inside (nice smell, no bugs, less debris, etc) and if you a batch of wood that is a little stubborn to burn, you can toss one or two of those in and kickstart the combustion if need be.
     
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  10. String Tree

    String Tree Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Nice little stove.
    That style needs about 36" from any combustible source.
    If you put up bricks on the wall, you can bring it considerably closer. Just make sure you leave a 1" clearance between the Brick and the wall behind it.
    Your Chimney will be your make or break.

    Creosote can build up from un-burned fuel.
    A gallon of that stuff puts off as many BTUs as a stick of Dynamite.
    It won't explode on you but, it can send White-Hot cinders out your chimney that can land on your roof or simply burn through your chimney.

    Make sure you build a way in to your chimney so you can clean it regularly to avoid build-up.
     
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  11. BobbyZ

    BobbyZ Doctor of Teleocity

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    Nice find!
    Heated my first house with two 55 gallon barrels welded end to end, they were a homemade fuel tank. I was 19 and broke so I got a barrel stove kit and put it on, carried down In the basement and hooked it up to the chimney.
    In retrospect it's pretty amazing I didn't burn that place down! But I grew up around wood stoves and had just enough experience and luck to get through a few Minnesota winters using that as the primary heat source. Couldn't afford to turn on the electric baseboard heat and never did.
     
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  12. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

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    Thanks for the info everyone. I've got a quonset hut on my property that I've always wanted to turn into a workshop. I can see there was once a wood stove connected so I'll probably put it there. Actually at one time, I believe back in the 40s, a young couple and their child lived in that hut. The young man died of polio and was the first polio case in the county. I've always called it my polio hut. Anyway, I'd like to finally make it my man cave/work shop.
    I'll post pics as I clean up the stove. I might just try scrubbing it down with scotch brite and some oil and see where that gets me. It doesn't have to be perfect.
     
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  13. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

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    It was heavy but I had a buddy with me (who actually talked me into getting it). I found it at an estate sale and I know the guy who runs the sales, he's a good friend of my dad. He had $25 on it but offered it to me for $5 when I came back to look at it again after my buddy talked me into it. I think he just wanted to get rid of it and he always gives me good deals anyways. Another buddy of mine has some fireproof brick backing/riser he's gonna give me so I'll see if that'll work to put around it. I need to find something to put on the floor since it's a wood floor in the hut.
     
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  14. MarkieMark

    MarkieMark Friend of Leo's

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    I wouldnt worry too much about appearances, they get "used" looking fast enough.

    First thing to know, yeah fix the door so it latches.
    But these kinds of stoves dont close and seal tight, so not only is it not very efficient, it is hard to control the rate of burn. You may find it sometimes runs hotter than you wish, and theres no real way to tamp it down.

    Study up on chimney design and safety, as well as maintenance. I run a premium multi wall insulated chimney, and pull a brush through it twice a year.
    (Hint:: plan for this in your design. It really helps if it is easy)

    As others pointed out, you need to install well away from walls, and on a fire resistant surface. Code standards are good to study.
    I installed a large hearth area with a ceramic tile surface for my woodstove.
    (I've had a few...)
    The woodstove industry has tons of info resources too.

    Lastly, maintain a clean area around the stove. Many woodstove disasters involve combustible debris build up around the stove from fire maintenance.
    Keep it picked up. (My brother lost a house to this. I am meticulous)

    Last but far from least....
    Firewood processing is a lot of hard and time consuming work.
    I have processed MANY cords of firewood.
    And even if you dont cut and split wood, acquiring, transporting, stacking etc is a Lot of work.

    But bottom line, if you just want to "take the edge off" in a space, and are vigilant about its use, that little stove will get you started.
     
  15. mtglick

    mtglick TDPRI Member

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    Just my .02, having owned one for several years as my primary heat source--we had central heating but my wife's asthma liked the stove better.

    Before you do your installation and drag it into place, check the floor of the stove with a really good flashlight, especially if it spent any time outside. Basically, a stove is a big iron bucket, and if it got rained on, that water can collect in the corners of the bottom and eventually lead to pitting or cracking, which is, well, bad. Scrub it out with a good bbq brush and a little water, get it dry, check the interior surface, and then put the light underneath and look for cracks that might not show otherwise--it's tough to get a good look directly down on some of these, the light can help.

    Concur fully on investing as much as you can on chimney design, maintenance, etc.--easier to think about it now than rip it out and do it right later. Making it easier to clean the chimney means you'll be more likely to clean the chimney. There are ways to make the stove more controllable and efficient, think about how you can trap the heat you're generating, for instance, using a layer of firebrick inside can help hold heat longer than the iron alone, you can purchase fireproof caulking for around the door (looks like rope) to control oxygen intake. Also think about how to move air around the stovepipe--putting a fan in the room pointed in its general direction can help keep a little more of the heat in the room as you move the air around from the walls. Making the room more energy efficient will help, too--heat rises and will draw air under the doors, through the windows, etc.
     
  16. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Silver Supporter

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    We run two woodstoves. The wood cookstove runs about 8 months a year. As stated above, those are not the most efficient, but they'll do a good job for a small shop. In a Quonset hit, that will just take the edge off and keep the coffee pot going, but that is usually all you need if you are kept moving in the shop. Check for cracks in all of the castings. These are the spots that can create trouble ... serious trouble, so really check. Some of the internal fireboxes of this kind of stove can be sealed and/or require firebrick in the bottom. Check to make sure if yours does or not. Again, as stated by others, invest the most in your chimney and the largest hearth you have room for. Oh, and check local regulations and insurance policies. The understand issues with creosote too.

    Otherwise, nothing better in the shop than a woodburning stove during those rainy (or snowy) winter days, so enjoy.
     
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  17. Uncle Daddy

    Uncle Daddy Tele-Afflicted

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    I had a multi-fuel stove in my apartment. One day I was burning coal, but I had closed the air intake valve too much, so the coal was cooking rather than burning. It gave off a load of gas which built up in the flue, and eventually exploded, blowing the flue out of the register plate.

    Scared the wits out of the cat! I was lucky it didn't take any brickwork out. They changed the design of the burner for later versions so the air valve couldn't be totally shut off.
     
  18. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

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    I scrubbed it down with some vegetable oil. It looks ok to me. I got a can of high temp stove paint just in case I decide to go that route.
    Mind the ugly paint in the hut. Never got around to painting it. One of these days.
    20201121_153438.jpg
     
  19. Telesavalis

    Telesavalis Friend of Leo's

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    that is a beauty!
    you should put a new coat of 'stove black' on it- the oil will burn off but stove black won't.
    also advise you put some heat shielding on the wall behind it.

    My brother heats his entire house in Kearney with a pot belly wood burner that he got from an old chicken coop. We wire brushed the gunk off of it, inside and out, and once it was all cleaned up we rubbed it down with stove black that he got at a local store. That one coat lasted several years. He also bricked veneered the wall behind it to insure that it didn't end up igniting the wall. Those stoves get very hot.
     
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  20. MarkieMark

    MarkieMark Friend of Leo's

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    I dont like what I see at all.

    Too close to the wall without a fireproof or flame resistant panel of some sort. And sitting on a bare wood floor with no fire resistant hearth of any kind. This does not meet any standard I have ever seen.
    A spark resistant base to sit it on is just common sense. Preferably generously oversized.

    And I do hope that single wall chimney pipe terminates at the ceiling into an insulated multi wall chimney system...

    And as far as the veggie oil rub down...
    Light a very small fire the first few times. VERY small. "Season" the stove until all that oil is essentially vaporized before a full on burn.

    I dont like it.
    But a long string of life experiences with wood stoves makes me a bit paranoid. When it goes bad, it can be very bad!
     
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