Winter project- danelexplorer!

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by lancashiremick, Nov 14, 2019.

  1. lancashiremick

    lancashiremick TDPRI Member

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    Many years ago whilst playing bass in our street punk band I bought a korina epiphone "popa chubby" flying v and whilst I loved it in many ways, I just couldn't get on with it , to the extent that I traded it very soon afterwards.....

    With the benefit of hindsight I now realise that I should have bought the v's spikier twin, the korina explorer and since then I've never been in a position financially to purchase a brand new guitar.

    However, I do have a shed full of rudimentary tools, a bunch of oddments of timber and sheet materials and ambition far beyond my skill level !


    In my job I'm used to machining metals to .001" with regularity but timber of all kinds seems to have a mind of its own ..

    Stay tuned here for much hilarity as I turn perfectly good materials into firewood or just maybe a playable instrument.
     
  2. lancashiremick

    lancashiremick TDPRI Member

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    15737698516004782532270730775615.jpg I hatched my plans by downloading 1:1 pdf of a 1958 explorer from a German luthier website. It took me over a week to figure out how to print this tiled in order to make a paper pattern, so we're not off to the best of starts...
     
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  3. lancashiremick

    lancashiremick TDPRI Member

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    15737700188847153196202014782950.jpg Armed with my pattern I bought some 34mm planed timber from the local DIY shed which apparently is spruce. Which is a Christmas tree. Glued it into an approximate explorer shape using gorilla glue which I found to be surprisingly good at its job. I at least tried to keep end grain joints to a minimum and tried to ensure good joints by clamping tight.
    Current state of play is that I've roughly cut it out on the bandsaw at work.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2019
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  4. Treadplatedual

    Treadplatedual Tele-Holic

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    Be careful with that gorilla glue - it may not hold together as well as titebond would.

    Otherwise, looking forward to seeing the explorer complete!!
     
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  5. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Poster Extraordinaire

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    Gorilla Glue is not much useful in guitar building in my experience. Cool looking project though
     
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  6. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Poster Extraordinaire

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    First,welcome to the forum! :) One heck of an idea for your first build and as others have suggested (an others will) I'd stick to original Titebond wood glue.Even if you use the original Masonite for the top and back you'll have much better luck with it,and at least here it's reasonably cheap compared to Gorilla glue.I'll be following ;)

    Dave
     
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  7. lancashiremick

    lancashiremick TDPRI Member

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    Thanks for the advice guys, I've found a supplier of titebond 1 in my town so I'll grab some at weekend. The gorilla glue seems to be doing the job on the framing but I will utilise titebond when I glue to top and back on. I'm confident that will tie everything together rigidly like a composite structure.

    I'm undecided as yet whether to use Masonite, plywood or mdf. I know danelectro used Masonite and that would be more true to traditional construction, however I'm more leaning towards 5mm mahogany plywood.

    I'd quite like to also bind it front and back and do a hand rubbed violin finish which is why I'm thinking plywood. Any thoughts?
     
  8. epizootics

    epizootics Tele-Meister

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    There seems to have been a flood of Gorilla Glue products hitting the UK in the last year or so...Their wood glue looks like your typical American-type yellow PVA glue, although I haven't tried it yet.

    The original Gorilla glue might actually make a better job than its PVA counterpart on the end grain joints. It is one of those areas where PVA doesn't perform well.
     
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  9. lancashiremick

    lancashiremick TDPRI Member

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    I "sized" the end grain joints first and theyre holding very well. However I will be using titebond for the remainder of the build...
     
  10. hopdybob

    hopdybob Tele-Afflicted

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    MDF is a nasty kind of 'wood' screw will not hold well, chips very fast and soaks moisture and will swell.
    Masonite is way better, and a solid plywood will hold to, but i think Masonite will be easier to give it a solid color.
    maybe you could go and find some pieces of solid parquet, i have done this with a project of mine as a top.

    seems to me it will be a fun project
     
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  11. matmosphere

    matmosphere Tele-Holic

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    Very cool idea! I built a Dano style guitar a few years back and my vote is for Masonite all the way.

    But with the caveat that it’s probably a little more work to paint than plywood. Less sanding but more priming. I think it’s also much stronger than a piece of plywood that is the same thickness.

    if I had done a little nicer job with some of the woodworking I probably would have just carefully curved the edges with my router and done a clear coat on just the Masonite with the wood frame. It looked very cool that way, but I needed to fix up a little around the neck pocket and string through holes so solid color it had to be.
     
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  12. jkingma

    jkingma Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Gorilla Glue is fine for what you did in your second photo. Now up it away and don't use it again. ;)
     
  13. lancashiremick

    lancashiremick TDPRI Member

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    Gorilla glue is now hidden away in the shed, out of sight out of mind. I'll be using titebond from here on....
     
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  14. Teletubbie

    Teletubbie TDPRI Member

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    Totally off topic but I'm a regular visitor to Cheshire as my brother [black sheep of the family, he's a bass player] lives in Goostrey.
    Looks like an interesting build, what are you going to do for the neck?
    Cheers.

    Edited 'cos I can't type.
     
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  15. Mr_Q

    Mr_Q Tele-Meister

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    Mahogany plywood will require grain filling, and the edges will be really apparent unless your binding covers them. But it'd probably be attractive.

    By violin finish, I guess you're talking about French polish. I think it's a lovely choice, I've never tried it, but a friend tells me it's a lot of work.

    Good luck, I'll be watching your progress!

    Sent from my SM-T810 using Tapatalk
     
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  16. Jmwright777

    Jmwright777 TDPRI Member

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    Interesting build, I will be following this!
     
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  17. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

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    This will be an interesting build...'looking forward to more!

    Polyurethane glue (" Gorilla " is just one brand that has it) has it's purposes, but one has to be careful with it, too. It has zero gap-filling properties...if you see foam "in" the joint, it's not a good joint. Things need to be tight. It's also moisture cured. And lastly, if you get it on your hands, you'll have black patches on your fingers until it wears off. :)

    Regardless of the glue, be careful of end-grain joints. For this build, the caps will deal with keeping things together structurally, so you shouldn't have much issue with the "frame" in the corners, especially that lower horn area, but just the same, whenever you can avoid end-grain to side-grain, that's a good thing.
     
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  18. lancashiremick

    lancashiremick TDPRI Member

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    Thanks for all the interest in the project everyone!
    It may or may not all end up as a total disaster yet but all advice is welcome....

    I'm originally from Lancashire but im a recent emigree to Cheshire and I still travel north for work each day as a jobbing engineer. Which is how I have access to my Bridgeport universal mill and my capstan lathe. And a bandsaw.

    Which is why I'm planning something slightly wacky with the neck....
     
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  19. lancashiremick

    lancashiremick TDPRI Member

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    15738364363682131522600914678074.jpg
     
  20. lancashiremick

    lancashiremick TDPRI Member

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    Right o, here goes...

    I'm planning on using a stop tailpiece and tuneomatic bridge like a 'real' explorer. I know that means one way or another I need to angle the neck by 2°.

    The neck came from an auction site for cheaps and is an "encore" brand. Here in the UK, encore is looked down upon as a beginner brand but this neck turns out to be really nice. Fingerboard is proper rosewood, it's arrow straight and the frets are level and nicely rolled. My gigging bass was an "encore coaster" , a precision clone and it was great.

    I'm just gonna blurt it out ha ha!
    I plan to source some maple and add a long tenon and shaped heel then mill a 2° angle and step into it.Then mill the neck pocket parallel and glue it in.

    It's fender scale which throws the drawing off which is why I left so much timber either side of the centre block for bridge placement.
     
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