Windows 10 vs Windows 11

11 Gauge

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The only laptop that I have that runs Windows is the general purpose one that I got back in '18. I've done a ton of dev work on it w/o any major issues, and although now I'm primarily back onsite using the customer's hardware and software, I'm still not in a hurry to go from 10 to 11.

I should probably add that I will do dev work with whatever hardware and software is provided. So I honestly don't care if it's Windows, Mac, or some Linux flavor. As long as whatever I'm building doesn't have a given issue with any particular OS, then I just get used to using any of them. And that extends to whatever version of OS they have installed on them.
 

metalicaster

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For the average user, it's mainly cosmetic at this point. The security is nice to have, too. But you could easily harden Windows 10 to the same degree if you're a hardcore luddite.
 

sudogeek

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As an old unix guy, the biggest difference is in WSL = Windows Subsystem for Linux and, to a lesser extent, PowerShell. I upgraded for more complete command line tools. Otherwise, in the WIN environment, little change.
 

Kandinskyesque

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I'm mainly just an end user so my perspective might differ from developers.

I've been using W11 pro since late last year. It's prettier.
It's got some better features than 10, seems to flow better when dealing with files. Edge is now almost as good as Firefox IMHO because the extensions no longer crash.

Downsides are a lot more privacy tweaks needed after installing, the panning on the volume tkes forever to find and the start menu is awful.
I fixed the latter by buying the Stardock add on (£7) and I've got the best part of W10 back (the start menu).

There's also a good tweak on YT if you're trying to upgrade on an older processor. Microsoft says you can't upgrade on certain machines but removing one line from the installation file fixes that barrier and it doesn't affect updates.

I've got 5 laptops at home running W11 now and the one running W10 feels wrong. but that's probably just a cosmetic based opinion. A month or two on any OS is long enough for habituation to kick in.
 

dogmeat

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I read some stuff about it and there is one thing that stood out. first off, apparently the main reason for 11 is security issues on 10... they are trying to improve security... thats good. but the thing that stood out was that all the software programs you load will have to be a Windows (something), or something Windows approves of. I got the feeling that they are trying to push all the software programs to their side of the table.... and eventually, maybe the only apps that will work would be the ones they make.
but I could be wrong
 

gkterry

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Dump windows quick. Learn Linux - there are no restrictions of the kind M$ is fond of. One day soon, Windows will be a monthly subscription and then they will be more restrictive about what one can run and on what it can be run.
 

TeleTucson

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My local IT manager told me it would be a seamless upgrade, an hour or less, very few issues reported, go ahead with confidence.

I shouldn't have listened. It took a day, but then the most serious and continuing problem, months later, is Outlook email searching.

I use email as my record keeping, and with Windows 11 my Outlook is perpetually re-indexing and I can't even find emails that came within the last week. It simply won't find them, and I have to go look for them manually when I get >100 business emails a day.

It is a total fiasco. I have tried the many "fixes" on the web for this apparently well-known problem, but they don't work.

It has seriously impacted my productivity, and confirms that MS can't even support their own product families.

If I owned their stock, I would sell, sell, sell.

Stick with Windows 10 until they don't support it. *Nothing* in Windows 11 is worth the grief I go through every day.

Oh, and if you want to know what I really think, .... 🤮
 

radiocaster

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windows-9-7870628.png
 

imwjl

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My local IT manager told me it would be a seamless upgrade, an hour or less, very few issues reported, go ahead with confidence.

I shouldn't have listened. It took a day, but then the most serious and continuing problem, months later, is Outlook email searching.

I use email as my record keeping, and with Windows 11 my Outlook is perpetually re-indexing and I can't even find emails that came within the last week. It simply won't find them, and I have to go look for them manually when I get >100 business emails a day.

It is a total fiasco. I have tried the many "fixes" on the web for this apparently well-known problem, but they don't work.

It has seriously impacted my productivity, and confirms that MS can't even support their own product families.

If I owned their stock, I would sell, sell, sell.

Stick with Windows 10 until they don't support it. *Nothing* in Windows 11 is worth the grief I go through every day.

Oh, and if you want to know what I really think, .... 🤮
Matters like that can be very frustrating but none of that is a Windows problem. As said, we do this at scale and it includes company help for our employees. Should you be open to qualified and very experienced help with this.....

The problems like this are almost always your particular software load, needing firmware updates, or a hardware problem. For Windows 10 and 11 we've re-staged 50ish computers each. There are just absolutely no problems with compatible hardware and software along with doing it all correctly.

No matter what you need a good backup strategy. With two known good backups and your resources to reinstall programs you can do a reset or reformat and start over. First get your computer's firmware updated. That's your UEFI, BIOS, NIC and chipset software. Start with the restore resources your system has and then do the v 11 upgrade.

You can certainly stick with 10 as you say but it risks some people being caught with unsupported OS when that could be avoided.

As for the stock, why would someone want to sell a profitable well run company with a dividend when it's in a dip? It looks more like a stock to hold or be watching for a discount and buy.

BTW, on occasion one's troubled upgrade can be from having malicious software the user is not aware of.
 

buster poser

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Dump windows quick. Learn Linux - there are no restrictions of the kind M$ is fond of. One day soon, Windows will be a monthly subscription and then they will be more restrictive about what one can run and on what it can be run.
Probably not talking about RHEL here. Anyhow why is implementing a subscription model the barrier to them doing this right now? They have already deprecated support for "legacy" processors and already have a very established subscription model in M365 (which, as a manager of endpoints/endpoint things is a godsend in multiple ways).

And yet you can still run Windows on current Intel, AMD, Qual. I have it running on my M1 and Intel Macs (as VMs). Hardly limited.

If you want to use Linux, that's cool, but because MS is going to become a shady corporation at some future point ain't a great reason. Horse done got out the barn and is in the next county, but that's just the way it is. Windows is far and away the most popular desktop OS (still over 90% last time I looked) and that isn't changing anytime soon.
 
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imwjl

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I read some stuff about it and there is one thing that stood out. first off, apparently the main reason for 11 is security issues on 10... they are trying to improve security... thats good. but the thing that stood out was that all the software programs you load will have to be a Windows (something), or something Windows approves of. I got the feeling that they are trying to push all the software programs to their side of the table.... and eventually, maybe the only apps that will work would be the ones they make.
but I could be wrong
Dump windows quick. Learn Linux - there are no restrictions of the kind M$ is fond of. One day soon, Windows will be a monthly subscription and then they will be more restrictive about what one can run and on what it can be run.
Encryption and the mechanisms for digitally signed software are not Microsoft controlling anything but security, privacy and management. It's tools for third party developers too. It's absurd to think Microsoft can let alone would try to make or own about every possible solution out there. With their latest desktop and server operating systems one can and often has to use all sorts of software from outside of their vetted store.

Linux can be great for some people but not for much of the general public that expects ease, compatibility and the support typically associated with commercial products. It also requires vigilance regarding security and matters a lot of regular users with limited skills don't have.

If you do your Linux management correctly those same "restrictions" of signed software are there. Android has a whole lot of "restrictions" to not be a total cess pool. Even Linux and open source has a significant commercial and subscription-based marketplace.

It's fine to not care for Microsoft and others such as Alphabet or Apple but stuff like that is a different animal that should not be confused with their tools, and the being against a firm's revenue streams never makes much sense to me when many I know that way live in a capitalist place or have a living because their employer doesn't do everything for free.
 

johnny k

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The think i don't like with 11 is that replaced the rename, cut / past lines and so on with little drawings. Nobody reads anything anymore ? Takes more time to decipher the drawing that it takes reading it.
 

suthol

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I decided when my laptop was suitable and my high-end desktop wasn't that I would live out my remaining Boomer time on 10.
As a boomer (1948) I'm hoping to live well beyond the EOS/EOL date of 2025 for Win10 so I will be doing a hardware update on the desktop and probably the laptop in the not too distant future.

I go back to various OS earlier than Win3.xx and like others have seen some absolute shockers. (CPM and proprietary DOS)

I still miss OS/2 Warp, it's a pity that MS invaded the home PC market to the depth that they did because Warp was powerful and way ahead of its time.

You could almost hear the CEO at the board meeting saying we've got to get onboard with Windows, even my kids/grandkids can use it.

I was also a fan of AIX for my midrange stuff.
 

Ironwolf

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I built a new desktop and a new server last summer in order to upgrade to 11 and 2019 respectively. I started using 11 before its official release. I have also bought a new laptop with 11 Home that I upgraded to Pro (using it now). I have had absolutely 0 issues of any sort with the workstations or server since doing the upgrades. Everything works exactly the way it should after spending about a week getting used to the UI changes. The desktop workstation has a fast 8 core Ryzen CPU with 64 gigs of RAM, so my photo and audio programs are incredibly smooth and fast. I use Win 10 daily at my job at HP, and there is no problem switching back and forth between the two systems. My Office 365 programs operate seamlessly between my 11, 10 and Android systems. My only comment is, being a luddite is not an attractive look for anyone.
 

bobio

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I have been a Linux user since the 90s when I had my own eCommerce/hosting business collocated at a facility in Ft Lauderdale. I had Raq servers which ran a modified version of Red Hat. I expanded to a larger AT&T facility and ran Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Stronghold web servers. I have run some flavor of Red Hat Linux for 30 years, from CentOS to what I run now, Fedora. Some aren't going to like this, but Linux on the DESKTOP always has been and still is an Enthusiasts OS and its market share reflects that. I am not talking about the Server or Enterprise Desktops, in both cases, those have professionals supporting them. I am talking about Linux on the Desktop for the average user. It is NEVER going to be anything more than an enthusiast's OS. Them's the breaks 🤷‍♂️

Having said that, I still run Fedora virtually and on older hardware. But, I have been a Linux enthusiast/power user for 30 years. I have a 10 year old Dell XPS 15 that was top of the line when I bought it in 2012. It is currently running Windows 10 but does not meet Windows 11 specs. When EOL for Windows 10 comes around the machine will be running Fedora. I still prefer Windows 10/11 as a daily desktop over Linux. 😉

Fedora36.png
 
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dogmeat

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It's absurd to think Microsoft can let alone would try to make or own about every possible solution out there.


not meaning to be snarky but isn't that what Apple does (mostly)? I kina thought Microsoft was going that direction. and the other bit about where you don't own (at least some of) the stuff you buy from them, you more or less "lease" it
 




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