Wild idea- stacking fretboard on guitar?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by JukeJointJunkie, Jul 14, 2021.

  1. Chiogtr4x

    Chiogtr4x Doctor of Teleocity

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    We were at an 'all used' music store ( Atomic, DC-area) a few weeks ago and there was a guitar there that literally had 2 fretboards on the neck ( with strings/tuners) literally at almost 90° angles. I guess for 2 different tunings, on the fly? So the neck shape was /_\

    You rotated the neck you wanted to play to the top ( w/pickups/body)

    Too weird and not comfy and $1K+, used- pass!
     
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  2. Boreas

    Boreas Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    If I am going to be playing Barre chords all day, I prefer a thinner neck profile. Otherwise, I prefer a little more heft. I have never heard anyone complain about having one of each!
     
  3. JukeJointJunkie

    JukeJointJunkie Tele-Meister

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    I love the Blackguard acoustic. LOL
     
  4. mtglick

    mtglick TDPRI Member

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    IMO, in terms of stacking, no. Way too complicated, and fraught with potential problems (laminate failures, dead spots, etc.) Somebody else mentioned the correct solution, though--remove the fretboard and put a thicker one on. If it were me, I'd find a suitable piece of ebony, but rosewood, cocobolo, ziricote or any of the oil-rich woods should do OK in thicker pieces.
     
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  5. Mojotron

    Mojotron Poster Extraordinaire

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    That is not a bad idea at all - if it was a neck that you were in the middle of making - I've done it on necks that I made that were a little too thin - before cutting the fret slots, it's totally doable. Here's a picture of a 12" radius Strat that I did that on prior to putting in the initial frets.

    venier_fretboard.jpg

    It's a similar approach to what Fender did on their Veneer necks from 1962–1966.

    Doing that to a fretboard that is already done and likely has a dense wood like rosewood as a fretboard would require that the wood on top match very closely the radius for the wood on the bottom (bending the thinner wood over the top of the old fretboard would likely not work in that case), and the neck would likely need to be removed, the side markers would be a bit out of position and the binding would have to be reworked or live with the sides of the old frets would show.

    Like you mentioned, it's doable, likely an interesting project - but a lot of work.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2021
  6. NoTeleBob

    NoTeleBob Tele-Afflicted

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    You could get an EPI Jr that takes humbuckers and use adapters to install Strat coils if you want single coil sounds... although it will be a 24.75 scale. You'll have to be selective to find a neck you like - some are slim D shapes.
     
  7. edvard

    edvard Friend of Leo's

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    Well, if you really want to know if it's possible and how to do it, well, it apparently is possible because somebody done do'd it and these links are record of how it was done:

    https://www.tdpri.com/threads/if-it-is-possible-to-enlarge-a-strat-neck.158684/#post1789506
    https://www.tdpri.com/threads/enlarging-a-strat-neck.166154/

    Basically, 5 layers of veneer (dude in the post used pine; you can probably find maple veneer or whatever strikes your fancy) very carefully clamped to the back of the neck with tightly-bound fabric so the pressure is even, then shaved down to a usable profile. I'm going to close my eyes and walk away now, the rest is up to you.
     
  8. pypa

    pypa Tele-Holic

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    Apologies if someone sa this already. Two issues I see:

    1) Your fretboard is radiused, so you'd have to radius the bottom of the top fretboard to match. This would be difficult.
    2) If you raise the frets up, you will have to raise up the saddles by the same amount in order to achieve the same action as you have now. Do you have enough travel for that? You could raise up the bridge, I suppose.
     
  9. stormin1155

    stormin1155 Tele-Holic

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    I have removed the fingerboard and sandwiched a 3mm piece of wood between the fingerboard and neck to give more thickness. It was on an antique acoustic that the owner has pumped all sorts of money into to keep it alive. Material had to be added to he bridge as well. On an electric, your bridge and pickup adjustment would surely have enough to compensate. Now whether a procedure like this is worth doing on your guitar is a good question. I think I'd side with everyone else in suggesting that you just get a guitar with a fatter neck.
     
  10. Bob J

    Bob J Tele-Holic

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    Try wearing gloves when you play. It will make the neck feel fatter.
     
  11. Mahogany

    Mahogany Tele-Meister

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