Why do scales matter?

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by CrashandBurn, May 6, 2019.

  1. rangercaster

    rangercaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    It's great to learn all the theory you can ... But when you are playing you are not thinking about theory ... You are playing music ...
     
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  2. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Yes, I think we are in full agreement! Sultans of Swing is a great example - it's so melodic. That would be a good goal for the OP: don't worry about shredding a flurry of notes, instead, play a new melody. I was thinking of Paul Desmond, who liked to call himself the world's slowest alto player, but he was never at a loss for ideas.

     
  3. ASATKat

    ASATKat Friend of Leo's

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    I really like the notes in between the scale.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2019
  4. Mrbob135

    Mrbob135 Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Even the ones next to the chromatic scale? :p
     
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  5. ASATKat

    ASATKat Friend of Leo's

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    So that means all notes are always available all the time, if you have the ear for such playing.
     
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  6. ASATKat

    ASATKat Friend of Leo's

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    Getting back to "what is a scale",

    A scale is a tool and should be treated as such. The purpose is to make music, melodies. So don't practice playing scales,, practice playing melodic lines using the notes from the scale.

    Julian Lage talks and demos this way of practicing a scale. This whole clinic is excellent,
    34:45 to 35:48 is the example,
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2019
  7. CrashandBurn

    CrashandBurn TDPRI Member

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    This has been very helpful to me. Thanks all for taking the time to respond and contribute. Hopefully this was as helpful to others as it is to me.
     
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  8. Jim622

    Jim622 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Thanks - I like the whole thing.
     
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  9. ASATKat

    ASATKat Friend of Leo's

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    Yeah, Julian communicates very well. Not all great players can talk well.
     
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  10. aadvark

    aadvark TDPRI Member

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    A few more thoughts, in response to all of the above.
    1. practise the scale, LA SCALA, the steps, up and down for MUSCLE MEMORY;
    2. then stop thinking "scales" and think "note collections"... ultimately in music we choose certain 'collections' and 'orderings' of pitches... the 7 note 'scales' &/or modes have served the western world quite well for a few thousand years, and the equal tempered 12 note system for a few hundred. But,
    3. there are many ways to skin a cat. :)
     
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  11. Jim622

    Jim622 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    He enjoys playing, it was a pleasure to watch. I love it every once in a while when I hit that place.
     
  12. FenderGuy53

    FenderGuy53 Poster Extraordinaire

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    This video really helped me; perhaps it may help you, too:

     
  13. aadvark

    aadvark TDPRI Member

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    Thanks for the Julian Lage clip, enjoyed it. Definitely echoes of Ted Greene!
     
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  14. kbold

    kbold Tele-Holic

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    But...Minor Pentatonic is not the blues scale.
     
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  15. Mayas caster

    Mayas caster Tele-Holic

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    Scales?
     
  16. tfarny

    tfarny Friend of Leo's

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    I think that worrying about scales really prevented me from advancing on guitar. I learned the scales, memorized the patterns, but when it came time to improv I just had absolutely no idea what to do with them. I SORT OF understood that the root note of whatever chord I was soloing over was extra-important to hit, but I didn't have a deep sense of what those were out of the various positions. In other words, thinking about the fretboard as a bunch of potential "scales" prevented me from seeing it as a bunch of "chords" with extra notes around them.

    Now that I'm seeing the fretboard as a whole bunch of potential chords it is just so much easier to choose notes that are not only musical but interesting and sometimes creative whether inside or outside of a chord shape or a scale structure. It's also far, far easier to find something simple to play when I'm not sure what to do! And the theory has started to click into place - WHY a particular note sounds good as a passing tone, or whatever, WHY that particular note is a total clam over THAT chord, if I extend HERE it will sound "country" if I extend HERE it will sound "bluesy" and so on.
     
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  17. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Those things that fall from your eyes: a-ha!
     
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  18. FenderGuy53

    FenderGuy53 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm not going to argue semantics; however, if you Google "blues scales", you will see many examples of phrases centered around the Minor Pentatonic Scales. :rolleyes:
     
  19. Jim622

    Jim622 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Plus the Flat 5th.
     
  20. kbold

    kbold Tele-Holic

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    It is semantics - I think it avoids confusion if we keep our terminology accurate.
    I concede that the blues scale is related to the minor pentatonic, but has the added flat 5th (#4th).
    So to be precise (semantic), the blues scale is related to the minor pentatonic scale.
     
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