Why do people still use Pro Tools?

Skully

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Jun 12, 2003
Posts
13,589
Location
Glamorous NoHo
Are people really using Sonar again? I'm still using an old version, but it seems like there are so many options now, even for free.

I use it. I went to look into upgrading for the first time in more than a decade, and found out that it was free. It's updated constantly -- way more than it was when it was a program you had to pay for.
 

Peegoo

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Oct 11, 2019
Posts
11,289
Location
Challenging Definitions of Sin
"Why do people still use Pro Tools?"

Because it still works for them.

Like any tool or device--you use it if it works well for your needs, or until the liabilities outweigh the benefits.

I know plenty of grownups that don't know how to properly hold and swing a hammer when driving large nails.

How-to-hold-a-hammer.jpg


I currently use Garageband.

But it is CRAP at driving nails.
 

Ed Driscoll

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Posts
1,922
Location
South of Dallas
I use it. I went to look into upgrading for the first time in more than a decade, and found out that it was free. It's updated constantly -- way more than it was when it was a program you had to pay for.

I still use Sonar (err, sorry, it’s now back to Cakewalk in its free version), mostly because I know my way around the program, and don’t want to start from scratch learning a new DAW.

"Why do people still use Pro Tools?"

Because it still works for them.

Like any tool or device--you use it if it works well for your needs, or until the liabilities outweigh the benefits.

That’s how I view Cakewalk. It’s the means to an end that I know best. But I certainly understand why pro studios still use Pro Tools — it’s the brand name that gets customers in the door.
 

bottlenecker

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Dec 6, 2015
Posts
4,876
Location
Wisconsin
I use it. I went to look into upgrading for the first time in more than a decade, and found out that it was free. It's updated constantly -- way more than it was when it was a program you had to pay for.

Interesting. Will it work without updating? I keep my recording machine offline with a no updates policy.
 

loopfinding

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Jun 19, 2011
Posts
3,756
Location
europe endless
And you can pretty much guarantee that he doesn't know much more about recording now. <g>

actually joke’s on people who studied arts at a “prestigious” private school. most of my teachers were adjuncts and also had gigs at the CC or state school in town. these days you pay for the paper, not the quality of education.
 

soundchaser59

Tele-Afflicted
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Posts
1,799
Location
Up The Creek
Still no examples of the trouble the OP has had with PT. Other than support. Is that it?

My impression over the years is that PT works extremely well and is very powerful IF......IF......IF you can afford all the stuff that is certified to work with it, and IF you configure the computer to be completely dedicated to PT, according to PT rules and laws and bylaws, etc. I'm half kidding a bit, but it does look to me like it will work fine and be very solid if you let it completely dominate your computer (which imo you should do with any DAW software if you are serious about producing music for public consumption) and you play along completely according to what is certified compatible with PT. It's the same as running a Windows computer.

The only reasons I don't use it is because I'm only producing music for myself and whomever will listen, and I absolutely cannot justify the price when I can do everything I need to do with Reaper. I can't afford good enough high end gear to be able to hear the difference between PT made music and Reaper made music.

I also don't care for the hype where some abrasive PT advocates want people to believe that only music made using PT will ever be of acceptable quality, and it is somehow neanderthal to use anything else. That is imo complete nonsense.
 

mkdaws32

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Aug 28, 2019
Posts
3,233
Age
52
Location
Moncton, NB Canada
Protools is great - I loved using it in a commercial studio setting. But for the home studio, I really don’t like the limitations of the “entry level” versions. I’ve used Logic, Sonar, Cubase, etc. I’ve used Reaper at home pretty exclusively from version 2 or 3. It’s the “Protools” for the rest of us in my mind. It just works and was instantly more familiar to me than the other available options.
 

Masmus

Tele-Holic
Joined
Feb 21, 2018
Posts
835
Age
53
Location
San Jose
One thing no one has mentioned other than using the computer primarily for recording is the problem having an anti-virus program installed and running. Pro studios aren't using their bread and butter to surf the web so don't really need it and don't do updates in the middle of a project.
 

MDMachiavelli

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Jan 25, 2015
Posts
1,913
Location
1,000 Miles From Nowhere
As others have said, I believe its the industry standard.

I prefer Logic Pro X myself.

If I lay down tracks in a studio I always get me masters so I can import the tracks individually in logic and save them in case I need them later.
 

Larry Mal

Tele-Meister
Joined
Oct 27, 2010
Posts
499
Location
Saint Louis, Missouri
Well, Pro Tools is a much different experience at the professional levels, the software is very good, and once you get up to HD and the affiliated hardware you are dealing with some pretty good stuff there.

And as has been mentioned, Pro Tools is used by a lot of people just because they know it well, and so it perpetuates itself in that way. You want to get a job, you gotta know Pro Tools and such.

Also, it's an industry standard and there's a lot of projects in that format. I have some from 2008.

So there certainly are reasons.

However, at the prosumer level, or the small project/home studio level, Pro Tools is not a very good choice. Avid is a horrible company and they did a terrible job positioning Pro Tools in the other markets, now they have pulled out and are focusing their product where it actually makes sense.
 

MDMachiavelli

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Jan 25, 2015
Posts
1,913
Location
1,000 Miles From Nowhere
Well, Pro Tools is a much different experience at the professional levels, the software is very good, and once you get up to HD and the affiliated hardware you are dealing with some pretty good stuff there.

And as has been mentioned, Pro Tools is used by a lot of people just because they know it well, and so it perpetuates itself in that way. You want to get a job, you gotta know Pro Tools and such.

Also, it's an industry standard and there's a lot of projects in that format. I have some from 2008.

So there certainly are reasons.

However, at the prosumer level, or the small project/home studio level, Pro Tools is not a very good choice. Avid is a horrible company and they did a terrible job positioning Pro Tools in the other markets, now they have pulled out and are focusing their product where it actually makes sense.

The three key points you stated.

Its the industry standard.
If you want a job you gotta know PT.
And it became the industry standard and has self perpetuated ever since.
 

Larry Mal

Tele-Meister
Joined
Oct 27, 2010
Posts
499
Location
Saint Louis, Missouri
And it's also good software. I could quibble with it, but it is certainly as good as anything else out there. I don't use it now, I mainly use Logic, but I know Live, Digital Performer, Cubase a little bit, and some others. I have used even more.

They are all very good, they all have strengths and weaknesses.

However, all of them run natively for the most part. Pro Tools has the hardware that goes with it, and that adds to the experience.

If you don't have the hardware, though, Pro Tools is just another DAW with strengths and weaknesses.
 

T Prior

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Mar 17, 2003
Posts
7,416
Location
Charlotte NC
One thing no one has mentioned other than using the computer primarily for recording is the problem having an anti-virus program installed and running. Pro studios aren't using their bread and butter to surf the web so don't really need it and don't do updates in the middle of a project.

yes excellent comment !

IF we are running any DAW on a daily internet connected PC, Laptop or Mac, we are asking for trouble and it will come find you.

WIN 10 has somehow decided that we cannot turn off AUTO UPDATES but we can disable the internet connection.

If we have a small home studio that we use often, its best to have a dedicated DAW PC/MAC/Laptop. NO internet enabled.

Treat it as a tool because thats what it is.

Internet disabled, no anti virus, no other programs running in the background taking up CPU resources etc.

Now that I think about it, and I overlooked this in my comments above, its possible that I have had literally ZERO issues over the last 12 or 13 years because I run Pro Tools on 2 separate dedicated DAW /PC's. 8 runs on an old XP machine I built in 09 and 12 runs on a WIN 7 machine I built in 2015 . They are OFF unless I turn them on, auto updates are off , neither has an anti virus or other programs running in the background and the internet connection is disabled.

If you are running WIN 10, dedicated, be sure to set Updates to PAUSE when you go on line to grab a download or plug-in.
 
Last edited:

Skully

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Jun 12, 2003
Posts
13,589
Location
Glamorous NoHo
Well, Pro Tools is a much different experience at the professional levels, the software is very good, and once you get up to HD and the affiliated hardware you are dealing with some pretty good stuff there.

And as has been mentioned, Pro Tools is used by a lot of people just because they know it well, and so it perpetuates itself in that way. You want to get a job, you gotta know Pro Tools and such.

Also, it's an industry standard and there's a lot of projects in that format. I have some from 2008.

So there certainly are reasons.

However, at the prosumer level, or the small project/home studio level, Pro Tools is not a very good choice. Avid is a horrible company and they did a terrible job positioning Pro Tools in the other markets, now they have pulled out and are focusing their product where it actually makes sense.

The pro audio recording market has to be relatively tiny, so it's not a good business for Avid to be in. They can't charge outrageous prices for the product, and they can't scale up to have enough free cash for reasonable R&D and support. On the picture editing side of the business, they can't charge the outrageous prices they used to charge for their editing systems, but they're used (I assume still) on projects with massively complex and demanding workflows, and I imagine they can charge a premium to service those productions. Still, it doesn't seem that Avid has much hope of scaling that business, either.
 

wildschwein

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Posts
1,795
Location
Perth, Western Australia
The pro audio recording market has to be relatively tiny, so it's not a good business for Avid to be in. They can't charge outrageous prices for the product, and they can't scale up to have enough free cash for reasonable R&D and support. On the picture editing side of the business, they can't charge the outrageous prices they used to charge for their editing systems, but they're used (I assume still) on projects with massively complex and demanding workflows, and I imagine they can charge a premium to service those productions. Still, it doesn't seem that Avid has much hope of scaling that business, either.
Enter the subscription model: https://www.pro-tools-expert.com/home-page/2020/8/6/avid-technology-announces-q2-2020-results
 




Top