1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Why do people give up guitar?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Flat6Driver, Oct 15, 2014.

  1. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    22,928
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2011
    Location:
    Around
    I believe it is that "immediate gratification" societal thing....

    imho
     
  2. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    26,051
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2009
    Location:
    Coolum Beach,Australia
    These days... I rate people by their interest/capability in playing guitar/an instrument/music.... from there down.... even my bestest of old friends... like? you used to play and were better than me..and you gave up?... you don't want to hold this guitar and make a loud twang through an amp?... dude/dudette... sorry, WTF?... you DILL!

    I seem to care less and less about.."the others",,, I don't have a lot of time left to bother about people who don't have a musical bone in their body.....

    that's why I run the primary school rock band ... I found out there are kids there who play guitar want a band and no one wants to help them? huh? ... I figured, I best hang out with these kids, the future of Oz rock, support them..... at least we can speak the same language..... and one day I might see them shine on a bigger stage or entertain locally....

    my generation?.. I've given up on them as band members...;)
     
  3. Colo Springs E

    Colo Springs E Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    16,177
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2003
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    In my experience, it's frustration. I've quit playing for long stretches of time (years), and eventually always come back, thinking it will be different this time--this time, I'll practice more, I'll learn complete songs, learn more about music theory, etc.

    I never do it. I get a guitar, start noodling around, experimenting with the controls and effects, and of course never get any better. Then, I get frustrated and p*ssed because I didn't get any better after all.

    I give up and sell the gear.

    Just recently bought an electric and a small amp, and I give myself 3-6 months because I have once again fallen into the same pattern.

    Unfortunately I have two things working against me: I don't want to work at it, I just want to be good without putting in work. Secondly, unfortunately I don't have a lot of natural talent. It doesn't come intuitively for me.

    I'm no better today at 51 then I was at 18, and I'm not exaggerating. I probably know more songs/pieces of songs, but my ability is no better. The casual listener would think I'm not bad... most here would listen to me and assume I've been playing a year or less.
     
  4. ole6string

    ole6string Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    380
    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2007
    Location:
    Williamsport, PA
    It has been my experience that we all like to try our hand at things. Some stick, some don't. The only way you ever find out if you like something or not is to give it a try. If it is not for us, we move on to something else.
     
  5. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    26,051
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2009
    Location:
    Coolum Beach,Australia
    "If it is not for us, we move on to something else."...

    that's what I worry about in those friends who used to play quite well and inspired me years ago.... geez, I gave up guitar for a lot of the 80's (out sailing)... yet couldn't forget I liked to play..at even the most basic level... and got the fire back plugging in to amps rather than play acoustic...

    Oh man.... you gotta have a go at this... this is sik....;)

    it's not like they never knew how and would have difficulty strumming a few chords these days.. those who still have their old guitar in the case... whose kids are playing music at home through school....speak to me in volumes how good their kid is playing...

    I think.. what happened to your mojo man?... your love of a good jam session, your songwriting.. something that's literally at your finger tips..... sigh..

    Here, just hold this tele I built... and hear /feel what it's like to hear yourself through a valve twin.... mate.. I'll give you my telecaster .. right here and now... if you get the shiite out of your head.. and strum a big E/A chord.... and remember what it meant to you once....;)
     
  6. zimbo

    zimbo Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,748
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2007
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    I think you have to want to learn songs. Some people might take up the guitar to learn Stairway. They finally learn it and then what? You have to have an interest in learning new songs. I put my ipod on shuffle and hear a song that I would like to learn to play. Or I watch a YouTube video and see someone playing a song I like and I think I can do that too. You have to want to keep learning new songs or else improve on what you already know.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2014
  7. tele salivas

    tele salivas Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,893
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2008
    Location:
    Mounds, OK
    I quit playing music altogether for 7 years after it being the reason why I woke up int he morning. I didn't feel it 110% anymore. Then I got into guitar again, into playing music again, except this time I got into hard country from the 50's and 60's that my wife turned me onto. That sound got me interested. I used to dislike country music, then I heard the good stuff, what I consider good stuff. I fell in love with the pedal steel sound and for the last two years have immersed my time into the pedal steel. I love sound, effects, things that go kaboom, twang, and boing in the night.
     
  8. Alamo

    Alamo Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    12,010
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2006
    Location:
    Berlin
    Perhaps some folks get pulled by some ads.
    then finally they channel their inner self, which says: "ach, let's do sumthin' else" :lol:
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Drubbing

    Drubbing Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,617
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2012
    Location:
    Perth, West Australia
    I think you really have to love music. you have to enjoy the feel and sound of the noises that you make from the guitar, just the simple pleasure of making nice sounds.

    I think many who fail set their ambitions and expectations way too high, and give themselves too little time to to develop good basics and gain competence.

    Talent, whatever that is, can help. But those who take to guitar as if it were natural, are rare. Fro most, it's about persevering when things get difficult, and pushing yourself forward when you can see what needs working on, instead of staying in a comfort zone and ripping out the same songs, riffs and licks.
     
  10. Flat6Driver

    Flat6Driver Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    47
    Posts:
    3,818
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    Location:
    DC Burbs
    I'm surprised to find so many quitters on the actual guitar forum, I was thinking more of other people you all know.


    I've had moments of that too. I had a bout last Friday night where I felt like starting a fire and chucking my white squier on top of it. Not because of the guitar, because I was really tired and couldn't do what I wanted to do.

    Until I joined this forum, I never knew what I was "missing" in terms of controls and effects. I had a 1980's solid state Princeton chorus and didn't know any better. I have wizened up of course. But, I have never been too in awe of the equipment. I have never sold anything either. I am tripping over stuff as it is.

    What I do like about this as a hobby, is that I can spend a couple of grand and now I have the same guitar/amp as my hero. I guess if I liked basketball, all I would need is a ball and some sneakers.



    Good point. I never learned the "classics" so I'm learning them now. I picked it up at 19 in college so the internet was around. Instant grat was a part of my life as well. I could pull up a chord chart, play around and if I couldn't get it, move along. Singing (if you wanna call it that) was always a part of it, so I always learned songs. I can't sing and play a complicated riff. I have been going back to focusing more on learning various parts, playing along with my ipod, jamming with others, started a small band, went to a jam session. It's like working out, you have to keep it fresh. I am constantly cycling through stuff I play, forgetting stuff, but finding it comes back quicker the more I play.

    Last night, I spent 30 minutes working on one riff. Put it in the looper and slowed it down so I could play along. Then found some jam tracks and tried to remember the intro to a song my band did a few times. Then noodled over it for a while, just to see how it sounds.

    I did take pause for several years and lost my calluses, mostly because I had little kids and couldn't keep the volume up, and had some other things going on. I have reapproached with the patience of an adult and I'm loving it. Are there days it sounds like I don't know what I'm doing? Oh yeah. Are there days when I'm soaring and having a good time? More of those.
     
  11. Nightatthehotel

    Nightatthehotel Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    614
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2012
    I used to assemble plastic models. You know like WWII planes and stuff. That lasted a few months cuz I just couldnt stick with it. A few months after that I picked up guitar and I dont ever imagine myself putting it down.
     
  12. Mjark

    Mjark Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    13,639
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2011
    Location:
    Annapolis, MD
    People give up guitar because it’s not as easy as it looks. Aside from a lot of effort, playing any musical instrument proficiently requires innate musical ability. Not everyone has it.
     
  13. idjster

    idjster VERY grateful member Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    5,389
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    Location:
    Saskatchewan, Canada
    I started playing guitar in the folk era - I love folk music. Back then I had a reason to play, folks to play with (important for learning in my opinion), and venues to play in. I knew I was never going anywhere big with it, I just loved doing it. Then life took over, lots of difficult things happened to me that I had to concentrate on in order to live, so I put the guitar down and didn't touch it for years. One day some years ago I was in a music store for another reason, picked up a Tele, and here I am. Musically back where I was before pretty much, but now I play for myself and for the occasional gig when I can't get out of it or it pays too good to say no. Why did I quit? Because I couldn't make music my life I let other parts of life get in the way. I didn't see music as a part of my life, not all of it. Now I can make that separation.
     
  14. Strat-Mangler

    Strat-Mangler Banned

    Posts:
    897
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2012
    Location:
    Toronto
    No, I totally buy the "I don't have time" argument.

    Between work, my commute, my responsibilities as a husband and house-owner, not to mention dog owner, I have next to not time to myself.

    It's great to be able to pick up a guitar and start playing Hendrix and SRV but the amount of blood, sweat, and tears I had to inject into this instrument for YEARS to be this good isn't something I'd be able to duplicate.

    I was actually talking about this with my wife a couple of weeks ago. I was telling her that if somebody were to strip me of all my talent and experience and I'd have to relearn how to play from scratch, I wouldn't have the time to get to a level that would be palatable for anybody to listen to. If I were to have a stroke or something and I'd have forgotten everything, I'd just sell it all.

    To say that I'm thrilled with being able to play well is an understatement but I'd definitely regret not being able to, if it came down to it. Meanwhile, I find it a little irritating when people assume that it's an easy thing to learn. So far, not a single person in my life that I've ever talked to has ever stuck with it. That's DOZENS of people who bought a guitar, started, and gave up. That I know of personally.

    They want to master an instrument but aren't ready to invest any kind of time nor effort into it. The results are predictable, to say the least.
     
  15. Lobomov

    Lobomov Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,045
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2013
    Location:
    Europa
    We try a lot of things and most of them we don't pursue. Guitar has to have a purpose or function.


    For me it is escapism and it has been since 1986 .. I suspect this is the case for many of us.
     
  16. 6942

    6942 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    67
    Posts:
    6,333
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Location:
    Santa Fe, NM
    When I finally quit (I'm 61 now).
    It will be because I cannot play any more because..................................................

    Arthritis done did me in! :(
     
  17. g-Paul

    g-Paul Tele-Holic

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    680
    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Location:
    Leafs Nation
    Hmm, maybe because they were seated at a table right in front of the stage at a Johnny Winter show.

    Actually I didn't give it up, I just felt like giving it up.
     
  18. ryokan

    ryokan Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    974
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2005
    Yup. And the older you get, the more you realize you have to focus on the few things you REALLY love, and let the rest fall away. There is only so much time.
     
  19. muffy

    muffy Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    111
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2014
    Location:
    GTA
    I started playing when I was about 14 for all the wrong reasons. I played practiced on and off for about 7 years before I really took it a lot more seriously. I'm still the worst guitar player I've ever known, but I truly enjoy playing, collecting, trading, and modding my gear.

    A lot of you mentioned "innate musical talent" and I can agree to some extent. I got my first taste of music playing trumpet in school. I learned to read scores, music theory, etc, FOR school and it was easy applying all of that to guitar. If I didn't have that developed musical aptitude guitar would have been a LOT harder to pick up (I'm self taught).

    Now I do regret not getting lessons when I started out. That could have sped up my development a ton. But nowadays there's plenty of great lessons on the web/youtube. Gear is also a lot cheaper now. We have great gear options at every price point. You could spend less than $300 and get a decent setup that can cover pretty much any genre, ie, small modeling amp and a squier or epiphone.

    I started off with a decent Yamaha strat copy and some gross Marshall beginner solid state amp. A lot of the times I was "off-again" because I either couldn't figure something in a song out (with youtube and web lessons it's more accessible now) or I couldn't get my gear to sound right (cheaper and more versatile gear now). If I had started playing with the gear available now for the same price I wouldn't have those issues. I would've been more interested in playing. After all, it's easier to tough it out when your gear looks, feels, and sounds good. Therefore, I think picking up the guitar and learning for the next 10 years compared to the last 10 years will be a lot easier.
     
  20. 1300 E Valencia

    1300 E Valencia Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,685
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Location:
    Fullerton CA
    I hope that many quit because they realize they are doing our ears a great favor.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.