Why Do My Strings Die Prematurely?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Fretting out, Jul 31, 2019.

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  1. Nick Fanis

    Nick Fanis Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    ALL strings die after 8-12 HOURS of playing.
    You simply HEAR this more on a tele because,especially on the wound strings,the TWANG goes away.

    I always change strings after 8-12 hours of playing (I play mostly CLEAN and do a lot of wound string "twanging" so I immediately notice when the twang goes away,if you play with lots of dirt and mostly on the unwound string for soloing you may not need to change strings that often)
     
  2. saltyseadog

    saltyseadog TDPRI Member

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    Maybe you could try raising and lowering the pickups the next time they reach the "dead" stage. It might just be that the pickups need adjusting?.
     
  3. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Two months?!? I can barely get two hours out of a set before they sound like rubber bands. The strings on my main guitar get changed every gig. So 3-5 times a week on average.
     
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  4. Shuster

    Shuster Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Malnutrition, it really sad to see a starving string go that way:(
     
  5. magicfingers99

    magicfingers99 Friend of Leo's

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    try coated strings, they sound new a lot longer.
    elixir's work well.
     
  6. magicfingers99

    magicfingers99 Friend of Leo's

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    they say its the oils from you skin and the dead skin the deadens the tone on the strings. you could try wiping the string with alchol or alcohol pads, and see if you notice any difference.
     
  7. Fretting out

    Fretting out Tele-Holic

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    I was ordering a bunch of strings for my acoustic and accidentally bought a set of electric elixirs in my preferred 12-52 so I put them on my strat.
    They haven’t been on there too long so I’m not sure how they’ll hold up but so far I like them, I’ll have to try them on the Les Paul and see if I still have the same issue.
     
  8. magicfingers99

    magicfingers99 Friend of Leo's

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    I like everything about them but the hole in my wallet. They seem to have really jumped price in the last 3 years. Glad I stocked up when they were reasonable.
     
  9. Skydog1010

    Skydog1010 Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

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    Mine have been dying at an unsustainable rate since first reading this. I'm cutting their balls off to use as spacers for wrapping strings over my LP stop bars.

    Services for my dead strings will be held on Saturday at noon Eastern time.

    I should be strung up.:lol:
     
  10. bigbean

    bigbean Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    My 2 cents.

    Before you put your d'dad strings on take a paper towel and soak it with WD-40 and wipe the strings down. You will likely find a bunch of grime on the towel. Getting the grime off before you put them on the git where it will mix with your natural finger funk will make them last a bit longer. ( trick from Neill Young's old guitar tech.)

    For me strings are 20 hours of playing time max. After that the fret wear on the back side of the strings means the intonation is poo.

    I use Kurt Mangan's (11-50s with a wound third) wipe them with a WD-40 towel before you put them on and you get.......................nothing.
     
  11. outbreak

    outbreak Tele-Afflicted

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    If an exorcism is hard to come by I'd be willing to take ownership of them.
     
  12. stanger

    stanger Tele-Meister

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    Why do your strings die prematurely?
    'Cause you break their little hearts.
     
  13. toomuchfun

    toomuchfun Tele-Holic

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    I have a Gibson that would eat strings quickly and found out the pick guard was out-gassing and causing the problem. It also affected the pickup cover.

    May not be your problem but things other than your hands can affect the strings.
     
  14. dickey

    dickey Tele-Afflicted

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    Gibson guitars have set necks, so they do NOT have the resonance, or "twang" that bolt-on neck guitars, like Fenders have, so the strings always appear to sound "dead" faster on them, even though they are not. All set-neck guitars do that, which is why I ONLY play bolt-ons. Plus, if you wipe your necks down after every time you play, maple necks will stay cleaner because of their fingerboard finish; rosewood necks hold dirt more.

    BTW you sorta answered your question with the first 5 words of your post, the key word being "D'Addario". try GHS or SIT. Much better. Only thing worse than "D" strings are Fender. Last about half a song.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
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