Why do my pears suck?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by paulblackford, Jul 31, 2021.

  1. paulblackford

    paulblackford Tele-Afflicted

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    I've been living in my house for quite some time, and have a pear tree in the backyard. I've never really eaten the pears. They're not a fruit I'm that into, but they're not offensive to me. I just never went out there, and picked them. I always left them for the squirrels (they seem to love them). This year I decided that I would try them...and they're terrible. First, they are about half the size of your average Kroger pear, but they are falling off the tree at that size, so I have to assume that it is their ripened state. Secondly, they are hard as hell. Third, they are not juicy at all. Before you ask - Yes! I'm sure that it is a pear tree :) So why do my pears suck? Is this the way all 'wild' pears are? As it is, I'm leaving them for the squirrels.
     
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  2. BelairPlayer

    BelairPlayer Tele-Afflicted

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    Usually, if they’re hard, they’re not ripe. Put some on a counter next to some bananas. Bananas give off a gas that ripens other fruits more quickly. As to why they fall off, if you’ve never fertilized the tree it may be weak/malnourished. Are the leaves curled/spotty? You could have leaf blight or fire blight. Just some quick ideas.
     
  3. David Barnett

    David Barnett Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Could it be an "ornamental" pear tree?
     
  4. Killing Floor

    Killing Floor Friend of Leo's

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    Could be prickly pears.
     
  5. Torren61

    Torren61 Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    I read that as "peers" and took offense for a few seconds...
     
  6. Fretting out

    Fretting out Poster Extraordinaire

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    Banana gas!? Is this a thing?

    Sounds scary
     
  7. Boreas

    Boreas Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    FWIW, most pear trees require another pear tree for proper pollination. I believe Bartlett pears do not REQUIRE it, but do better if there is another tree as well.
     
  8. 985plowboy

    985plowboy Friend of Leo's

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    No, that’s just the variety you have.
    There’s one in my mom’s yard that we planted 44 years ago.
    Hard as raw turnips but they Taste pretty good.
    Peel them and cut them in small pieces and they’re palatable.
     
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  9. David Barnett

    David Barnett Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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  10. paulblackford

    paulblackford Tele-Afflicted

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  11. billy logan

    billy logan Tele-Meister

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    NEVER MIND (just saw post #10 I'll post anyway haha)
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    If it's not an ornamental variety, was there a dry spell after fruit set?
    Maybe there were good early conditions for heavy fruit set, but then the tree reacted to stress by dropping the fruit early.
    Some growers "flower-prune" to concentrate the trees' energy into the fewer remaining flowers/fruit.

    Could be the tree used to be an edible variety that was grafted onto a coarser, hardier pear variety's rootstock, but the Bartlett or whatever part died, leaving the "hardy-but-not-good-fruit" rootstock to send up branches and predominate.

    Is there a single trunk or does it look like a tall shrub?
    In a vacant lot near me there was a tree that set Asian pears in the middle, but inedible pears on its periphery which I think was the rootstock variety getting out of hand.
     
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  12. paulblackford

    paulblackford Tele-Afflicted

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    It is a pretty messed up, multi-trunk looking tree. I'm beginning to think these pears require too much commitment, Haha. I now have a squirrel food tree in my back yard.
     
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  13. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    Why do my pears suck?

    Because Kentucky is moving northward.


    No, wait, I messed up the joke.

    Hang on...
     
  14. DeepDangler

    DeepDangler Tele-Holic

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    You could try watering and fertilizing the tree next year and see how they turn out. It sounds like your tree is the pear equivalent of a crab apple tree.

    We have a family friend that uses crab apples for jam. She peels them, cooks them, and adds loads of sugar to compensate for the tartness. The jam is great and the same treatment might work for your pears.
     
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  15. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Yeah, this could be a varietal for cooking just like some varieties of apples. I would slice some, place on a cookie sheet, spread granulated sugar and cinnamon on them and bake them for awhile just as a test. The baking will soften them. Could be perfect for a breakfast crumble.
     
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  16. MrClint

    MrClint Tele-Holic

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    Pears don't ripen on the tree. They are one of the few fruits that will ripen, soften, and develop sugars on the counter.
     
  17. dogmeat

    dogmeat Friend of Leo's

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    ... so many opportunities to get banned... must resist....

    dahm.... got a whole monolog going here.... great straight line
     
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  18. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Do you have partridges? If not that’s your problem.
     
  19. Fendereedo

    Fendereedo Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've got damsons, pears and apples in my garden. My wife eats the pears though, I've never been able to get past the gritty texture, when eating them tbh.
     
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  20. Lies&Distortion

    Lies&Distortion Tele-Afflicted

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    I believe that's the origin of the "one bad apple" saying. Ethylene gas emits from ripe and rotting fruits.
     
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