Why a 1983 telecaster isn't collectable!

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by 83siennateleguy, Jul 29, 2018.

  1. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I actually think that the early to mid 1980s was an excellent era for Telecaster Music. It was a great guitar for a lot of the kinds of music I love from this period.

    The problem was, many of these players used older Telecasters or the made great music with less than great instruments from a "rebuilding" time for FMIC.

    I'm not really very inclined to buy or play something because it was "from my birthyear" or it is the same model as Hero 1. I'm not averse to buying Signature Models or clones of guitars once used by great musicians. But I will buy the instrument that works better and walk right past the one just like Hero 3's guitar. I've got 4 of these Jimmie Vaughan MIM Strats, and I think they're great and Jimmy is great but I could go six weeks without listening to one of his recordings or playing one of his compositions. I mostly just think the specifications are superb.
     
  2. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I don't necessarily agree that much with Big E, but your skin is way too thin here. Or perhaps he's probing you harder because you're so vehement about the primacy of your opinion and it isn't a "majority" opinion..

    Value does matter, for example for insurance purposes or if you go through a Divorce settlement, and you have the right to know what your instrument is worth. It just so happens not to be worth much. So, buy some duplicates. The Market says these are not worth much and all the Jawboning is only going to alienate possible commerce in the product. One thing is sure, when there's no buying and selling of them at all, prices go down further.
     
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  3. awasson

    awasson Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    I agree. For me it’s all about the specs; fretboard radius, neck carve, type of hardware, pickups, tuners etc... and I’d add to this that today I have my pick of extremely well priced, high quality guitars to choose from. I don’t necessarily need to choose an artist series, I can get a 60’s Baja Telecaster or a 50’s Baja or the new Player series or the old Classic Series or Classic Player Series. We truly are living in the best time for acquiring guitars.
     
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  4. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Yeah, we were so intent on carpet bombing Henry Juszkiewicz, we didn't notice all the bloodshed at FMIC. And, it didn't fit our narrative. Sometimes I think this happens because those most deeply immersed in all things FMIC are heavy overloaded with older FMIC stuff and we've gone past the breaking point - can't find room for one more amp or guitar (and it probably wouldn't be current FMIC anyway). Aficionados who don't buy anything can't subject a misbehaving company to a boycott - not if we're not buying anything anyway. Maybe you buy one, but so many here are heavily overweight with existing "stuff".
     
  5. strat a various

    strat a various Friend of Leo's

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    "Desirability" is the measure of how many people like what one likes.
    It's a waste of oxygen to get bent out of shape because not very many players or collectors like what one likes. It's a matter of taste. One day a trend could appear, for reasons we'll never know for sure, and a guitar like that '83 Tele could become very popular. (That won't happen ... but it's technically not impossible). Everybody doesn't like the same things, get used to it y'all.
     
  6. JayFreddy

    JayFreddy Poster Extraordinaire

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    Two year ago Guitar Center offered me $800 cash for mine.

    I assume they intended to tag it for more than that, but as I see it, my 83 is worth at least $800.

    I consider that a decent resale value.

    Adjusting for inflation, my 83 has held its value well since I purchased it used in 1998 for $450.

    I don't think there is a problem.

    These guitars have a small following and they are holding their value as well as anything in the same price range.

    It's a little annoying that some people diss these guitars, but from the bridge saddles, to the thick poly and flat fingerboards, they aren't a traditional Telecaster.

    What do you expect?

    If you like yours, play it.

    If you don't, you shouldn't have too much trouble finding a buyer.
     
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  7. AxemanVR

    AxemanVR Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    All I'm saying is, from the point of view of a typical young guitar player back in the day, the 80's music trends favored more pointy headstock style guitars and the competition from manufacturers like Dean, Ibanez and Charvel exploded onto the scene and took quite a chunk of the market share from the more traditional guitar manufacturers during that period.

    Fortunately Fender was both lucky and savvy enough to turn things back around in the 90's and the rest is of course history...


    '
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
  8. Larmo63

    Larmo63 Friend of Leo's

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    I built a Tele with an slight relic'd MJT body, Pick-up Wizard pick-ups, and a Fender baseball bat neck that blows away any Fender made factory model I've ever owned.

    It has "mojo," I used great components, and I couldn't care less what it's worth.
     
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  9. golfnut

    golfnut Friend of Leo's

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    Probably wouldn't get your money back even parted out. But if you love it thats all that matters.
     
  10. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Yes.

    And this is why I have FOUR of these Saab 9-5 automobiles. I find them good, but evidently the Market does not agree. And so they are very cheap. If somehow everyone got on the Bandwagon, I'd eventually be forced off because part of why I like them is that parts are crazy cheap and plentiful, and should I ever have to go to a mechanic he knows I can either pay half of what he'd prefer to charge, or I can use that same money and just buy another one.

    I didn't get the 3rd and 4th ones until 2015. I figured at least one would be parked by now, but no. I can park these vehicles in extremely sketchy and remote places and people seem to ignore them. Speed cops ignore me; hustlers ignore me. There's simply no way I could be mistaken for a participant in a drug or arms deal. It is like declaring a sort of Switzerland status in the world of cars and money and people.

    And I think a circa 1983 Telecaster has landed in the same sort of No Man's Land. Might as well enjoy that status instead of fretting over it.

    So, people, don't buy a Saab 9-5. You won't like it! :^)
     
  11. AxemanVR

    AxemanVR Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    `
    That's actually a really good comparison...

    I'd hazard to guess that, when someone mentions Saab, most people think of something like a Saab 900, not the 9-5. There's just something sexy about the 900s compared to the more mainstream look of the 9-5.

    As it pertains to our original topic, that doesn't mean a 1983 Fender can't be sexy, but most people probably don't see them as being quite "as sexy" as, say, a pre-1965 version, so the desirability factor just isn't at the same level, which makes it easier to acquire one at a greatly reduced price...


    `
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
  12. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I think these Saab 9-5s are exceptionally conservative designs; almost an absence of trendy statement. The 1983 basic Telecasters are sort of the same thing. I think about a guy like Jeff Buckley and I sometimes think the performance theme was: "Listen to this guitar, don't look at it". "Look at how unafraid I am to walk on this tightwire - have you ever let yourself be this vulnerable?". When you stick your neck out this far, it doesn't matter if your guitar is conservative looking. You have another message to convey.

    +

    People hear I attended the JHE Axis Bold as Love tour stop in Buffalo, and they want a nuts and bolts breakdown of Jimi's Strats. But the truth is, I was too distracted by the mind blowing show (Mitch Mitchell also) and I couldn't personally tell you what the headstock shape or size was. Other fish to fry such as "Is this performance real or have I died and done to Heaven?"
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
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  13. alathIN

    alathIN Tele-Holic

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    Catching up with this thread, there seems to be some blurring between "collectible" and "a good instrument to play."
    One of my favorite guitars ever is a made in China factory B-stock Ibanez knockoff of an ES-335. It's not even Ibanez's top of the line model for this guitar - kind of mid-grade. But from the very first moment I picked it up, it played like a dream. the original pickups were pretty decent, but I like the guitar enough to replace them with Seymour Duncan Seth Lovers. I did some minor wiring upgrades. I replaced the pickup rings and volume and tone knobs with a different color that I thought looked better. And then finally I put a Bigsby on it, then put graphtech saddles on it to help with tuning stability.

    Nobody in their right mind would consider this guitar to be collectible. Even 40 years from now, no one's ever going to say it's a highly desirable vintage guitar.
    A lot of people would say I'm crazy for putting all that work, plus parts almost in excess of the original price I paid, for a very pedestrian model Chinese guitar, that didn't even pass their quality inspection.

    But, to me, it's exactly the guitar I want. I love the way it sounds, I love the way it feels.

    If I started a thread titled "why I love this inexpensive Chinese guitar," there is a possibility that I might get some agreement, probably mixed with some critical or snobbish comments.

    But if I started a thread saying "I think my guitar should be widely recognized as elite quality and demand a premium price if I tried to sell it," I'd expect a lot of disagreement and questioning my sanity.
     
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  14. 83siennateleguy

    83siennateleguy Tele-Meister

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    Hey thanks for your 2 cents on this.
    I agree with your comments on your guitar and the way you feel about. Glad it makes you happy.
    Maybe a little confusion here on both our parts. I just asked a question as to why ( and I'm pretty sure I admitted to it not being collectable) , just asked why.
    I guess I'm not aloud to ask that in your eyes and it makes me insane ?
    Ok. Have a great day!
     
  15. 2 Headed Goat

    2 Headed Goat Friend of Leo's

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    Well, a definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results...

    You asked the question, many folks have chimed with their take on it/thoughts/opinions, etc... and you seem to take umbrage (and much of it very personally), get upset/annoyed and IMO belabour the point... Unless you're seeking heaps of attention or validation... why is it so important that folks agree with you??

    I dig early MM guitars and Leo-era G&L's... IMB they're WAY undervalued but I could give a rat's arse whether others agree or disagree. Folks dig what they dig - there's no right or wrong bro.
     
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  16. awasson

    awasson Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    And that’s what it’s all about! Acquiring a guitar for a reasonable amount of money, adjusting it to make it the best it can be and playing it. To me that is the mission and it requires no pedigree or collectibility.

    I mentioned earlier that I recently bought a super cheap 94 MIM Strat, did some mods like you did to your MIC Ibanez and the guitar is mind blowingly great. I had a 1992 USA Standard Strat that isn’t half the instrument the cheap MIM one is. The US Standard would be “worth” more dollar wise but given the choice, I’d play the cheap MIM one every time.
     
  17. nosuch

    nosuch Friend of Leo's

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    Well, a guitar model is collectable if there are collectors collecting it. Maybe you should just start a collection of 83 teles and voilá: It's collectable.
     
  18. John C

    John C Friend of Leo's

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    Sorry for a quick hijack - G&L has reissued the Skyhawk model with a really nice recreation of the Leo-era circa 1984-85 body shape. They look killer - the only problem is that as you say Leo-era G&Ls (and MMs) are way, WAY undervalued. The reissue has a $1,699 MAP, but you can typically find 3-4 real 1980s Skyhawks for under $1K with a minimum of internet searching.
     
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  19. alathIN

    alathIN Tele-Holic

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    no, not insane. I recognize that just about all of this stuff is subjective and just based on what you like. I don't really call anybody insane for any kind of opinion about music or musical gear. I forget the guys name but there's some very prominent guitarist right now who who plays very low rent import guitars from the 60s. He's a heck of a lot better player than I am.

    And I guess that's what I was getting at about what you personally like versus what is deemed to be "collectible." It's preposterous for anybody to argue about what you are I personally like.

    When you talk about what's collectible, vintage, whatever, you're talking about a value that people place on it above and beyond it's value simply as a musical instrument or simply how how much one person likes to play it. It becomes kind of a mass popularity contest. there isn't necessarily any logical criteria to it, other than a large number of people agree that it has an excess value above and beyond what you would pay for a comprable instrument that didn't have whatever arbitrary age or finish or whatever. There really isn't any more rhyme or reason to that than what makes you or I like our personal guitars.

    Back to the guy who's become famous recently playing old catalog store guitars - the reason I heard about this was a podcast they were talking about how the value of these kind of guitars has suddenly shot up, and guitars that were dismissed as cheap old junk a few years ago are now fetching premium collectible prices, and now there's a boutique builder who's making that style of guitar.

    The long and the short of it is a lot of this stuff is arbitrary, based on the opinions of other people that don't always make a lot of sense. It doesn't pay to take any of this stuff personally. Just enjoy your guitar, and who knows, maybe next year someone will get famous playing their beloved 1983 Telecaster and all the sudden they'll be in high demand. For all we know, it might be you.
     
  20. John C

    John C Friend of Leo's

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    Now this is very true - some things are insanely collectible because someone famous played them. For example, Mustangs weren't all that popular; you could by real '60s ones for a reasonable price and the 70s-style ones were dirt cheap - until this guy Kurt Cobain started playing them; then they shot up in price. Thanks to Radiohead's Johnny Greenwood the first version Tele Pluses now fetch high prices (that's the version with the Dually Red Lace Sensor in the bridge position).

    As 83siennateleguy mentioned about the most famous player using a 1983-84 Standard Tele was Jeff Buckley, who had (has?) kind of limited appeal. But if the next musical phenom gets famous playing a 1983-84 Standard then the collectible price will skyrocket. Until then they are undervalue guitars loved by a somewhat small group of players.
     
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