Why “Thanks for playing.”?

Discussion in 'Worship Service Players' started by beatnik, Jul 3, 2019.

  1. beatnik

    beatnik Tele-Meister

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    warning slight sarcasm alert.

    It seems that the only thing leadership can say to folks who play is “thanks for playing” which to me sounds like thanks for wearing pants or thanks for not smoking camels during the service.

    When I led if I said something like that you could just see the vacantness in the person’s eyes. So I learned to find something that they did well and point out that I heard what they did and I appreciated their work and creativity. The fact that a person in leadership paid attention to what they were doing really made a difference in how they approached their craft. Far better than an empty “thanks for not screaming obscenities into the mic this week.” (Which sometimes is quite the accomplishment).

    Maybe it is just me...
     
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  2. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    Not just you. Thanks for playing is what people say when they feel they should say something, but don't care enough to think of something meaningful.
     
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  3. studio

    studio Poster Extraordinaire

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    Before IEMs and piano players only wanting to hear themselves and maybe the vocalist,
    there was a time when MUSICIANS ACTUALLY PLAYED TOGETHER!

    By today's standards, there's little doubt musicians back then really had to click and
    they really had to listen to each other. Today, I'm not so sure.

    Drums behind plexi, electric guitars with amps in another room, lyrics on giant screens.
    There's nothing wrong with any of this, if it doesn't take away from the musicianship.
    The battlefield is the sanctuary stage. Thanks for Playing sounds a lot better than
    Thanks for enduring the trend of the ever evolving stage plot.

    Maybe you should say, " I hope you come back".
     
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  4. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    If you want decent music, the musicians still have to play in ensemble. They have to not only hear each other, they need to actually listen to one another. You can tell instantly whether a church band is together or whether the musicians have just created their own personal mixes in their IEM. In my experience, thanks for playing is a slap in the face by one musician who didn't care enough to even turn you up in his/her personal IEM mix to even be able to hear you. IEM's are the worst thing that has happened for most amateur church musicians since deafness. That's just my opinion of course, but I seriously would love to start a fire in the middle of our stage and burn every piece of our IEM system. It would be the best thing for the quality of music in our church given our musicians.
     
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  5. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    I find that music is just as completely foreign to some people as a different language. That is, that don't know when it is good or poor. My own father is like this. A good friend of mine in the ministry is like this. Music is just not on their radar at all. As in, they don't even know that they are "supposed" to appreciate the talent that some people give back. They're not even thinking about it.

    So when I encounter people that appear to fit into that category, I try to recognize it and just cut them some slack. Their world is different than mine.
     
  6. black_doug

    black_doug Tele-Afflicted

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    Yes, I'm really grateful for a WL that actually hears what I'm playing. I often get a compliment on something specific.

    Last Sunday he said my tone was "really cool" on one of the songs. All I did was listen to the YouTube video he sent out to everyone to prepare, then use the right pedals.

    BTW, we are a congregation of about 100 using IEMs.
     
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  7. GoldieLocks

    GoldieLocks Tele-Afflicted

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    You mean: "Thanks for Creating MAGIC!". We musicians are like spiritual Wizards.

    Although, i'm more impressed and thankful for the ladies who bake cookies for Sunday morning. That's a gift.
     
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  8. SBClose

    SBClose Tele-Meister

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    As a W/L I appreciate the heads up. I guess i usually find something specific to say in regard to what people bring to the table. Lead guitarist's tone, Drummer getting us through a tricky transition or vocals that were on point, and I ALWAYS take the opportunity to praise the keyboard player for leaving space for other instruments (if they do) as I know that this requires discipline.

    But my usual is, "thanks for your leadership" or, "thanks for helping the folks worship today". Is this more palatable to a player?
     
  9. SBClose

    SBClose Tele-Meister

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    I wish my pattern of movement allowed me to get to the cookies! By the time I wander back to where coffee is served (1/2 way through second service) anything to eat has vanished. "I have no one to help me into the pool when the water is stirred"
     
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  10. black_doug

    black_doug Tele-Afflicted

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    As someone who's recently retired I've had about a dozen bosses over the course of my career. Most were quick to criticize. Very few took time to give thanks or praise for anything I've done. It shouldn't be but that's just the way it is.

    One could argue that people should behave better in the church and yes, I agree. My observation is that change in behavior is slow, and often takes a lifetime, if at all.
     
  11. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    I think a big big part of being a worship leader/band leader is to get to know what makes the people in the band tick. A statement like "thanks for helping lead folks in worship today" would be infinitely more meaningful to me than "thanks for playing". What is really meaningful for the people who you play and worship with, might be different, but it sounds like you probably have a pretty good sense of what is meaningful to them. That is important in a team context.

    I just read a long article about a study that came out recently having to do with why people quit jobs. The single biggest reason, and it surpasses all other reasons by a very wide margin, is feeling unappreciated. In my experience, people disconnect from and leave worship teams/bands for very similar reasons.
     
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  12. beatnik

    beatnik Tele-Meister

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    S/B Close

    Praise becomes trite and meaningless when it is repeated as a rote phrase. To repeat thanks for helping people worship today each week, to me, would become like a catch phrase and I would quickly tune it out. But if that phrase was sprinkled in with an observation of something that I contributed musically, then the thanks for helping folks worship would go a long way.

    I have been a paid player at some churches where really cool things have happened during the worship time and the worship leader was off the stage and out the door before the echo of the last note had disappeared. Thank goodness I was getting paid because heaven knows there was nothing there to keep me around.

    Even at the home church, when I would be striking my gear, the WL was off pressing the flesh and hearing how great the set was. (When you pour everything out and don’t have anything come in, welcome to the desert).

    Thanks for playing. Thanks for getting up super early after a gig. Thanks for carrying your stuff back and forth. Thanks for years of work to play this stuff and make it look effortless. Oh, and thanks for wearing pants on stage.
     
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  13. GoldieLocks

    GoldieLocks Tele-Afflicted

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    I always feel weird when people thank or praise my contributions. I do hope to get my rewards much later in Heaven, my music making won't be rewarded: by my helping Worship WILL. For now: as long as my tone is good... I'm pretty blessed.

    But some people are not good at making small talk --- so anything is acceptable.
     
  14. beatnik

    beatnik Tele-Meister

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    Goldielocks,

    I understand the “treasures in heaven thing”. And I agree. But that does not mean that just because someone does something as unto the Lord that we should not enthusiastically show gratitude and appreciation.

    I subbed in for a period of time at a church that was aimed at those following the 12 steps. The pastor there knows just how to walk that line with regard to showing gratitude or honor or appreciation (whatever you want to call it).

    He makes everyone who serves feel like a million bucks and not in a way that will puff them up or make them feel like they are just another cog. He has a gift (encouragement perhaps). I feel like he understands that the folks serving communion are getting their reward in heaven but by golly, he wants them to know he is so completely grateful here on Earth for their 5 minutes of service.

    To that end and to finish the story, that little church of 75 people who have done their dead level best to destroy their own lives set out every week and feed a neighborhood of about a thousand people in one of the poorest areas in a major metropolitan city.

    They have embraced gratitude. They are thankful someone took them or forced them into rehab. They are thankful they get to carry the message. They are thankful for grace and multiple second chances. And they are grateful to be the widow who puts the last coin she has into the offering basket and gets to see hundreds of people fed for the week.

    Gratitude goes a long way. It will lift people up and it will carry the message into a withering barrage of enemy fire.

    So thanks for reading (and wearing pants if you are in public).
     
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  15. FluffyDog6

    FluffyDog6 Tele-Meister

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    You have described my feelings about my real job perfectly.

    Do I know you?
     
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  16. 985plowboy

    985plowboy Friend of Leo's

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    Wow... someone told you thanks???
     
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  17. preactor

    preactor Tele-Holic

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    A good word really does not cost anything but may go a long way in helping someone who needs to hear one. Why don't we give them out a little more?
     
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  18. Greg M

    Greg M Tele-Holic

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    In my life, I often find that if I feel something is missing in my own fulfillment-- if I stop and think for a few minutes-- I'll recognize something I've been falling short in myself. "Nobody tells me how well I sang that song" could lead me to "how often do I tell the pastor how well he did on the lesson, or how much I appreciate the folks that keep the church clean, or take care of the finances, etc?"

    We all want to be appreciated. We're only humans. I read this somewhere: Work becomes worship when we do it for the Lord. Keep working!
     
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  19. 65 Champ Amp

    65 Champ Amp Tele-Afflicted

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    As I mute my TU2, and put my guitar on the stand, and someone takes a mic for some announcements, I love hearing them say “That was good worship”. Because it’s not supposed to be about my playing. My wife will give me feedback on my playing later.:confused::D

    If they were to say “thanks for playing”, or even “nice playing”, I’d be tempted to say “who’s playing? This is serious business”.:cool:
     
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  20. GoldieLocks

    GoldieLocks Tele-Afflicted

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    I agree - commenting on musicianship is VERY SERIOUS business. I have a rule: don't talk music with people who just don't GET music.

    I was just on a 3 week Cruise Ship with my wife. The evening music entertainment was often HORRIFIC and similar to a high school talent show. But every night - People would comment about how AMAZING the musicians and musical performances were... My wife and I shared our EXPERT PROFESSIONAL OPINIONS (we've Performed, and attended over a 1,000 concerts in our lifetime). The looks of horror on people's faces were like we just sold their newborn into slavery. We no longer commented clearly on the music again. Same goes for Church. If you can't handle the truth: DOn't AsK.
     
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