Who uses a spray booth/ spray tent?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Slowtwitch, Sep 25, 2019.

  1. Slowtwitch

    Slowtwitch Tele-Meister

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    I've now finished 3 guitars at a friend's using spray gun, and just purchased a gun and small compressor.

    Now I'm thinking whether it's worth trying to setup a small spray tent with a fan etc.

    Do you guys find it necessary to have a booth/tent or just spray in a relatively clean garage on windless days?
     
  2. Wallaby

    Wallaby Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    Shop-made booth here, but I haven't done it in a long time.

    IIRC visquine and 2x2's were that main components.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
     
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  3. raito

    raito Poster Extraordinaire

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    I use a large cardboard box, only outside, and only when the weather cooperates.
     
  4. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    Like Raito, I made a "booth" out of a cardboard box (actually a guitar shipping box) but its function is only to contain overspray.

    IMG_0235.JPG

    Most of the time I simply take the guitar outside, put it on a low table that I can walk around and shoot it. I find I prefer shooting the guitar flat rather than hanging.

    I know I run a risk with electrical sparks and other issues but for a couple of instruments a year this has worked fine.
     
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  5. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    A friends wife used to do spray tans in her beauty salon. They used a small tent like thing for the customers to stand in. That would be perfect for spraying guitars in.
     
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  6. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    I only spray water borne products and a little de-waxed shellac and therefore, don't have a formal spray booth. I have a larger, open area of my shop where I do this work with the double doors open if the weather is appropriate for that. There are small tent setups that are affordable for projects like are the purview of this forum, but they alone do not deal with the ventilation needs, particularly for solvent based products like lacquers. It's just not a good idea to spray those indoors without proper ventilation and given the flammability, those ventilation need really should be handled appropriately. If I'm going to spray something like that, I do it outside which also limits it to warm weather.
     
  7. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    When I was painting motorcycles, I'd hang a tarp up under one of the oak trees behind my house. I'd just tie it off to the undersides of the branches so it was like a canopy. It was a little bit better than nothing :).

    Last winter I decided that I wanted to spray lacquer so I built this little contraption. It's pretty ugly looking, but it does the job.

    The guitar body is hanging there to give an idea of scale. It still needs a couple more coats before it's done. I'll do that later today :).



    IMG_0911.JPG




    As far as safety goes, always follow the proper procedures for dealing with hazardous and potentially explosive fumes, and use proper respiratory protection.

    Don't blow up or burn down your house, or endanger your or anyone else's lungs.





    g
     
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  8. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Holic

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    What material are you spraying? Nitro dries fast enough you can shoot outside in nice weather. Shooting inside a garage without a powerful exhaust fan set up (spark proof) is asking for trouble. You'll be dealing with overspray on all sorts of stuff. I'm in the minority here, living in Florida I spray outside pretty much year-round. Most importantly, get a real respirator rated for whatever you shoot. Lung damage from inhaling finish/solvents is irreversible (and leads to a horrible way to die).
     
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  9. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Poster Extraordinaire

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    I walled off a corner of my old barn for a paint booth. I put a small exhaust fan in. It has an enclosed motor, but not explosion proof. A couple of vapor proof fluorescents (also not explosion proof) and a 20x20" air filter in the wall opposite the fan.
    I've had the nitro mist so thick in the air that I had to quit for a while so the air could clear. Haven't blown up yet.

    I intentionally made the room too small to paint motorcycle frames. I've got some biker buddies who love to drink beer but aren't too good at restocking the shop fridge.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2019
  10. kafka

    kafka Tele-Afflicted

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    I'm going to build a spray booth for guitars, and then start giving spray tans in it.

    "Ooooh, I'm sorry. I thought you said you wanted it to look like you had a light 'sunburst'".
     
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  11. Mr. Neutron

    Mr. Neutron Tele-Meister

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    I use a "Portable Greenhouse" I got from Amazon. I think it's 9' X 11'. I forget exactly what size it is. I have a fan pushing furnace-filtered air into one end, and air/overspay/fumes escape out of an open screened window at the opposite end. Works good, but is kind of a pain to set up and tear down inside my pole barn. But it does keep the box elder bugs out...... ;)

    20190312_190437.jpg

    20190226_145652.jpg

    I put my guitar bodies on a narrowed 1" X 3" board at the neck pocket. I set the board on a little Harbor Freight work bench, and use an old boat battery to hold it flat when painting sides and ends.. I can "rotate" it 90 degs. to paint fronts and backs. Just hold it with my hand on the bench for that. This can sorta be seen inside the greenhouse deal.

    I paint other stuff (tables, chairs, weird projects, and etc.) for my wife inside this deal.

    There are definitely cheaper ways to skin this cat. This happens to meet my criteria for keeping out bugs, and letting fumes out. I do wear a 3M respirator with good organic vapor cartridges......
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2019
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  12. reckless toboggan

    reckless toboggan Tele-Holic

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    I just take all my guitars to the tanning salon.

    Pay the lady 20 bucks to load my favorite colour paint into the spray tanner and giv'er.
     
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  13. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Friend of Leo's

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    I use a similar setup. I built my own booth using PVC pipe so that it would be small enough to fit the tiny space I have to work in. I also have to tear it down when I'm done to avoid my wife complaining that she can't get to her gardening tools. I also use the same Harbor Freight workbench.
     
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  14. eallen

    eallen Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I do lacquer almost exclusively and don't use a booth but my shop has a strong enough exhaust fan that I don't have much dust floating around. As already said, lacquer in thin coats especially drys so quickly you have some flexibility.

    Whatever you use, make sure you have adequate ventilation and a respirator for the sake of your health!

    Eric
     
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  15. Skydog1010

    Skydog1010 Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

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    Garage shop and bonus room in attic. Attic for lacquer because of dry heat, garage shop for all other goo. Have compressors in both areas.
     
  16. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    I will say this -:)

    Having a dedicated space (in my case a spray booth) where I can spray lacquer year round is a real luxury.

    Now my main concern is humidity, and as I gain experience, I'm learning how to work around that for the most part with the right thinners and retarder.

    Always something new to learn about :).



    g
     
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  17. Slowtwitch

    Slowtwitch Tele-Meister

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    I was taught not to spray NC lacquer in direct sunlight.

    I'm also not a great fan of spraying outside due to bugs
     
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  18. K-Line

    K-Line Tele-Holic Vendor Member

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    Open air spraying is awesome. Fans just draw air in many different undesirable ways often times. I spray into an exhaust port that merely just sucks off the overspray. Keeps the finish cleaner than any booth I have ever owned.
     
  19. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    I have one I can set up.

    You need good ventilation; no pilot lights or other flames in the area; exhaust fans MUST be explosion proof (and installed by a licensed electrician in most areas); standard exhaust fans are very dangerous.


    And you need all the normal safety equipment - full coverage goggles (not safety glasses in a booth) and a NIOSH-approved cartrige respirator that has ben properly fitted - no beards. Dust masks, even with the little boxes on the front, are the same as inhaling straight lacquer.

    Again, the trickiest part is ventilation - clean air coming in, and one or two explosion proof exhaust fans. You DO NOT want to cut corners herer or with respirators.
     
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