Who coined this Telecaster term?

schmee

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Yep you're right! I have seen some olympics from the late 60's early 70's that are definitely more of a yellow color today, and under the pickguard they're still white-ish ;) It takes a longer time but yeah... it can and does happen. I suppose given enough years, everything ages.... I know I do! LOL!!!
My 98 MIM Strat is quite creamy but white under the guard.
 

24 track

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the precision was the same color as the jazz in 78' and is still under the pick guard

P1010007.JPG
 

archetype

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Actually, from what I understand, Leo went with the paints and finishes he used cause they were cheaper than the new fangled "acrylic" finishes, and plus nitro dries quicker to the touch so he could push em out the door faster.

I'm not sure what you mean by "acrylic,: here. Do you mean enamel?

By the time Fender was spec'ing a list of available custom colors, some of them were acrylic lacquer.
 

Telekarster

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I'm not sure what you mean by "acrylic,: here. Do you mean enamel?

By the time Fender was spec'ing a list of available custom colors, some of them were acrylic lacquer.

Yeah.... that could be what I mean. I might've got the term wrong but whatever the "new stuff" was at the time? As I understand it, there are a few rare Tele's out there from those days they call "white necks" if I recall. They basically never really changed colors and darkened, like most of em did. It's suspected that they were painted with the enamel? and not nitro due to some sort of supply issue with the usual stuff at the time they were made.
 

archetype

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Yeah.... that could be what I mean. I might've got the term wrong but whatever the "new stuff" was at the time? As I understand it, there are a few rare Tele's out there from those days they call "white necks" if I recall. They basically never really changed colors and darkened, like most of em did. It's suspected that they were painted with the enamel? and not nitro due to some sort of supply issue with the usual stuff at the time they were made.

Hmmn. No. I think you may be mixing some persistent rumors and folks' ideas together. I've never seen any documented example of a production Fender that went out the door with enamel on it.

Fender didn't have tight quality controls on several things, including the painting process. It doesn't take too much searching to find examples of guitars that went out the door without a clear coat. If someone was rushing to make a quota number, shortcuts were taken. If an old Olympic White Fender is still stark, screaming white, it probably doesn't have a clear coat on it.
 

fretWalkr

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I believe Fender started referring to it as butterscotch blonde in the early ‘80’s when the ‘52 reissue debuted. I think they only referred to it as blonde before that.

I always wondered if the butterscotch was Leo's version of TV yellow (the color that looked white on black and white TVs). It would probably have made sense in 52. By the late 50's, early 60s, tele's came in a true white.
 

Slip Kid

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I always wondered if the butterscotch was Leo's version of TV yellow (the color that looked white on black and white TVs). It would probably have made sense in 52. By the late 50's, early 60s, tele's came in a true white.
I think Gibson's TV yellow came out in the late ‘50’s. I remember reading somewhere that the blonde color was popular on furniture in the early ‘50’s.
 

dougstrum

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Most wood as well as the finish change color over time. UV is one big factor along with environmental factors.
My brother was a chain smoker, and had a maple neck that turned a most beautiful dark amber~not a recommended straining process 😨
The butterscotch blond was a lovely accident of aging~
 

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Hmmn. No. I think you may be mixing some persistent rumors and folks' ideas together. I've never seen any documented example of a production Fender that went out the door with enamel on it.

Fender didn't have tight quality controls on several things, including the painting process. It doesn't take too much searching to find examples of guitars that went out the door without a clear coat. If someone was rushing to make a quota number, shortcuts were taken. If an old Olympic White Fender is still stark, screaming white, it probably doesn't have a clear coat on it.

Yep ;)
 
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PCollen

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Actually, from what I understand, Leo went with the paints and finishes he used cause they were cheaper than the new fangled "acrylic" finishes, and plus nitro dries quicker to the touch so he could push em out the door faster. I don't think it was a factor in terms of the discoloration i.e. it was what it was. As far as the butterscotch name, I have no idea. I don't remember anyone using that term back in the day, but that's just me. FWIW, my 51 Nocaster that I built is 3 years old now, and I followed 51 spec as close as possible. It was stark white when first done. Here's a before and after to show how fast they can turn naturally, if one is patient. She's my #1 guitar and I've gig'd/played her regularly since she was built. She's also getting all the natural wear in all the right places, just like the originals.

When she was just finished and done
View attachment 942442

3 years later.... note the color diff ;) And she'll continue to darken as time goes on no doubt.

View attachment 942443
That looks more like the effect of the lighting under which those pics were taken. Bright white vs. warm white incandescent, or incandescent vs. flourescent.
 

Telekarster

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That looks more like the effect of the lighting under which those pics were taken. Bright white vs. warm white incandescent, or incandescent vs. flourescent.

Nope. I can assure you the pics are as they show the colors to be ;)
 

imwjl

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This just made me realize how much my acoustic made of traditional materials has changed color since 2009, and wonder what my V series Martin with what I consider poseur paint would look like now.

I didn't put to much thought to the 52 AVRI I had as butterscotch. My FSR '68 Thin Skin has darkened but not as much as my Santa Cruz acoustic understanding both are nitrocellulose type lacquer.

My understanding of the Fender lore is color and marketing were not so much on the radar at first.
 




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