1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Which of these two for my first Combo Amp?

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by Digiplay, Apr 12, 2021.

Which of these two for my first Combo Amp?

  1. 1) Fender Tone Master Twin Reverb.

    61 vote(s)
    51.3%
  2. 2) Boss Katana Artist MKII, with a Boss GA-FC Foot Controller.

    58 vote(s)
    48.7%
  1. CRMCRM

    CRMCRM Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    112
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2010
    Location:
    Stevens Point, WI
    I seem to recall that the USB port on the fender was only for updating the software and did not support recording. Not sure about the Boss.

    If I was only using it for recording, this is a feature that I would want.
     
  2. David C

    David C Tele-Meister

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    194
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2020
    Location:
    Coraopolis, PA
    I own a Twin Reverb ToneMaster and simply love it. Yes, it is what it is, no modeling, no built in effects except for reverb and tremolo. But it sounds great, just go for the Twin and skip the Deluxe, it's $100 bucks for another 12 inch Neodymium speaker that lists for over $160. You have the attenuator and the XLR output built in. Somewhere down the road you are going to add a few pedals, OK, so then your Twin is everything you ever wanted. Buy the Twin and don't look back. It's a great platform for other things.
     
    Digiplay likes this.
  3. David C

    David C Tele-Meister

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    194
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2020
    Location:
    Coraopolis, PA
    The ToneMaster has a built in XLR output. The USB port is for software upgrades.
     
    northernguitar likes this.
  4. Maguchi

    Maguchi Tele-Holic

    Age:
    57
    Posts:
    550
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2019
    Location:
    Lalaland
    Neither, I'd go for a Fender Pro Junior or a Fender Blues Junior. The tactile feel of the pick and fingers to strings will translate better to the speaker on a tube amp, and make you a better guitar player. The tone master is a modeler and emulates a tube amp. It will not respond as well to small variations in your playing.
     
  5. Digiplay

    Digiplay Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,363
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2019
    Location:
    Hoover, Alabama

    Will I be able to play these at the volume needed to sound good, but not keep the rest of the house up at night?
     
    Oxidao and northernguitar like this.
  6. Jimclarke100

    Jimclarke100 Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,973
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2009
    Location:
    Horsham, UK
    My personal choice would probably be the Twin. Well actually I’d prefer the Deluxe TM but that option isn’t in the shop.

    For the purposes of the OP though I’d most likely go with the Katana. It gives more options for recording plus it includes effects. For recording I’d want to have the ability to add flavour and variation to the sounds.
     
  7. Skydog1010

    Skydog1010 Tele-Afflicted Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    1,944
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2019
    Location:
    Slightly south and east of where I wannabe
    TM-TR, I love mine, volume 7 on I think 5 watt??
    But I love it.

    I don't need my ears to bleed to enjoy some breakup. Amazing how Fender did that.
     
  8. ping-ping-clicka

    ping-ping-clicka Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    72
    Posts:
    5,097
    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2019
    Location:
    left coast
    why buy an amp the Pod go sounds great. try a Neural Dsp plugin
     
  9. Digiplay

    Digiplay Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,363
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2019
    Location:
    Hoover, Alabama
    Tone Master Deluxe Reverb, Fender Pro Junior, Fender Blues Junior, Fender Deluxe Reverb, Helix, Helix LT, Helix Pod Go, a Neural DSP plugin, Joyo American Sound + an active D.I., PV Bandit.


    I have researched every one of those, and they ALL appear to be GREAT!


    That being said....................................................................................................


    See why this is so confusing to me? :)


    As of THIS moment, I'm starting to lean towards the TMTR, and either go with about 4/5 pedals, or possibly the Pod Go, which by my calculations, would end up around the same price ($480.00-ish) as the pedals.
     
  10. DeepDangler

    DeepDangler Tele-Meister

    Age:
    30
    Posts:
    489
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2020
    Location:
    Mequon, WI
    The Katana has more options and sounds great. Both amps have excellent clean channels. It’s subjective to say one clean sound is superior. More importantly, the katana has 5 useful channels and multiple effects built in that can be customized with a computer. What more could you ask for on a single amp? You’d need another 400 bucks to get an equivalent multi effects unit to pair with the fender just to have the same level of versatility.
     
    That Cal Webway likes this.
  11. bettyseldest

    bettyseldest Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,822
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2011
    Location:
    UK
    About fifteen years ago my wife bought me a Gibson ES135, as it would look good on a stand in the living room. On the basis that there is a blonde version available, and it would like very nice at home in the studio, I would go for the Fender.

    From a practicality point of view, Joyo American Sound into a direct box and your studio setup.
     
  12. Maguchi

    Maguchi Tele-Holic

    Age:
    57
    Posts:
    550
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2019
    Location:
    Lalaland
    Those 2 amps are both 15 watts, and one has a 10" speaker the other a 12". My BF Princeton reissue and Tweed Deluxe reissue are each 15 watts and one has a 10" the other a 12" speaker. I usually play them and get the optimum tone with the amp volume set at halfway (12 o'clock) and guitar volume at 60-65% up, with the door between the "music room" and the living room closed. It can be heard in the living room but it's not loud enough to disturb watching TV or surfing the internet. "Your mileage may vary." They are common and available amps, so try them out in a music store and see if the volume levels suit you.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2021
  13. wulfenganck

    wulfenganck Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,173
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2015
    Location:
    Seligenstadt, Germany
    Both are great amps.
    But the Katana seems to be more versatile and even if you're already "settled" with the musical genres you're playing, you might want to have another sound-option.
    It's also a lot cheaper.
     
  14. 2HBStrat

    2HBStrat Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,380
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2019
    Location:
    Four Rivers Area of Middle America
    Twin with pedals...
     
  15. Guitarman0824

    Guitarman0824 TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    8
    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2012
    Location:
    NYC
    I have been playing guitar since 1963. Have had various amps including a Fender Twin Reverb and Blues Junior (tube). These amps love to be cranked up, which is fine in a club, auditorium or theater. Since you will not use for these purposes, my choice was the Katana, which is more versatile.

    I almost always use my Roland Cube 10GX for home practice. It is loud enough, and it came loaded with 3 amp types, but you can easily download from a selection of 10 different types.
    It is worth considering, in my opinion. Check it out at your local music store, using your favorite guitar.
     
    Digiplay likes this.
  16. BlueGillGreg

    BlueGillGreg TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    97
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2013
    Location:
    New England

    Don't get an amp at all. Solid state amp digital amp tones and recording software digital amp tones are both digital amp tones. Use the digital sounds that are already in your software, or at most buy a software amp tone plug-in.

    The best use of time, learning, effort, and money to improve overall song recording is often to improve vocal recording. If any of the following are not up to snuff, improve them in this order: 1. Acoustic treatment of the room in which you're singing. 2. Your vocal microphone. 3. Your audio interface.

    Alternatively, you could just use a Shure SM7B for your vocals, since it generally won’t record the bad aspects of an untreated room. You’ll need a high gain, low noise recording interface like an Apogee Duet to boost the SM7’s low output. Total cost for Duet and SM7 is about the same as the Twin, and would likely make a better overall improvement on your recordings.

    Enjoy whatever you get!
     
    Digiplay likes this.
  17. JIMMY JAZZMAN

    JIMMY JAZZMAN Tele-Holic

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    563
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2019
    Location:
    Baltimore
    VOX AC15C1 TRUST ME...
     
  18. ashtone54

    ashtone54 TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Age:
    67
    Posts:
    11
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, CO
    I've narrowed it down to THESE two, and ONLY these two, so please help me out brothers and sisters, just as you ALWAYS do!

    Jerry, I’m sorry for immediately ignoring your decision to limit the responses to these two amps, but I disagree with your basic premise.
    If you are going to be using this amp for recording, and no live playing, you don’t need a club-sized combo amp. I’d recommend something like a Fender Vibro Champ, or something similar.
    A small wattage amp will record very nicely when turned up. It is easier to isolate, and running it at it’s “sweet spot” it won’t be so loud that it needs to be in a different room under a pile of blankets.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.