Which of these should I buy for lacquering some tweed???

Discussion in 'Amp Tech Center' started by E5RSY, Apr 16, 2019.

  1. E5RSY

    E5RSY Poster Extraordinaire

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  2. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I use Behlen instrument lacquer in a quart can with a brush. If I want to darken it I add a couple drops of honey amber dye. When using colored lacquer remember that each successive coat gets darker and you can end up darker than you intended.
     
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  3. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'd go with gloss and NO TINT in spray form. The tint is way too yellow. But I use Zinnser Shellac for tweed and a light cover of Nitro sometimes.
    50% non tint mixed with 50% tint in shellac.
     
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  4. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Friend of Leo's

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    I'd use zinsser sanding sealer to get the amp to color and then use any brushing lacquer or spray lacquer over it. Nitro - most of the solvent lacquers (minwax brushing, etc) are solvent. I have to admit that I don't really like most of the brushing lacquers unless you're looking kind of a thick hand done look. you can thin them, but spray is so much easier. If you're brushing any of the brush lacquers, don't do too thick too fast - I've had crazing problems with them (especially minwax brushing lacquer), which is OK if you're looking for that, but I never am. If they craze and then you cover them with a couple of thin coats, it does look kind of cool.

    If you have a fume sensitive spouse, do everything other than the shellac outside.
     
  5. Nickfl

    Nickfl Tele-Afflicted

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    Neither, use shellac or poly. You don't really need to spray either, you can do Tweed with a brush. Search the forums, there are a LOT of threads on various methods people have used successfully
     
  6. E5RSY

    E5RSY Poster Extraordinaire

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    Being that I'm working on a guitar case that is already assembled, spray isn't really something I want to tackle. I wish I could do spray, but I think the brush is the best option for this purpose.
     
  7. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Amber shellac...thin it some..brush it on. Tape off the latches, etc, of course. You don’t want to have to dilly dally around to avoid messing up the leather or hardware. Things will turn out splotchy if you don’t keep moving.
     
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  8. noah330

    noah330 Friend of Leo's

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    Zinser shellac thinned a little with a brush is what I have done with good results as well.
     
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  9. clintj

    clintj Friend of Leo's

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    Another vote for shellac. Minwax Honey Pine polyurethane is also excellent for sealing tweed and a good shade for the vintage look.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
     
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  10. E5RSY

    E5RSY Poster Extraordinaire

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    What should I thin with? Regular ol' paint thinner? Something else?
     
  11. noah330

    noah330 Friend of Leo's

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    Denatured alcohol is what I use. Don't use anything with too much water in it.
     
  12. clintj

    clintj Friend of Leo's

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    Alcohol is the solvent/thinner in shellac. Just buy a can of denatured and you'll be set.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
     
  13. Bruxist

    Bruxist Friend of Leo's

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    If you want to shellac a tweed cab, check this out:

     
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  14. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Another vote for shellac. Get the Zinser Amber Shellac and thin it about 50% (or more) with denatured alcohol. It will take a few coats to get the color right. But, thinning it with the alcohol does a couple things. It dries faster and harder than putting it on too thick.

    You might also want to put a couple of clear, or blond, shellac on first to keep the color a little more even. I learned that trick from this forum... I think @jsnwhite619 was the first one I read mentioning it.

    I've done a few amps and a few guitars and I think it really looks like old nitro finish.

    Here, the two amps on the left in back:
    [​IMG]
    The one on the right came from the maker in 'aged tweed'. It was done with one of the Minwax poly finishes... I don't think it looks near as good as the shellac. Too orange.

    This was a couple years ago (you can tell from the bumper sticker, if nothing else):
    [​IMG]

    The Therapycaster is darker and dirtier nowadays....


    The Stewmac vintage color is too yellow to me. You'd need to brown it up a bit.

    You could shoot clear finish over top of the shellac. Nitro or poly will go right over it. Shellac is basically the universal undercoating... Love the stuff. But, it is, and always will be susceptible to getting messed up if more alcohol spills on it. I've never had a problem (But, I also don't drink). It also would take a little bit of alcohol and a little bit of time sitting on hardened shellac to make any effect though.
     
  15. E5RSY

    E5RSY Poster Extraordinaire

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    Starting to lean toward shellac. And, since I'm doing a guitar case with it, not an amp, hopefully it won't experience the hazards of alcohol that an amp might.
     
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  16. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

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    What these guys said: either Bullseye Amber shellac, cut 1:1 with denatured alcohol, or Minwax Polyshades Honey Pine. The colors are different.
    If you use shellac, I highly recommend one or two thin coats of clear shellac (also cut 1:1 with denatured alcohol). This will help keep the corners and edges from absorbing too much.

    Whatever you do, thinner coats are better. Just be patient and keep the brush moving. Even if you have to do more coats than you'd like to at first, just keep them thin. Over time, you'll get the color just where you want it. If you put it on too thick, you'll be in trouble fast.
     
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  17. Nickfl

    Nickfl Tele-Afflicted

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    I don't know if anyone mentioned sanding between costs, but it's a good idea. I've shellaced Tweed without sanding and it's fine, but if you sand lightly between coats with fine sandpaper or a scotchbrite pad it will come out feeling smoother. Don't worry if it looks bad after sanding, the next coat will bring it back around, just don't sand after the last coat.
     
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  18. jsnwhite619

    jsnwhite619 Friend of Leo's

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    All good info here. Clear coats in the beginning help prevent bleeding under the seams and blotches. Sanding let's you end up with a nice leathery feel in the end. And don't rush extra coats or let it run. I had a drip around the corner on this last one. When I wiped it, turns out it had been there too long and "connected" with fresh coats under it. When I wiped it off, it took all the fresh amber away down to the clear. That took a WHILE to even back out again.

    And wear gloves! Shellac is nearly impossible to get off. My hands crack and bleed enough that I have no desire to have to clean them with straight alcohol in the end!

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
     
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  19. Urshurak776

    Urshurak776 Tele-Holic

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    @Axis29 OT a little..... I love that Tele knotty pine body! Did you make it? If not, would love to know where you got it. Making one of these is on my list :)
     
  20. saltyseadog

    saltyseadog Tele-Meister

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    [​IMG][/url][/IMG] Plus one for shellac. Here's a pic of my recently finished tweed amp after three coats of an 8oz cut shellac.
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
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