Where did Keef's nickname come from?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Nightatthehotel, Jun 14, 2013.

  1. Count

    Count Friend of Leo's

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    Oh dear! I have a real problem, I was born in Bromley, not far from Dartford, raised in North Essex, (on the real river Colne), with a mother born in Tottenham, then I emigrated to Australia. Keef became keyuf while mum always told me to say kaif and now it's kayyf. HELP!!!!!!!:lol:
     
  2. Tony474

    Tony474 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Sorry mate, you're a hopeless case and sadly beyond redemption. ;)

    Funny thing about the River Colne - I had no idea that the one at the end of my road was in fact imaginary. I swear it was there last time I drove over the little bridge...

    Actually it seems that Colne is a popular name for rivers. There's your one in Essex, our one in Herts flowing eventually into the Thames and another in Yorkshire. There's also Colne Brook, running not far from Heathrow Airport, Colne Water in Lancashire and a River Coln in Gloucestershire. Will the real River Colne please stand up?

    Meanwhile it's interesting what trev333 was saying about being (mis)taken for a Cockney. It's always seemed to me that Aussie speech has far more similarities to Cockney, or south-eastern English at least, than differences and it's fairly obvious to me that it's an evolutionary development of it (suggestions that it originated in Suffolk have been discredited). It's also interesting that to American ears they seem to sound much the same - I'm routinely accused of being Australian when I'm in the USA. Not any kind of dishonour (except during the Ashes or the Rugby), but in this case Not Guilty.
     
  3. Rhythm Thief

    Rhythm Thief Tele-Holic

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    Australian is basically cockney slowed down a bit.
     
  4. jefrs

    jefrs Doctor of Teleocity

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    Erm, 'colne' means 'roaring river' in OE. So like 'River Avon', of which many, it means 'river river'. ;)

    The Welsh go one better with 'Llyn Glasllyn Lake' = 'lake blue lake lake'.
     
  5. jefrs

    jefrs Doctor of Teleocity

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    It may sound like that to a stump jumper but it's not :lol::lol::lol:
     
  6. Tony474

    Tony474 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Sounds reasonable to me. Ta for that.
     
  7. TG

    TG Doctor of Teleocity

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    First time I met people from southern Essex I thought they were Australian. This was back in the '80s when I was fairly new to the UK (I'm Canadian) and not as able to identify regional accents as I can now...but it does make me wonder if the Aussie accent didn't originate there, at least in part.
    All those criminals from Basildon... ;)

    I can also understand how the Aussie accent would superficially resemble an east London accent to many North Americans. Some of the identifying 'clues' would sound fairly similar to their ears. The use of the word 'mate', for instance, and the fact that it's comfortable to be used in those accents in friendly context. 'Mate' doesn't roll off the tongue so easily with a North American accent.
     
  8. Count

    Count Friend of Leo's

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    Except that Basildon was populated after WW2 by, mainly, East Londoners so the current South Essex accent is basically the old East London accent. East of Cockney but West and South of real Essex. Aussie strine used to be similar to east London but has moved away from that. Regional accents seem to change with time, population movements, media input and the young wanting to be different. The North Essex accent, which had overtones of Suffolk, that I grew up with has nearly disappeared. The Aussie accent now is different to the Bazza McKenzie accent which is different to the pre WW2 accent.
    Whatever, KEEF is still KEEF, long may he reign.
     
  9. Breen

    Breen Friend of Leo's

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    Why is this thread 3 pages long?
     
  10. Count

    Count Friend of Leo's

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    So we can get it to 4.
     
  11. Mid Life Crisis

    Mid Life Crisis Friend of Leo's

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    Anything to do with Keef automatically has longevity.
     
  12. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    my friends named Keith.... I pronounce their name the correct Keith... with a th on the end, not an f.... as do most people locally.... even my Mum and Dad's generation would say keith with a th....

    I knew a family from Keighley, Yorkshire who moved here in the 60's..they had 5 sons. I rode bikes with them for over 20 yrs and still know them today.... they never said keef for keith... cause one of our mates was a Keith, a Blacktown, Sydney lad.. \

    in friendship or fights , behind his back, blind drunk.... he was always
    "our" Keith... :)

    saying keef is lazy english wherever you're from... methinks.... ;)
     
  13. Rob52

    Rob52 Tele-Holic

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    I grew up arround West London, some of the kids I went to school with would have pronounced Keith as Keef, they pronounced Maths as Mafs and spelt it that way too...
    Can't say that's why Keith became Keef, but I recon it's a fair guess.;)
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2013
  14. Tonemonkey

    Tonemonkey Poster Extraordinaire

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    Pronounced KEITHLY ..... ironically! (The correct use of the term, for once, on this board!) ;)
     
  15. Tony474

    Tony474 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Out of interest I've looked this up a bit and found various derivations. One suggests that "Colne" is derived from the same root as the Celtic "Glyn", meaning a narrow valley. Another view, concerning the Essex one and the town of Colchester, is that (and I quote) "the river name Colne, (also known as Clun), is British in origin and is derived from a British-Celtic conjectural root word 'Colauno' meaning 'water'". It's also been postulated that the place-name in Lancashire derives from the Latin "Colonia", a colony. Everything seems to point to pre-Saxon (hence pre-OE) etymology.

    Can't find any reference to the "roaring" part. Round our way the traffic on the M1 drowns out any noise the Colne may make...

    I love all this stuff!
     
  16. Tonemonkey

    Tonemonkey Poster Extraordinaire

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    I used to live near Cologne ( Köln ) .... which is Colonia in Spanish, obviously derived from Latin for Colony.

    Köln and Colne seem to be of similar roots.

    I like this stuff, too.
     
  17. Tony474

    Tony474 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Fascinating, isn't it? Talking of Germany, the Moselle joins the Rhine at Koblenz - which takes its name from the Latin "Confluentes", obviously meaning "confluence" (same word). The traffic there can be a bugger, by the way...
     
  18. surfoverb

    surfoverb Doctor of Teleocity

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    didnt he lose or gain an S on his last name too ? whats up with that? lol
     
  19. TG

    TG Doctor of Teleocity

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    Born Richards. Dropped the S in the 60s because he thought 'Keith Richard' sounded cooler. Put it back in the 70s sometime.
     
  20. bananafist

    bananafist Tele-Meister

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    As regards 'cockney' accents, has nobody heard Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins? Laugh? -I nearly did.
    As for Keef, its 'is name innit?

    Just up the road from me in West Wittering where Redlands is, if you ask anyone about Keef, you have to say Keith or they've no idea who you are talking about.
     
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