When you must really, really love your cat...

dblues

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76A51737-A257-44EB-923F-134051E04FE5.jpeg

“Don’t touch the tele”

But it’s an esquire.

“Don’t touch it!”
 

johnny k

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They call it 'Mal de chat' in France, the sickness of the cat, usually reserved for furniture but I suppose vintage amps come into that category too.
Funny, i have never heard that one. We use mal de chien to describe something real difficult to do.
 

Bendyha

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I want a cat, but my wife claims to be allergic.:(
I hate to see folks get a cat who might have to get rid of a cat if there's an issue.

That said, the Bengal breed of cat (which is typically four to six generations from an Asian Leopard Cat father) is known to be less allergic due to it's different constitution (in comparison, the typical domestic cat is prob 10,000 years and untold generations from it's wild ancestors). The result is that it has a much different "pelt" compared to a typical cat's "fur". Also, they love water so you've likely to be able to bath them without taking your life in your hands, which can greatly help with allergies.

But, allergies are a very personal thing and "who knows".

If you're serious about wanting a cat, I would suggest visiting some small breeders with Bengals (only). If your wife can stand being in a small breeders house with a half dozen of them as residents for a couple hours, she's probably OK with them.

I'll also add a caution though: If you've never had cats, starting with a Bengal is not advisable. They are super friendly, but at the same time have a number of behaviors what highlight their closeness to wild ancestors. They are very energetic, active, fearless, loud, demanding, social. They are not typically lap cats. Most breeders advise getting two so that they can entertain each other. They'll also cost you a couple MIM Tele's up front for a pair (plus typical vet and care costs later). But they are a barrel of fun.

Yep - Bengal.
I love cats, or rather loved cats, grew up with a house full of them, but then at the age of about 20, I started to get asthma attacks at night, which my (now) wife blamed on our 2 cats. I didn't want to believe it, but off course, she was right. Many years later, we inherited two outdoor cats from our neighbours who moved away. If I stroked them I would break out in a pimply rash for about 24 hours. Those cats are now gone.

So...about a month back, my son's partner asked if we wouldn't mind taking her Bengal, as they have moved from the land to an inner city, 4th floor flat. She came and spent the night with the cat, where I spent a lot of time stroking it, and even burying my nose in its fur and sniffing it........no reaction, and so it stayed. Now, one month later, still no asthma or itchy eyes or rash.

But, as NoTeleBob points out, A Bengal is not a normal cat. This thing has got an attitude. It is 5 y.o. and trained to do the tricks these cats easily master. Fetch, high-five left,right & both, sit, lay-down, turn in a circle (left & right), jump between stools, etc....................... and it is loud and demanding, has no patience, and take a swipe or nip at you if it feels ignored. If you are not willing to commit a lot of time and attention to the cat, or have to leave it alone for longer periods during the day, or don't have a garden, or neighbouring cats that like being terrorized, then maybe this is not the cat for you.

But if you are into cats....Bengal cats are amazing.
 
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ScottJPatrick

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Yep - Bengal.
I love cats, or rather loved cats, grew up with a house full of them, but then at the age of about 20, I started to get asthma attacks at night, which my (now) wife blamed on our 2 cats. I didn't want to believe it, but off course, she was right. Many years later, we inherited two outdoor cats from our neighbours who moved away. If I stroked them I would break out in a pimply rash for about 24 hours. Those cats are now gone.

So...about a month back, my son's partner asked if we wouldn't mind taking her Bengal, as they have moved from the land to an inner city, 4th floor flat. She came and spent the night with the cat, where I spent a lot of time stroking it, and even burying my nose in its fur and sniffing it........no reaction, and so it stayed. Now, one month later, still no asthma or itchy eyes or rash.

But, as NoTeleBob points out, A Bengal is not a normal cat. This thing has got an attitude. It is 5 y.o. and trained to do the tricks these cats easily master. High five left, high five right, high ten, sit, lay-down, turn in a circle (left & right), jump between stools, etc....................... and it is loud and demanding, has no patience, and take a swipe or nip at you if it feels ignored. If you are not willing to commit a lot of time and attention to the cat, or have to leave it alone for longer periods during the day, or don't have a garden, or neighbouring cats that like being terrorized, then maybe this is not the cat for you.

But if you are into cats....Bengal cats are amazing.

I have an allergy to long haired cats but currently have two Ragdoll's which don't bother me in the slightest, they have none of the fine underbelly fur which is the main cause of allergies, quite a few cat breeds are like this including the Bengal. I looked at Bengals but was told they like to climb and be very active which we can't really cater for, Ragdolls are more gentle house cats.

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Lone_Poor_Boy

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I have an allergy to long haired cats but currently have two Ragdoll's which don't bother me in the slightest, they have none of the fine underbelly fur which is the main cause of allergies, quite a few cat breeds are like this including the Bengal. I looked at Bengals but was told they like to climb and be very active which we can't really cater for, Ragdolls are more gentle house cats.

View attachment 912989


Very nice, artistic pic.
 

Les Paul lover

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They call it 'Mal de chat' in France, the sickness of the cat, usually reserved for furniture but I suppose vintage amps come into that category too.

Funny, i have never heard that one. We use mal de chien to describe something real difficult to do.


I'm French and never heard the expression mal de chat either.

Mal de chien does describe something that is difficult to do/achieve/obtain.
 

dblues

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That's a heck of a nice pic, but you know that. The shades of copper in the guitar, cat and the leaves with that nice neutral background.

thankyou. I always thought that was one of the better pics of that guitar. Probably because I wasn’t aiming at just the guitar.
 

ScottJPatrick

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I'm French and never heard the expression mal de chat either.

Mal de chien does describe something that is difficult to do/achieve/obtain.

I heard the expression used during an interview on TV with an old actor called Leslie Phillps, this was pre internet so perhaps he just made it up, never thought to fact check it. Now it seems I have perpetuated a myth, maybe we should call it 'mal de internet'.
 

loopfinding

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The squeamish may want to stop reading this post now. Controversial content below:

Silverface Twin? Have at it Fifi.

If stubbing your whole foot on a masonry brick had a sound, a silver face twin would be it.

They’re not going to get you decent conventional tones, but with a messed up fuzz and everything dimed they’re a one stop cheap solution for abrasive punk shows.
 

fiveightandten

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Vile creatures. Cats own the humans that host them. They’re very manipulative animals.

And in many cases, they infect humans with a single celled parasite organism that infects your brain and alters the brain chemistry so you’re drawn to cats.

It’s astonishing to me that people willingly keep these things in their homes. I’ve been a vegetarian for 25 years and cats are the one animal I legitimately despise, outside of some insects.
 
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