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When you move to a new place, do you adopt the lingo?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Dan R, Aug 25, 2016.

  1. Dan R

    Dan R Poster Extraordinaire

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    This thread may go along the lines of "when in Rome, do as the Romans do". I moved to the coast about 8 years ago. Everything about this town is very different from my hometown. The clothes, the attitudes, the lifestyle, the lingo, etc. Anyway, I've noticed since I came here, I have adopted nautical terms and expressions.

    Examples: That ship has sailed. Undercurrent. Cut of their jib. Different kettle of fish. Know the ropes. High and dry. Shot across the bow. My favorite: Ship shape and Bristol fashion.
     
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  2. waparker4

    waparker4 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I take a jawn from here, a jawn from there. But I'm not about to start calling marinara sauce "gravy". I take my steaks "wiz wit" and on weekends when I'm done work I get on 76 and go down the shore and have a water ice and a hoagie from the Wawa. What about youse?
     
  3. Chester Burnett

    Chester Burnett Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

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    Only after I make fun of it for a year or so.
     
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  4. 4 Cat Slim

    4 Cat Slim Friend of Leo's

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    I once worked at a company that recruited people from all over the U.S. and it was interesting
    when these people used terms that we were not familiar with at all, or their accents made them hard to understand. Using "shore" was one. We use the term "coast" in these parts. An Ohioan called a bell pepper a mango, and somebody from Massachusetts once asked where he should pahk his cahh.
    In turn, they were puzzled by our use of the term "fixin' to", as in "fixin' to go to lunch", and of course,
    "y'all" and (plural) "all y'all". I try to lose my regionalisms when I travel for business, but it doesn't always work.
     
  5. Grabsplatter

    Grabsplatter Tele-Holic

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    Well, as I moved to a place with not only a different language, but also a different alphabet, it's not been easy. My Bulgarian is still reasonably catastrophic. However, I have started to find that there are some things I can find words for in Bulgarian, that I cannot translate well into English. For instance, "so-so" is, in Bulgarian "горе долу" ("gore doloo" - literally "up down"). A neighbour asked me a few days ago how we are (it is, at present, pretty much the busiest part of the tourist season, and the whole of town is knackered). My reply ("горе долу, повече долу") translates literally into English as "up down, more down", which makes no bloody sense, and I cannot find a good way of saying it in English that doesn't lose something. "So-so, could be worse" just isn't the same.

    By the way, at the moment, the phrase on everyone's lips is още малко - oshte malko, which means "just a little more". September awaits!
     
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  6. telleutelleme

    telleutelleme Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Guilty Ya'll.
     
  7. callasabra

    callasabra Tele-Afflicted

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    It is natural to adopt the lingo for a variety of reasons, the most prominent is the ability to effectively communicate. Assimilation is another. And as 4 Cat Slim pointed out, it is sometimes necessary to leave your "regionalisms" in one region and adopt those of the region you are entering. Good salesmen do this.

    I am not in sales, but I deal with people from all walks of life. My wife has said that I will change my accent to match that of the person I am talking to. I will enunciate more or less, depending on whether the other person does or doesn't.

    I think it is natural.
     
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  8. MightyAnganok

    MightyAnganok TDPRI Member

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    Being part of a military family, I actually don't do it at all. I like that I'm different and while it is interesting to hear a different name for something, I prefer the words I learned.

    I will never call all soda "pop", nor "cola". But I also have absolutely no problem if others do.
     
  9. Kojer

    Kojer Tele-Meister

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    Arent you supposed to blend in?
     
  10. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Poster Extraordinaire

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    No, but I've been deliberately hiding my Southern accent from clients and business associates for years.
     
  11. Dan R

    Dan R Poster Extraordinaire

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    Yes, I'll tell you something about attire around here. You will see people in flip flops even in the Winter. I have seen some in flip flops in freezing weather. It's crazy to me.

    Nobody really wears blues jeans either. If you wear blue jeans, you look out of place. I have one pair of jeans for cold weather, that's it.
     
  12. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I've had friends and relatives move from Wisco to down south and get all twangy in their speech :rolleyes:

    Also I knew this chick in highschool who went off to spend a half semester in France, and when she came back she claimed she couldn't remember English :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
     
  13. src9000

    src9000 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I don't have to move anywhere to adopt another's speech or lingo. If I'm around you for any length of time, I will unconsciously start to mimic you. I can be embarrassing at times. And please, don't have a stutter.
     
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  14. TheDams

    TheDams Tele-Holic

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    When I was a kid, learning English in France, I used to learn british english...
    Moving to Minnesota years ago, I had to adapt :D

    So, yeah, definitely for me. I call my soda "pop", answer sometimes with "you betcha" and other local expressions...
     
  15. TheDams

    TheDams Tele-Holic

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    As a French native and French teacher (and using the immersion pedagogy), I can tel you that it happens all the time... I kinda forget my French if I don't use it for a while. Sometimes when I go back visiting my family, it takes me some time to really re-adapt to my native language.
     
  16. Nightclub Dwight

    Nightclub Dwight Tele-Afflicted

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    I have lived in Pittsburgh for 8 years now. Pittsburgh has its own quirky language, which linguists actually recognize as a regional Appalachian dialect. There are all sorts of words I never heard before I lived here such as yinz= you plural, n'at= and that. Plus, they pronounce regular words differently too. Dahn tahn for down town, haus (almost like hoss) for house, Eye-talian for Italian. Not to mention quirky traditions such as parking chairs, which are regular chairs people will put outside in front of their house to keep their parking space open. Do not ever move a parking chair. Ever. Bad things happen.

    At first I started using Pittsburghese as a joke because I am so obviously not from here that I thought it was funny to try to sound like a local. I did this mostly around my adopted family here. None of them batted an eye. That made me think it was even more funny.

    Now, the joke is on me. I find myself slipping into Pittsburghese unintentionally from time to time.

    Probably the most useful one for me is the whole jag off family of words. Instead of saying "jerk" or other, more salty words, everyone just says jag or jag off. My favorite adaptation is jag o, which of course is short for jag off. It gets the point across, but around here it is so ubiquitous that it is actually fairly family friendly.
     
  17. Paul in Colorado

    Paul in Colorado Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I come from places where people don't have accents. (yeah, right...) California, Arizona, now Colorado. But I like collecting regionalisms and accents and lingo. I store them like I do guitar licks and bring them out when I need them. I lived in Virginia and got good at the local rural accent as one of my neighbors and my roommate were locals. And then there were the attorneys at the law firm where I worked. And we had a Scottish barrister working there as well which helped me add to my "licks." I had a group of friends and we'd sometimes do a "southern" (yeah I know that there is no one "Southern" accent) accent well enough that people would ask us what part of the south we were from.

    If you're ever in another country, ask someone to do an American accent. It can be pretty funny.
     
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  18. soulman969

    soulman969 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Nah, my kids are all grown now and I ain't gonna adopt anymore.

    The Lingo's are just gonna have to watch out for their own kids. :rolleyes:
     
  19. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Silver Supporter

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    I used to stick out like a sore thumb with my cargo shorts and flannel shirt, but once I moved up here, I can even wear them to formal affairs like symphonies and funerals and blend in quite nicely. I can't pronounce some things correctly up here like the natives though, but I can say, "crick". I lot of norwegian, irish and Minnesota accent "twists" to the local vocabulary. Very interesting.
     
  20. String Tree

    String Tree Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I make an effort. After all, I am now in different territory. If I can't communicate, that is my problem.
     
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