When Did Everything Become An Investment?

toomuchfun

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When smart phones made us experts in everything except the important stuff we all took the bait

But could you survive a day without it?

I got no answers, just a bunch of questions.
 

Telekarster

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“The Million Dollar Les Paul”. It talked about the ‘58 - ‘59 Bursts being sold for higher and higher prices. The author’s position was that there would soon be a Burst sold for over one million dollars US.

Anybody heard of that happening yet?

I think I've heard of celebrity owned LP's of this vintage being sold for that and more, but as for those owned by John Q Public, 80-200K depending on condition I think. Reverb says the estimates are between 100-450K, or something like that. All I know is I wish I had bought a couple back in the day!! LOL!!!
 

Grandy

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Also, I'm thinking about pawning a guitar or two to pay a couple of unexpected bills. I'm glad I made the investment and bought them in the first place.
 

ghostchord

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You can sell your house and rent or you can sell your house in an expensive area and move to a cheaper area.
Around these parts, BC, Canada, many people sold their house in the Vancouver area when/where prices went crazy and moved to places where prices were much lower. Not sayin' you should but just as an example.
 

drumtime

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An investment would be an asset that you expect to increase in value. Hardly anything you spend money on is an investment. Even your house is a liability if you're still paying for it.
 

Drew617

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"Investment" applied in context of men's hobbies like guitars and cars, usually looks like justification to me, good natured willful BS. That or it's guys who honestly don't understand money and value - more dollars is not necessarily appreciation, so on.

Homes as investments tweaks me a little. It's a component of a retirement strategy, sure, but an individual gets a mortgage for utility first. Real estate investors - speculators - are screwing things up for a lot of families in some markets right now.
 

Greggorios

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Years ago I had a fishing buddy who was an extremely experienced and competent fisherman. He fished fresh and salt water, was into fly-fishing, surf-casting, you name it. He was also a creative and accurate fly tyer and built his own rods that stood shoulder to shoulder with any Sage or T&T. He lived, breathed and dreamed about fishing. At some point I mentioned that he could probably do well if he opened up a fly shop. I even offered to help him run it. I'll never forget his response; with a knowing and kind smile he simply said, "Well that's very nice of you to say but why would anyone want to take anything that they love and screw it up by adding money into the equation?"

There's a big difference between "investing" and simply being an educated consumer and a smart shopper.
 
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sax4blues

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Maybe those with the most toys wins. Nah
This has always been a thought. But I think this used to be more about the thing itself, the "toys", than some future sales value. I'm envious of the neighbors classic Corvette because he gets to drive around in a classic Corvette, not because he could sell it some day.
 

chris m.

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Sometimes an “investment” is just referring to reducing outlays in the future. For example, I might “invest” in a new energy efficient refrigerator for $1,500 that reduces my electric bill by $50 a month. Yay, I’m helping the environment! But also, putting aside npv calculations, in 30 months I’ve recouped my outlay and now the reduced electric bill moving forward is a reduced negative cash flow of $50 a month. So that “investment” does pay off.

So people who are careful with how they spend money can do a little math to see what expenditures make a bit more sense— minimize negative net cash flow in the long run.

Buying a home and upgrading it in various ways involves similar calculations. Yes, I’m going to live in it, but I’d prefer a situation where if I ever do sell that I’m likely to sell it for significantly more than I paid.

Guitars are similar. Yes, I buy it to play it, but I like it when I know I can always sell it for at least what I bought it for.
 

String Tree

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As best I can remember investments were business related: stocks which are business ownership, bonds which are loans for business purpose, property which was not your primary residence, commodiies which are used for business. I know there is much more.

Everything else was just stuff you buy and use. Exception was the primary home which was an "investment" in your future security through elimination of monthly house payment.

What triggered me was an article suggesting now is the time to sell your house because of possible peak. That would be great except for the question; where do I live? Same with all of our discussion of music gear prices. If I sell my gear what do I do for a hobby? Sell my used car for top dollar and ride the bus? At least I won't have a guitar and amp to carry on the bus, I sold those.
Yeah, like this!
 

oldunc

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Yep, that's cynical, but I agree.

What annoys me is all the talk about networking, like your friends are acquired resources for you to use.
If that came across as cynical I've failed as a writer; it was as dispassionate, if incomplete, a description of a deplorable and rather frightening reality as I could manage.
 

3fngrs

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My brother recently passed on a really nice (Gilroy Indian) motorcycle with very low miles at a good price because it wouldn't have a good resale value. I pointed out that I don't buy motorcycles for resale value, I buy them to ride. I also pointed out how I feel about keeping the mileage down to keep the resale value up with a little simile that I probably can't repeat here.

I should mention that he's worth a lot more than I am. Of course, I don't really care about money as long as I have enough to do what I want.

Anyway, I don't have any investments. I don't even count my 401k because investments have a chance of going up! That doesn't seem to be the case with my 401k which eats up 25% of my gross that I would be better off spending on lottery tickets and the dog track.
 

PhoenixBill

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I’m old-fashioned; I define “investment” as “purchasing something with the expectation that it will rise in value.” Buying your home could be considered an investment, since you have to pay for somewhere to live anyways, even though you’ll pay more in interest (if you borrow money) than the home will appreciate. Again, that’s because you have to stay somewhere, so it boils down to throwing money away on rent or buying a house. On the other hand, there’s folks who justify anything as an “investment”. Like my brother, he told me a few years back that they needed a new washer so they “invested“ in a $2000 Speed Queen or whatever it’s called. Huh? That washer isn’t going to make him any money, and it likely won’t last much longer than your basic $400 cheapo. They could’ve bought 5 basic washers for the cost of that one…(oh, it’s just him and his wife, no kids, and they’re in their 70’s. And broke.)
 




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