When amps have mic inputs...

Discussion in 'Amp Tech Center' started by schmee, May 30, 2019.

  1. Warren Pederson

    Warren Pederson Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    most of the harp players I've messed around with (just hobby jamming) don't have a clue about microphone speaker proximity. They point the mic at the speakers or cup their hand over the mic.
     
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  2. robrob

    robrob Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    The 5E3 Deluxe has Instrument and Mic channels. The only difference is the Instrument channel has a bright cap.
     
  3. GeoB

    GeoB Tele-Holic

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    As far as mic inputs I have really only ever seen those on keyboard amps. Because keyboard amps are adjusted towards PA functionality.

    The a guitar amp has a limited range or at least the speakers do, but keyboard amps require a larger spectrum for quality sound reproduction, and that is why keyboard amps can (sometimes) have mic inputs, essentialy making them a PA. Drum machines can be successfully channeled through keyboard amps and therefore some of the bigger keyboard amps out there ...let's say the 100+ watts range have mic inputs because those essentially double as a PA or can be used in conjunction
    with a vocal input, keyboard and maybe even some drums input or what have you.

    Keyboard amps can have some effects such a spring reverb Etc, and they can be used as a guitar amp but the compression is different along with the speaker range and although the guitar will come out very clean and very crisp it might not be what the guitarist desires because you will never get a Tweed sound or a lstack sound or a Brit sound out of a keyboard amp as it is a PA sound that dominates.

    I would look for an amp (PA) that also has an XLR out so you can go Direct to the board if you are amplifying your sound for a whole band through a mixer.
     
  4. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Yeah, most PA amps or Mic inputs are warmer sounding for sure. A small amp with an XLR is an idea, but really, these guys want that "honk" that only comes from the amp output and speaker, usually a light duty alnico with break up, which a line out usually wont get you.
     
  5. AJBaker

    AJBaker Friend of Leo's

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    That's something I'm curious about:

    When fiddling with amps with two channels (one brighter than the other, like a 5e3 or AC15), and trying to run a microphone through it, I actually found the bright channel made the vocals very clear and pleasant, and that an electric guitar had enough treble to cut through regardless of which channel I chose.

    Vocals into bright channel and guitar into normal channel just sounded 'right'.

    This makes me wonder: what are the sources recommending bright for guitar and normal for vocals? Was that really the convention at the time?
     
  6. robrob

    robrob Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    This makes me wonder: what are the sources recommending bright for guitar and normal for vocals? Was that really the convention at the time?

    Leo Fender labeled the 5E3 Deluxe for microphone in the normal channel, guitar in the instrument channel:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
  7. Paul in Colorado

    Paul in Colorado Telefied Ad Free Member

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    To quote myself, I got it backwards. Here's what I got from You Tube's own Uncle Doug...

    [​IMG]
    Highlighted reply
    Uncle Doug 17 hours ago
    Generally the microphone input offered higher gain, sometimes utilizing an extra tube or amplification stage to compensate for the lower output of most early microphones.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2019
  8. Ed Storer

    Ed Storer Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Mic's in the days when we'd plug them into a guitar input (1/4 TS) usually came with at fixed (short) cable and were high impedance (about the same as guitar pickups.

    Contemporary mics are low impedance and have XLR male outputs.

    Most bullet mics are high impedance with the 1/4 TS plugs and work fine in the Normal channel of a Fender amp or amps of the 60's era (and reissues). There are inexpensive XLR to TS transformers for plugging XLR mics into guitar input. XLR - TS adapter transformer

    Of course the frequency response of a guitar amp is much narrower than a PA's.
     
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