What's your hometown's claim to fame

Chester P Squier

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Jan 16, 2021
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73
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Covington, LA
In my previous post, I failed to mention the world's largest statue of one of one of the US presidents. The one that slapped Angie Dickinson.
 

sixstringbastard

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Mar 21, 2003
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Pittsburgh PA
My hometown of Greensburg PA is famous for a few things. The touch-tone telephone was first put to use in Greensburg in 1963.

Also, Paul Gilbert is the local guitar hero.
 

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Manual Slim

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Mar 21, 2017
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around the way
The town I live in now is the birthplace of W.E.B. Dubois who, I think, is probably, unfortunately, the last African American person to live here.
Western Massachusetts is a little to...uh...homogeneous for my comfort.
Small world! One of my college roommates was from there, so there's at least one other after Du Bois.
 

telestratosonic

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Alberta, Canada
I have given MANY position reports through Gander. Long nights flying West at .74Mach from Europe fighting the winds.
Interesting. In the sixties, on a starlit night, we could see those high-altitude lights moving across the sky. By this time, many transatlantic flights did not have to land at Gander for refueling.

Other than on commercial flights, the highest I've been is in a DC3. I was an air cadet in the mid-sixties (I'm 72). On a Saturday with good weather, we would fly out over the North Atlantic at low altitudes looking for foreign fishing trawlers along the route of the undersea transatlantic telephone cable.

The Captain would always let us have a turn at the yoke on the starboard side.

When a trawler was spotted, the Captain and Co-Pilot took over. The DC3 would come in low in a counter-clockwise circle with the port wing down low. Once in the desired position and upwind from the trawler, a (loose) bundle of a few hundred or so leaflets would be tossed out the little window either beside the Captain or the Co-Pilot (not sure which - it's been awhile - and we had to buckle up for this).

If it were a Portuguese or Spanish trawler (40-50 metres long), the fishermen would be out on deck waving to us. Soviet trawler? Not a soul on deck.
 

BryMelvin

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69
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Arivaca AZ
Interesting. In the sixties, on a starlit night, we could see those high-altitude lights moving across the sky. By this time, many transatlantic flights did not have to land at Gander for refueling.

Other than on commercial flights, the highest I've been is in a DC3. I was an air cadet in the mid-sixties (I'm 72). On a Saturday with good weather, we would fly out over the North Atlantic at low altitudes looking for foreign fishing trawlers along the route of the undersea transatlantic telephone cable.

The Captain would always let us have a turn at the yoke on the starboard side.

When a trawler was spotted, the Captain and Co-Pilot took over. The DC3 would come in low in a counter-clockwise circle with the port wing down low. Once in the desired position and upwind from the trawler, a (loose) bundle of a few hundred or so leaflets would be tossed out the little window either beside the Captain or the Co-Pilot (not sure which - it's been awhile - and we had to buckle up for this).

If it were a Portuguese or Spanish trawler (40-50 metres long), the fishermen would be out on deck waving to us. Soviet trawler? Not a soul on deck.
I only ever landed at gander once. Then only because of weather We couldn't land Sondestrom or Thule or Goose bay. I used to do quite a bit of arctic flying back in the late seventies.
 

telestratosonic

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Alberta, Canada
@telestratosonic post#270

What was the message on those pamphlets?

"If your fish hook gets stuck, please cut bait. If you try to reel it in you risk severing communication between two continents."

right?
Lol.

In a half dozen languages, the pamphlets said that they were bottom trawling in the area of the transatlantic telephone cable. I fished offshore, on and off, from 1974 to 1980 on 125'-150' steel trawlers. The bottom trawls (nets) we used were up to 120' wide at the mouth. They pretty much scooped up everything in their paths.

Our charts showed the location of the telephone cable. I assume that their charts would have shown this as well.
 

dickey

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Jan 2, 2010
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Location
Florida
Well, I grew up & lived in NYC till I was 45, no explanation needed there.
Now I live in a little country town in west central Florida...ain't famous for Nuthin'...'cept maybe stupid rednecks & bad driving.
 

Intubator

Tele-Holic
Joined
Feb 24, 2019
Posts
989
Location
Bawlmer, Merlin- Home of the "Mayor Shuffle"...
Baltimore.
Used to be steamed crabs, The Orioles, The Colts, a beautiful Inner Harbor with thriving tourism during the nice weather months and a historical districts Like Federal Hill and Fell's Point.

Now its Corrupt Mayors (one in federal prison now, and one who had stepped down for stealing thousands in gift cards for inner city kids), City Council members, and most recently the City States Attorney who is looking at 30 years in prison for federal loan fraud and probably other charges.

Oh yeah crime, which rivals Chicago's rate...
 




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