What's the go-to brass compensated saddles people are using?

PapaBeef

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I wouldn't be opposed to trying something else, but I've been using Wilkinsons for all of my Teles that have the vintage bridge plates for a long time.
IMO they're hard to beat or even come close to for the price.
 

Arfage

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When I had an American Special I put on the Stew-Mac slanted ones. Problem there is, unlike most tele saddles they were a full round rod, not flat on the bottom like most. So I had to lower the high E all the way down to get the action right. Barely worked, but it did the job. My two parts Teles have the Wilkinson bridges with the beveled saddles and they work great. All around quality of these is top notch.
 

Whitebeard

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Tjeppen

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Personally, I don't bother. If you want 100 % intonation, go for a 6 saddle bridge. I think it's all a lot of cotswollop because in the 50's and 60's those saddles didn't exist and the artist sounded great anyway.
 

drmmrr55

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Thoughts? This is for a vintage tele bridge plate of course.
Wilkinson works just fine for me!+
Tele bridge.jpg
 

yegbert

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Wilkinsons and others that have the blocky staggered break points like that look a bit chunky for my preference. They do seem generally easy to find, relatively cheap, and satisfy a desire for better intonation.

I've seen other brands of that style on the bay for similar costs.

The ones I have tried of that style are from RS Guitarworks in steel. I have a couple sets of them in my parts drawer now unused. I also have a set of the same style in brass made by Kluson I've never tried, they came with a bridgeplate I wanted that I couldn't get without them.

I have straight uncompensated vintage type 3-saddle sets that I use with no noticeable intonation issues. I split the difference in intonation between the pair of strings on a saddle.

Straight or compensated, brass or otherwise, use what makes you happy. :)
 

shallbe

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I've tried a bunch. I don't care if they look straight or slanted. I do not want to feel any adjustment screws under my hand and don't want to do any maintenance on the saddles. I play heavy gauge strings and notches are a no-go for me, so I stick with the round designs.

I don't like the Callaham or any of the Wilkinsons, personally. Took all Wilkys off my Suhr guitars over time. Brass is not all the same, and I don't like the soft stuff that notches. The sitar thing happens on the treble strings over time, which I know you can sand away, but I don't like it.

Love and use 5 sets of Glendales. Four are brass and the other is the groovy steel. Excellent.

I have a set of JB Kohlers that are no longer made, fantastic product.

I have an ancient set of Mann saddles that he does not make anymore and they are about 25 years old, no notches. That guitar has been played to death and never an issue.

I've got some mystery sets that intonate great and sound fine.

Also, the Forney brass saddles are wonderful.

I tried some Rutters stainless steel saddles. Nope. All fundamental, no overtones, and the cut was wrong under the treble stings with my action and neck angle. I would have to file them to make the buzz stop, so they sit in a drawer.

MANN



MYSTERY



GLENDALE



GROOVY GLENDALE



FORNEY



KOHLER

 

GuitarRod

TDPRI Member
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Sep 2, 2021
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Detroit MI
#1 has Stewmac-supplied barrels while #2 & #3 have Wilkinsons and the intonations are all A-1, especially the second one that previously had issues with the low E & A saddles of the modern bridge with the springs removed.
20210821_122833_HDR_(1).jpg
20211101_144736_HDR_(1).jpg
20211009_130341_(1).jpg
 

nopicknick

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Mar 4, 2012
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362
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Alabama
I've tried a bunch. I don't care if they look straight or slanted. I do not want to feel any adjustment screws under my hand and don't want to do any maintenance on the saddles. I play heavy gauge strings and notches are a no-go for me, so I stick with the round designs.

I don't like the Callaham or any of the Wilkinsons, personally. Took all Wilkys off my Suhr guitars over time. Brass is not all the same, and I don't like the soft stuff that notches. The sitar thing happens on the treble strings over time, which I know you can sand away, but I don't like it.

Love and use 5 sets of Glendales. Four are brass and the other is the groovy steel. Excellent.

I have a set of JB Kohlers that are no longer made, fantastic product.

I have an ancient set of Mann saddles that he does not make anymore and they are about 25 years old, no notches. That guitar has been played to death and never an issue.

I've got some mystery sets that intonate great and sound fine.

Also, the Forney brass saddles are wonderful.

I tried some Rutters stainless steel saddles. Nope. All fundamental, no overtones, and the cut was wrong under the treble stings with my action and neck angle. I would have to file them to make the buzz stop, so they sit in a drawer.

MANN



MYSTERY



GLENDALE



GROOVY GLENDALE



FORNEY



KOHLER



Awesome guitars!
 

Chicago Matt

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Woodstock
Another vote for the Nashville-made brass compensated saddles from Philadelphia Luthier:
Ashtray.jpg

This document is from when they were only offered by KGC
KGC_saddles.JPG
 

Sax-son

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Three Rivers, CA
Rutters and Calahams are exceptional, but are more expensive and unnecessary in my opinion. I like the Philadelphia luthier supply versions for most of my guitars and Wilkinsons for my budget guitars.
 




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