What's the deal with country music in Europe?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Zesty feline, Oct 15, 2016.

  1. Triton Thrasher

    Triton Thrasher Tele-Afflicted

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    Country is pretty big in Scotland and Ireland.

    Sort of country, anyway.
     
  2. Triton Thrasher

    Triton Thrasher Tele-Afflicted

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    [​IMG]
     
  3. xafinity

    xafinity Friend of Leo's

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    "country" now?
    or
    "real country"

    you punks git off Hank's lawn.
     
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  4. jjudas

    jjudas Tele-Meister

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    I'm glad country music doesn't exist in my world.
     
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  5. Triton Thrasher

    Triton Thrasher Tele-Afflicted

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    I prefer the term "bucolic and occidental."
     
  6. beagle

    beagle Friend of Leo's

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    I'll stick to proper English folk music (with a bit of Scottish and Irish thrown in), country gets right up my snitch.
     
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  7. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

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    I saw Albert Lee and his fine band of friends "Hogan's Heroes" here in Bussum about 10 years ago. On a Sunday afternoon... in a theater in the center of town... for 5 Euros. There were 20 people in the audience. So I wouldn't say that Albert Lee found too much here in this part of Holland!
     
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  8. Bendyha

    Bendyha Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I think Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot has got to take the credit with his first motorized pickup made in 1770. French idea "un peek-earp".




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  9. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I guess he had to use some kind of chassis to hold the wheels..;)

    truck/ute is stretching it... nes pa?... A steam wagon perhaps?
     
  10. LoveHz

    LoveHz Tele-Holic

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    On a press trip I once went into bar in a small town in Finland. It was Finnish country and western karaoke night and most of the participants looked very morose and well stoked up on hooch, although goodness knows how they could afford it. We were told: "Try to avoid eye contact and whatever you do, don't laugh." Let's say it was bizarre. We left after about ten minutes.
     
  11. Mid Life Crisis

    Mid Life Crisis Poster Extraordinaire

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    I could be wrong, but I took the post to mean that the UK folk music scene is bigger than the UK country music scene, not that of the US. I'd concur with this view if so.
     
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  12. Rayner

    Rayner Tele-Meister

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    There is a small following for old country here in England. I'm trying to find a band doing the more modern stuff which is proving pretty sparce. I've had quite a few replies to my ads from people wanting to do old (or proper if you prefer) Country and a few wanting to do hard rock with a pedal steel thrown in to make it heavy country.

    One of the biggest problems IMO is the accent, I've seen bands over here doing country (of any type) with English accents and it just doesn't sound right, then if they put on a fake accent they sound like ****s and everybody hates them. Folk seems to be popular at the moment.

    I have no idea why we haven't got more, Ireland has quite a lot of Country which seems to follow similar trends to the US etc.
     
  13. jackinjax

    jackinjax Friend of Leo's

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    Oh! I obviously read it the other way. Having re-read it, I'm sure you're right. In that case, wouldn't that be the equivalent to comparing the popularity of American Football in the U.S. versus Soccer in the U.S.?
     
  14. Flaneur

    Flaneur Friend of Leo's

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    Country music is alive and well in Ireland- distinctively Celtic but strongly influenced by traditional and modern American artists. It derives from the long-established Showband formula and some of the more successful artists sell a lot of records and tour internationally. This is quite a conservative tradition, with lots of glossy production and marketing.
    In the UK, the pickings are a little more sparse, for this approach. Younger players either tend to follow a contemporary Nashville formula, or style themselves 'Alt-Country'- taking their influences from a wider range, which might include Western Swing, Rockabilly... or artists like Steve Earle, the Band or Tom Waits.
     
  15. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

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    There is a thriving UK folk and ceilidh scene and many great festivals. Myself and my daughter play in various function and wedding dance bands doing wide mix of uptempo Celtic and European folk tunes. I do one that is full electric setup with drums, keyboards, electric guitar and bass. Lots of Cajun, bluegrass overlaps to be found. Common roots.

    Americana / Line dancing is around and there is the odd line dancing club but not as popular as maybe it was a few years ago.

    Certainly Ireland, as people have mentioned, has more of a US country style scene. Although if I hear Wagon Wheel one more time on a night out in Dublin I might lose it.
     
  16. Tony Done

    Tony Done Friend of Leo's

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    Exactly, and I was around when all that was at its height in the UK, but I had assumed that the OP was thinking of non-Brit, ie not English or one of the Gaelic language group.
     
  17. w3stie

    w3stie Poster Extraordinaire

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  18. Tony Done

    Tony Done Friend of Leo's

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    These Czech lassies have taken up American country music with a vengeance. :)

     
  19. chezdeluxe

    chezdeluxe Poster Extraordinaire

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    Last edited: Oct 16, 2016
  20. Tony Done

    Tony Done Friend of Leo's

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    That's an interesting historical distinction that I hadn't thought about before, but we tend to use the term "ute" fairly liberally these days, as in "tray back ute".
     
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