What's The Best Book You've Read Recently?

maxvintage

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An excellent book about Marine General Smedley Butler by Johnathan Katz, the title of which I probably can't post even though it was a phrase General Butler himself used
 

Mike Eskimo

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thunderbyrd

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Even if one is not interested in experientially pursuing the path he forged, there is a wealth of intellectual ideas worth contemplating in his writings imo.
i completely agree with you.

i discovered McKenna about 10 years ago. the field of interest he was involved with is one that's easily ridiculed and laughed off and many seem to regard him as no more than a clown. but i took him and what he had to say seriously. and i've been watching to see if his teachings become accepted in more mainstream thought.

it's not that i advocate what he taught, but that i don't think it was trash, either.
 
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John_B

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I do not read the printed word much anymore but I surf like ****. I have just reread "The Birth Of The Bakersfield Sound" by Lawton Jiles.
 

blowtorch

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Up early this morning, and watched a lecture from the UW from 5 years back on PBS with John McWorther as speaker.
I was so impressed (and entertained- I was literally laughing out loud) I ordered these :
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blowtorch

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Currently I'm diving into this
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If he actually wrote it, and didn't go the ghost-writer route, Billy is (maybe somewhat surprisingly to me) one hell of a writer
 

Weazel

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I reread Moon Palace by Paul Auster a couple of weeks ago. Now I am in search of his New York Trilogy, Leviathan and some other stuff.

I had a lot of Austers work in paperbacks, but they were sacrified in a moving process a few years ago.
 

VintageSG

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I recently reread Machiavelli's 'The Prince'.
Contextually, still ( sadly ) relevant and accurate.

I have also reread Swift's 'Gulliver's Travels' and 'A Modest Proposal' One of the few authors that makes me chuckle with every read. I still have no real idea how to pronounce half the lands of populace terms in '..Travels' though :)
 

howlandwolf

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Recording The Beatles, which is a staggeringly detailed, heavily illustrated 2006 book on every aspect of Abbey Road studios in the 1960s, from the personnel to the rooms, to the gear, before working its way through each Beatles album:

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This is my favorite book in the known universe. It gets retrieved in case of fire.
 

TokyoPortrait

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Hi.

A Man Called Ove, by Fredrik Backman. Not quite finished, but I feel safe to recommend it.

And, enjoying Patti Smith’s Just Kids. Part way through, but also feel safe to recommend.

Sympathy for the Devil: The Birth of the Rolling Stones and the Death of Brian Jones, by Paul Trynka was pretty good. Gives a different view than that given by Jagger or Richards.

By far the best ‘rock’ book I’ve read though is Route 19 Revisited: The Clash and London Calling, by Marcus Gray. Just great. Very in depth, yet not boring. Extremely interesting, in fact. And, includes enough of before and after London Calling to be pretty complete overall.

I don’t necessarily find Goodreads all that helpful / useful, but here’s some links anyway.





Pax/
Dean
 

Mowgli

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this does sound like a book i ought to read. i think i will order it.
It’s a disturbing book but many facets of life are disturbing. Avoiding reality doesn’t seem realistic to me.

IMO, it is important to learn about such things so we can recognize similar things/situations early in their development and do what we can to prevent them from flowering into horrific movements that harm and/or kill innocents.

Off the soapbox.
 

Mowgli

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An excellent book about Marine General Smedley Butler by Johnathan Katz, the title of which I probably can't post even though it was a phrase General Butler himself used
Gen. Butler prevented a coup back in the ‘30s which was planned by many of the Industrialists of the day.

He’s a genuine American hero. His pamphlet “War is a Racket” should be required reading.

Jules Archer wrote a really good book on the coup attempt and the BBC produced a 2-part series on it, too!! Few Americans know this history!
 

maxvintage

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Gen. Butler prevented a coup back in the ‘30s which was planned by many of the Industrialists of the day.

He’s a genuine American hero. His pamphlet “War is a Racket” should be required reading.

Jules Archer wrote a really good book on the coup attempt and the BBC produced a 2-part series on it, too!! Few Americans know this history!
Agree--the Katz book is excellent
 

P Thought

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I may show my (lack of) age here, but Handmaid's Tale was required reading for English when I was in school. It's a good book, but being made to write essays on it and do 'readings' in class just killed my interest in her work.
I can 100% see this as a high-school "study" book, and as I read it I can see how you might not have appreciated it partly because of that.

Since college days, and even more after "teaching" English in high school for a couple decades, I have tended to make a casual study of author, genre, structure, and style of the books I read. I don't think I'd choose The Handmaid's Tale for a high school class, but that's just me.

I'm half woman on my mother's side, and I think I'm about as good a feminist as a man can be, but I can't help seeing this story as a dystopian feminist manifesto, and dystopian manifestos never having been my favorite thing, this one seems a bit ham-handed to me. I might just be stuck on the Kingsolver/Atwood confusion thing I mentioned earlier, but I'm not loving the read, though I do plan to finish it.
 




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