What's The Best Book You've Read Recently?

Wyzsard

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Dominion by Chad Ripperger

(Angelology, demonology, diabolic influence, psychology, spiritual warfare, etc. All covered by a Thomist)
 

Tonetele

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A book by Michael Connelly about Harry Bosch and his mother's murder- explains Bosch's personality well - called " The Last Coyote".
 

aging_rocker

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Tesla - His Tremendous and Troubled Life by Marko Perko and Stephen M Stahl

This new biography focusses on his psychological condition, concentrating on his likely being bi-polar. Tesla had troubling hallucinations, long periods of depressions, and manic states, and had OCD.

A different look at a troubled genius.
 

basher

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Cool that this thread is still going strong after 2+ years. I recently finished Circe by Madeline Miller, which is a tremendous read, and as a result I'm now in the middle of Emily Wilson's excellent translation of the Odyssey.
 

thunderbyrd

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1. Book threads are my favorite

2. Long ago I committed myself to the habit of always having a book going and reading from it daily. I recommend this habit to everyone

3. Right now it's The Handmaid's Tale, by Margaret Atwood.
yep, them there literary threads are the best. yup.

i read like i breathe. mostly non-fiction of some sort these days. when i try to read fiction, i can see the tricks the author is trying to run on me and i just can't stay interested. this is not a happy development.

the only Atwood i ever read was a sci-fi trilogy that involved persons with giant blue penises. that's all i can remember about it. it must have been pretty good cause i finished it.

i think we need to keep reading threads going here. i get bored with the thread topics but i always want to see what people read.

i read books, or see movies that impress me, but i find it hard to articulate what i loved about them.
 

P Thought

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the only Atwood i ever read was a sci-fi trilogy

3. ugh

Dumb story on myself: I'd heard about The Handmaid's Tale, and was curious to read it because (keep reading) I'd enjoyed a previous book by the same author. Your comments got me to wondering, and I looked up the author's bio, something I try to do with each book I read.

Silly me. The book I remembered was The Poisonwood Bible, and that was written by Barbara Kingsolver, not Margaret Atwood. I'm early in the story still, but I was starting to wonder; this wasn't the writing style I remembered. . . . 🤷‍♂️

I'll probably bore ahead. I don't drop books once I've started them unless I really hate them. I don't hate this one yet.
 
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BigDaddyLH

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I may have to hand in my Canadian passport, but while I've started several Margaret Atwood novels, I haven't been able to maintain enough interest to finish any of them. It doesn't help that I lost interest in science fiction around age 15.
 

metalicaster

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I may have to hand in my Canadian passport, but while I've started several Margaret Atwood novels, I haven't been able to maintain enough interest to finish any of them. It doesn't help that I lost interest in science fiction around age 15.
I may show my (lack of) age here, but Handmaid's Tale was required reading for English when I was in school. It's a good book, but being made to write essays on it and do 'readings' in class just killed my interest in her work.
 

cyclopean

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Shudder went through a big "folk horror" jag some time back, kicked off by their excellent documentary on the genre "Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched" (And granted yeah it's movies but generally based on literature)

Anyway it caused me reflect some on it, and isn't all horror really at it's base folk horror?

Even these sci-fi-tinged things generally do deal with some sort of tradition/folklore at it's base...it almost seems to me to be another one of these labels/categories that is maybe not truly of much use


That Hellebore does look pretty awesome though!

If you’re in the US, you can buy it from stateside distros and it’ll be cheaper. I tried to buy a copy of weird walk straight from them once and the shipping was ten pounds.

Folk horror is a pretty specific vibe.
 

getbent

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Dumb story on myself: I'd heard about The Handmaid's Tale, and was curious to read it because (keep reading) I'd enjoyed a previous book by the same author. Your comments got me to wondering, and I looked up the author's bio, something I try to do with each book I read.

Silly me. The book I remembered was The Poisonwood Bible, and that was written by Barbara Kingsolver, not Margaret Atwood. I'm early in the story still, but I was starting to wonder; this wasn't the writing style I remembered. . . . 🤷‍♂️

I'll probably bore ahead. I don't drop books once I've started them unless I really hate them. I don't hate this one yet.
I dated a woman who insisted that I read the handmaid's tale when it first came out. She was kind of conservative (okay very conservative) and so I was kind of reticent to read it. But, I did and thought it was good and I thought 'hmm, why would this woman like this book.' All these years later and my wife and I watched the tv show based on the book. It made me think of the woman and I looked her up (didn't contact, just kind of poked on the internet) and, I'm even more baffled as to why she would have loved that book. Puzzler!

Barbara Kingsolver > Margaret Atwood
 

boris bubbanov

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Whose Freedom?

By George Lakoff. Lakoff is a linguist and behavioralist, and he dissects how the same word or words mean wholly different things to different types of people. Very time consuming reading, as it is very dense and requires a lot of thought and re-thinking. Do you believe in the nurturing parental role model, or is the Patriarch to be obeyed without hesitation? Might be useful at that Thanksgiving dinner with extended family, you can't get out of attending.
 

keithb7

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I seem to recall reading A Handmaid's Tale in about 1990. I have little recollection of the tale. I think I may have struggled to get though it. Seemed to have no lasting impact on me.

I most always have a book on the go and read from it daily. From book to book, it's fascinating. I've learned so much.

I am currently reading "Ford, The Men And The Machine" by Robert Lacey. I have heard interesting comments about Henry Ford. I wanted to understand further. Quite a story. I am enjoying it a lot as I like American Automotive history.
 

drmordo

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Marko Kloos - Centers of Gravity

Kloos is a genius at writing intense military scifi, and he wrapped up this series beautifully. And I'm someone who is rarely pleased by the end of a series. His other ongoing series is more of a Space Opera, but is also great and I can't wait for the next book.
 

cyclopean

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The vibe thing, I get

Labels can be dumb though.
It's like, trying to explain to someone why Iron Maiden is NOT "hair metal"
They’re more epic sounding and tend to sing about fantasy topics instead of partying.

Folk horror is like the wicker man, blood on satan’s claw, in the earth, witchfinder general kinda stuff.
 




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