What's on your workbench today?

crazydave911

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Feb 23, 2010
Posts
13,980
Age
63
Location
East Tennessee
Now the green of my shop 😁
 

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crazydave911

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Feb 23, 2010
Posts
13,980
Age
63
Location
East Tennessee
Some things can move along, switches for the Birch/etc,dye for the Yamaha and bottle squash seeds for uh, squash (banjo) 🤣🤣🤣🤣
 

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crazydave911

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Feb 23, 2010
Posts
13,980
Age
63
Location
East Tennessee
Supposedly banjo/Martin gourds. Hope to grow a couple for a skinhead banjo. Nylon strings and pegs and quite light. My 27" is more like a Gibson banjo weight wise, not really bad but could be better
 

guitarbuilder

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Joined
Mar 30, 2003
Posts
25,169
Location
Ontario County

mountainhick

Tele-Meister
Joined
May 2, 2021
Posts
485
Age
65
Location
Rocky Mountains
Figured I'd share a little repair project on a Squier VM precision neck.

I bought the bass at a steal, but then, with this problem, turns out not so much a steal! Glad I have the time and ability to make a project out of it.

duh, didn't check whether the truss rod nut moved. Neck had some forward bow, and turned out the truss rod nut was tightened to the point of no return. So after days using some penetrating oil and finally reversing the tip in my soldering iron so the blunt end provided more heat to the nut, it cracked loose. So typically when over tightened like this, there is crushed wood behind the washer. Often people just add washers, but there's another potential problem. This neck had an ebonol phenolic plastic fretless fingerboard. Doesn;t sound like a great plan to me, wood moves with humidity, phenolic doesn't so there will be differential movement which will bow the neck. After some deliberation I decided to remove the fingerboard. With the bow, a straight jig for a router would not work, as it would level across the bow, removing the fingerboard at the ends, but would leave the material in the moddle of the neck. So I figured I'd try freehand on a stationary belt sander. Worked a treat!

partial removal:

neckfix-1.jpg

Complete removal... dead flat, the wood re-alinged with the tension of the phenolic removed

neckfix-3.jpg



So then to reinforce at the truss rod nut... I chiseled out the channel and was unable to remove the washer, so attempted to remove the truss rod by opening a channel in the heel below the anchor. Didn't go well, when I was drilling out the anchor plug, some of the wood cracked away. Luckily I can still fix it.

-I pulled out the truss rod,
-routed out the heel of the neck so I can glue in a repair plug after the truss repair. Also will glue in a plug for the anchor hole. You can see that once plugged there will be very little visual impact, only the glue line at the heel end. The fingerboard will cover that side:
neckfix-5.jpg



-redrilled a new anchor hole 1/2" further up the neck
neckfix-6.jpg



-At the nut end I drilled about 1/2" deeper into the truss rod channel being careful to not drill through the skunk stripe to allow for a harder wood sleeve to be epoxied in as reinforcement. I only had a 1/2" shank drill extension, and 3/8" shank bit, so jammed strips of aluminum flashing into the extension socket, and used a piece of flashing taped to the peghead as a shield:

neckfix-7.jpg


-Turned said wood sleeve on my mini metal lathe:

neckfix-8.jpg

-Am working with acetone to wick out the penetrating oil that soaked into the wood, so epoxy will stick
-Will use JB weld wood hardener to toughen the sleeve.
-welded a new anchor to the truss rod. I turned the end of this rod, then mostly parted it, drilled a hole and opened a channel for the truss rod end to be welded. I did not fully part it, so I could square the truss rod to the anchor with the rod in a vise, and attach the welding clamp electrode:

neckfix-9.jpg

neckfix10.jpg




Looks like I need another post for more pics...
 

mountainhick

Tele-Meister
Joined
May 2, 2021
Posts
485
Age
65
Location
Rocky Mountains
Here's everything layed out in the new location. anchor welded on and weld ground flat:

neckfix12.jpg


neckfix14.jpg



I should receive the wood hardener today, and will post again when I re-assemble everything. Then time to make the fingerboard. Instead of more expense for a quality ebony board for fretless, I'll just use wood I have on hand and make it fretted. SS frets are all of $13
 

Medeltids

Tele-Meister
Silver Supporter
Joined
Mar 26, 2021
Posts
202
Age
61
Location
California
Figured I'd share a little repair project on a Squier VM precision neck.

I bought the bass at a steal, but then, with this problem, turns out not so much a steal! Glad I have the time and ability to make a project out of it.

duh, didn't check whether the truss rod nut moved. Neck had some forward bow, and turned out the truss rod nut was tightened to the point of no return. So after days using some penetrating oil and finally reversing the tip in my soldering iron so the blunt end provided more heat to the nut, it cracked loose. So typically when over tightened like this, there is crushed wood behind the washer. Often people just add washers, but there's another potential problem. This neck had an ebonol phenolic plastic fretless fingerboard. Doesn;t sound like a great plan to me, wood moves with humidity, phenolic doesn't so there will be differential movement which will bow the neck. After some deliberation I decided to remove the fingerboard. With the bow, a straight jig for a router would not work, as it would level across the bow, removing the fingerboard at the ends, but would leave the material in the moddle of the neck. So I figured I'd try freehand on a stationary belt sander. Worked a treat!

partial removal:

View attachment 1031707
Complete removal... dead flat, the wood re-alinged with the tension of the phenolic removed

View attachment 1031708


So then to reinforce at the truss rod nut... I chiseled out the channel and was unable to remove the washer, so attempted to remove the truss rod by opening a channel in the heel below the anchor. Didn't go well, when I was drilling out the anchor plug, some of the wood cracked away. Luckily I can still fix it.

-I pulled out the truss rod,
-routed out the heel of the neck so I can glue in a repair plug after the truss repair. Also will glue in a plug for the anchor hole. You can see that once plugged there will be very little visual impact, only the glue line at the heel end. The fingerboard will cover that side:
View attachment 1031709


-redrilled a new anchor hole 1/2" further up the neck
View attachment 1031710


-At the nut end I drilled about 1/2" deeper into the truss rod channel being careful to not drill through the skunk stripe to allow for a harder wood sleeve to be epoxied in as reinforcement. I only had a 1/2" shank drill extension, and 3/8" shank bit, so jammed strips of aluminum flashing into the extension socket, and used a piece of flashing taped to the peghead as a shield:

View attachment 1031711

-Turned said wood sleeve on my mini metal lathe:

View attachment 1031713
-Am working with acetone to wick out the penetrating oil that soaked into the wood, so epoxy will stick
-Will use JB weld wood hardener to toughen the sleeve.
-welded a new anchor to the truss rod. I turned the end of this rod, then mostly parted it, drilled a hole and opened a channel for the truss rod end to be welded. I did not fully part it, so I could square the truss rod to the anchor with the rod in a vise, and attach the welding clamp electrode:

View attachment 1031712
View attachment 1031714



Looks like I need another post for more pics...
Bass guitar version of open heart surgery...or perhaps perhaps a kidney transplant? Nice work!
 

bullfrogblues

Poster Extraordinaire
Silver Supporter
Joined
Jun 5, 2011
Posts
5,551
Age
71
Location
Southeast Florida
I will be watching you on this as I am about to start a double cut myself.
Thank you! this will be #2. the first was lots of trial and error, but I think we have everything sorted. 2º neck pocket angle to compensate for the adjustable stoptail was the hardest for me. And bolt on instead of set neck. Here's the first one.
LP special double cut pine.jpg
 

stormsedge

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Gold Supporter
Joined
Jun 5, 2012
Posts
6,931
Location
E. Tennessee, USA
I am signing off to mod my Monoprice 15w...well, a little anyway. Yesterday, I acquired a used Celestion G12H 30w speaker to replace the OEM Seventy80...and I'll probably roll the preamp tubes because I can.

Then, I may roll tubes in my 5w as well. Who knows what I may find?
 

telemnemonics

Telefied
Ad Free Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2010
Posts
34,563
Age
62
Location
Maine
Fellow TDPRI member I_make_my_own came over to help me get the foam insulation board down in the shop building project in final preparation for the floor pour that's happening bright and early Monday morning. I really appreciated his help for sure!


View attachment 1032522
I build or used to build houses n stuff but never saw this foam board under poured concrete?
How thick will the slab be?
Rebar in the pour?
Why the insulation, keep feet warmer?
Design stipulated by the garage builder?
Im extra curious because having sold my garage to my neighbor to save my house, I have a slim chance of staying but need a new garage. The one I sold is a trad build on a slab, and I know stuff like pole barn builds can be cheaper.
Site work and the slab is a big $$ number as is wood possibly vs synthetics or metal exterior.

Funny Im actually thinking of buying a race team type car carrier to move garage stuff into for now, building code does not tell me I have to park it 15' from property lines and if I hafta move it has wheels.

Curious what it ends up costing too.
 




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