What's on your workbench today?

telepraise

Tele-Afflicted
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Feb 27, 2017
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1,924
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66
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Tampa Bay
Hi Freeman, unless I'm missing something, I avoided the raised grain issue by pre-raising it. After sanding back the black, I wiped the board with a clean, damp rag. After it was thoroughly dry, I sanded lightly with 320, just enough to remove any fuzz. Then, I applied the red dye stain. I had no issues with raised grain. After the red dried (overnight), I applied the clear coats.

I like your 4-way test. I'll repeat the water vs DNA portion. I'm glad you take the experimental approach, but I'm not surprised sealing before dye didn't work out.

I definitely like the idea of more vibrant color. I keep thinking there's another argument in favor of water-based dye, besides the French polish scenario, but so far I can't remember it.

I take notes as I learn through building, but when it comes to finishing, there are so many variables, I often wish I had taken better notes at the time.
re: sealing before dye- I only do this with light coats super blond shellac, but only on spruce tops because they can get splotchy. I haven't found the need to seal maple.

I switched over from analine dies to Transtint several years ago and there is a learning curve as the dyes are intense. For sunbursting I mix the Transtint in a medium of acetone and retarder because I have them already and the retarder gives me more time to move the color around and blend the shades together (see mando above). If you want the traditional REALLY dark around the very edge, it's easier just to shoot it with a detail gun.

I seal in the burst with either shellac or sanding sealer. It's always magic when you put that first coat of clear on the burst.
 

moosie

Doctor of Teleocity
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Nice work Moosie! I see the scoring from layout tools. Handcut dovetails?
Thanks! Yes, handcut, with some machine assist.

Since this is kind of a woodworking thread, maybe some details will be of interest...

Tails are cut on the TS using a Forrest WWII blade with a custom dovetail grind. The blade is tilted to match the grind angle. A sled carries the board, which is oriented vertically. I use a 5" tall fence to help with stability on larger casework.

Cleanout is minimal and done traditionally, with a chisel.

Pins are scribed and hand cut, in the traditional manner. Except there's no need to get close to the floor (shoulder) with the saw cut. Blowing past the shoulder a little bit is an area of prime risk (at least for me).

Pins are roughly cleaned out with a coping or fret saw.

Even with all the different stuff going on, the heart of the process is the same: mark the pins well, and cut them perfectly. That's still done by hand. As always, in my opinion, it pays to be brave and cut right to the line. This way you get at least a partial fit right off the saw. Play it safe and you'll have endless paring to do, all of it fraught with risk.

Final pin board cleanout uses a trim router with a 1/4CL top bearing bit, either 3/8 or 1/2 diameter. I use an Amana bit. If you're doing tiny dovetails, you might need something smaller like a 1/8CL x 1/4" D.

See the router and jig below. The bit depth is set using the same marking gauge setting that scribed the boards. The bearing on the router bit rides against your bravely hand sawn pin walls.

The benefit of both the TS blade and the router bit are super clean and crisp shoulders (floors). And the TS blade also defines a very sharp inside corner where the tail meets the shoulder.

If you cut the pins well, the joint should fit at least halfway right off the saw (er router jig). If paring is needed, it's minimal.


This is the router jig to remove the final bit of tail waste from the pin boards. I don't have any dovetails in progress at the moment, so I mocked it up in the second pic. In retrospect, it would have been quicker to make an entire dovetail box, and finish it with a dozen coats of shellac. 😁 The fret saw already removed the top half of the tail waste. The router will remove the red X parts.

20220514_160306.jpg


20220514_160258.jpg
 

Moodivarius

Tele-Holic
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Northwest Ontario
We got the flamed walnut top routed out for my youngest son’s Thinline Tele build.

I first routed a flamed maple F-hole, 0.08 larger than the finished F-hole. This will end up as the binding of the F-hole.
D17F45EA-8865-4597-B62C-89F2ACDA564B.jpeg




Then routed out the pickups, trem, and F-hole in the top.
337F426E-13D3-4778-AEFE-189706504441.jpeg



Routed the top profile, 0.08 smaller than the body, for the flamed maple binding.
66B345C5-ABD5-4B56-9A30-5562B628FE15.jpeg




Superglued the flamed maple F-hole blank that was routed earlier.
24B00FE0-9462-4110-949C-55B3D5E5D9EC.jpeg




75578206-7CE7-4097-ABD0-FD391C8B29E5.jpeg




Now route out the centre of the F-hole to the proper size, to create a flamed maple binding.
03EC38A8-B7DA-4206-AFE6-73D378346EFE.jpeg




A bit of naphtha to enhance the grain.

DE863F91-9399-4F77-97CA-ACC762FF750E.jpeg



I’m learning how to use the CNC to do much nicer things now.

Came out pretty sweet.



Scott
 
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Moodivarius

Tele-Holic
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Wiped some naphtha to enhance the grain.

E6147861-565C-4CFA-9448-2E20B3D1E037.jpeg



Set it on the cherrywood body, and all routes lined up perfect.
6343974C-5A02-4963-9D35-4A5B00ED8E69.jpeg



Gold hardware is on order, but we put what we had on hand, to see how it looks.
2C393552-7435-460B-A5AA-6451B9CE6482.jpeg



8DF4FE41-946A-4456-B5BA-7C92790CADB1.jpeg



330972B7-779A-451A-99DF-8F29FE0BFD18.jpeg



It’ll look nice wit the flamed maple binding on the body.

I’ll post a build thread, once we start on the neck.



Scott
 

trapdoor2

Friend of Leo's
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Feb 23, 2018
Posts
3,242
Age
65
Location
Sauth Carolina
Playing with tongue 'n' groove tonight. Making a flower-box outta 1X6s. Rather than panel-jointing to get ~12" deep sides, I decided to put the Stanley #48 to work and fill the bench & floor with curls.

Box joints for the corners, I have a jig for the router table. Setting that up makes even more shavings on the floor.
 

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crazydave911

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Feb 23, 2010
Posts
13,592
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Location
East Tennessee
Dave,

I know you don’t like the Fender F-hole, but you must like this one just a little.
View attachment 983511

:lol::lol::lol:



Scott
You are correct sir! 😁 If I could I would give you lessons in the bane of builders, curly maple binding. I learned early on how to do it without bending/breaking multiple pieces. I once made a small rotary saw for cutting my binding. I learned the secret to curly maple binding is START out with small multiple pieces 🤣. Then angle and glue the ends into one complete piece. If you are careful and use basically 12:1 scarf joints, with curly maple you can never tell. Even I couldn't a week after I did it 😳🤣
 

Duggo

TDPRI Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2017
Posts
48
Age
59
Location
Mill City, Oregon
We got the flamed walnut top routed out for my youngest son’s Thinline Tele build.

I first routed a flamed maple F-hole, 0.08 larger than the finished F-hole. This will end up as the binding of the F-hole.

Then routed out the pickups, trem, and F-hole in the top.

Routed the top profile, 0.08 smaller than the body, for the flamed maple binding.

Superglued the flamed maple F-hole blank that was routed earlier.

Now route out the centre of the F-hole to the proper size, to create a flamed maple binding.
03EC38A8-B7DA-4206-AFE6-73D378346EFE.jpeg


A bit of naphtha to enhance the grain.

I’m learning how to use the CNC to do much nicer things now.

Came out pretty sweet.



Scott
Just smacked my forehead. As someone who always seems to do thing the hard way, I never thought of this. Having an "even a schmuck like me can do this" moment. Thanks for posting!
 

Medeltids

Tele-Meister
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Mar 26, 2021
Posts
165
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61
Location
California
That grain is simply over the top!

I flipped out when I found it!
It's ash, with an alder center core.
Some wood is what i can only describe as “painfully beautiful” in that, at least for me, the beauty of it can elicit a strong emotional feeling. Maybe that’s just a bit too esoteric for some folks but I honestly can get lost in the grain of beautifully figured wood. Proof of a power greater than ourselves? Maybe. I’m a sucker for all things created by Mother Nature.
 




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