What's on your workbench today?

hopdybob

Friend of Leo's
Joined
May 28, 2008
Posts
2,261
Location
netherlands
Thanks for your concern, but this is all approved under Australian Standards for ducting - as long as you have the ground wire running through (which honestly takes longer to sort out than the actual ducting).

Wood dust is highly flammable in the right conditions, but won't burn without a source of ignition. This system won't be used for anything that could generate sparks (it's hooked up to a lathe, a drop saw, and a bench outlet for use with a scroll saw and a belt and disk sander) and the ground wire is there to prevent static build up which could cause sparking inside the system itself.

My primary hobby is knifemaking, so I am very conscious about not mixing dust and sparks. I have a removable collector on a long flexi hose which I can use with my 2x72" belt grinder when I'm working on handles, which will be not just shut off, but removed altogether when I'm grinding steel.
Thanks for your concern, but this is all approved under Australian Standards for ducting - as long as you have the ground wire running through (which honestly takes longer to sort out than the actual ducting).

Wood dust is highly flammable in the right conditions, but won't burn without a source of ignition. This system won't be used for anything that could generate sparks (it's hooked up to a lathe, a drop saw, and a bench outlet for use with a scroll saw and a belt and disk sander) and the ground wire is there to prevent static build up which could cause sparking inside the system itself.

My primary hobby is knifemaking, so I am very conscious about not mixing dust and sparks. I have a removable collector on a long flexi hose which I can use with my 2x72" belt grinder when I'm working on handles, which will be not just shut off, but removed altogether when I'm grinding steel.
I have worked in a wood workshop and sometimes wood can get so hot while sawing little pieces can get on fire/smolder while traveling/falling in those parts were the dust collects.
so the fire issue i mention t was not about wiring ;-)
once, one morning, we came in the shop and it was full om smoke.
this time not something from the saws etc, but a cloth filled with Danish oil, crammed together ignited, and luckily in a metal bin.
we were lucky that day
 

hopdybob

Friend of Leo's
Joined
May 28, 2008
Posts
2,261
Location
netherlands
Hazards of NOT having a suitable bandsaw... I needed to resaw/bookmatch some maple for a top cap, and the board was way too wide for my wussy little bandsaw. So, I ripped slots in the board to the max depth of my table saw blade...
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one little advise.
i see that your guide bar is al the way passing the saw.
try putting it just a bit past the highest point of the saw blade so the wood has some room after it has been cut on that spot.
you have less friction when wood wants to move sideways, especially with thicker beams.
true story:
once we had some big log planks of iroko hard wood.
2 mtr wide, 7 long and 10 cm thick.
first we cut them in length.
one plank when sawn went extreme V after the saw-blade.
the second did the opposite and squeezed on the riving knife.
although the tree is dead, the planks have some energies left teas us ;-)
 

mrz80

Tele-Meister
Joined
May 1, 2007
Posts
398
Age
57
Location
Gainesville,FL
i see that your guide bar is al the way passing the saw.
try putting it just a bit past the highest point of the saw blade so the wood has some room after it has been cut on that spot.
Ah, I see what you're saying. Maybe clamp an auxiliary board to the fence that only reaches the center of the blade so that if the cut part of the wood wants to move it's got room. That's not a bad idea.
 

Telecaster582

Tele-Holic
Joined
Jan 24, 2022
Posts
978
Age
13
Location
Muskegon MI
My guitar teacher gave me like 7 guitars he wanted to work on so he could sell them to students who needed one but he said he didn't have time to fix them up. I've got a 2009 squier bullet strat, Beringer strat, Yamaha Pacifica, a Peavey raptor plus exp, another squier, a D'Armond les Paul, which he used when he played in a band, a spectrum guitar, and a awsome sounding Memphis superstrat. Before he gave me those to work on I was doing a partscaster tele. I'm gonna be busy for a while!
 

Pencilman

TDPRI Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2021
Posts
55
Age
34
Location
Benedikt, Slovenia
Not on my workbench but on my kitchen counter for various reasons :p.
 

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RogerC

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Mar 30, 2011
Posts
7,962
Location
Oklamerica
Working on a birthday present for a friend's 50th. He and I have been friends since jr high, and he and his family hold a very special place in my heart because they provided a lot of experiences for me that I wouldn't have otherwise had. One of those being taking me for my fist time on a sailboat.

I've built this from a block of sapele and fashioned the articulating rudder/tiller from some poplar dowels. I'm getting ready to start on the sail/rigging, and working out how to cut the starting shape I need for the sail is perplexing me a bit.

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hopdybob

Friend of Leo's
Joined
May 28, 2008
Posts
2,261
Location
netherlands
Ah, I see what you're saying. Maybe clamp an auxiliary board to the fence that only reaches the center of the blade so that if the cut part of the wood wants to move it's got room. That's not a bad idea.
i have learnt. wen you cut a thick beam in length, blade as high as it can, and guide bar just past the axel.
the blade in this position will push the beam downwards
wen cutting a board, blade just a bit higher than the board an guide like you had it on your pickture. you will have less tearout this way
 

mrz80

Tele-Meister
Joined
May 1, 2007
Posts
398
Age
57
Location
Gainesville,FL
Here's one that's a little different... our worship leader and I both like to spread out the sheet music, and we run shy of stand real estate. Sooo...
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More-or-less standard size for a "wide" music stand, 32", which is just wide enough for 4 pages of music if you overlap the edges.

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moosie

Doctor of Teleocity
Silver Supporter
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Posts
19,767
Age
65
Location
Western Connecticut
I'm not doing much in the shop at the moment, but hope to resume in the spring.

Here are some of the most recent projects.

I made this outbox for my wife, but I ended up keeping it for myself! So far it just has one coat of Tried & True Oil. Eventually I'll add shellec.

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I made 20 of these for Christmas gifts. Jeez they take a while... The boxes here are approximately 4.5 x 6.5 x 4H. Another batch were all about half that size. Finishing was difficult, as I wanted oil on the wenge top frame, and a wet-look sheen on the figured top panels. I masked and used 4-6 thin coats of super blonde shellac, then wet sanded just the tops, down to MM 6000. I got the idea for the handmade paper from another woodworker, and everyone loved that touch. Got the papers at Blick art supply online.

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Here are a pair of sipo mahogany nightstands I made for my wife - and she got to keep these.
Drawers are beech, with modern full extension glides, and Brusso pulls. Finish is ruby shellac. The tops received 3-4 coats of Waterlox Original, for a finish resistant to hot coffee cups, etc.
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