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What was wrong with Punk?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by offsideref, Apr 7, 2021.

  1. offsideref

    offsideref Tele-Meister

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    Punk rock was a godsend if you were born round about 1960. The singles charts were infested with novelty bands like The Wombles, for any favour, and actors pretending to be really old singing about how great it was before WWI. A lot of the ‘real’ music was complacent, self-satisfied and over-produced.

    Along came Punk. A lot of us kids interrupted our guitar learning, formed bands, and performed live, inflicting loud three-chord sweary music on whoever would listen. On the whole this was a good thing, although I speak as an inflicter and not an inflictee.

    When I was older, about 1979, I made up my mind that one of the principal reasons for a band to exist, is to play live music for people to dance to. Music that you and your partner could dance to. Dancing on your own is OK too.

    You couldn’t dance like that to Punk.

    So that’s my opinion, one of the best things to be part of is a dance band.
     
  2. Nightclub Dwight

    Nightclub Dwight Tele-Afflicted

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    I'm not a very good dancer. But after listening to Johnny Thunders, I realized that I too, could really shake 'em down. That's when I became the John Travolta of CBGBs. Even if the fanciest footwork I could muster was to hop straight up and down like some deranged jack in the box, it began a life long love of the three chord punk rock music scene. And I lived happily ever after.

    I think I understand what you're saying, but my experience differs.
     
  3. Dan German

    Dan German Doctor of Teleocity

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    I was born not just around, but actually DURING 1960, and I didn’t really find punk to be a godsend. Yeah, there was a lot of pretentious music, and don’t get me started on what disco was doing to pop music, but three chord thrash wasn’t the answer to this ex-folkie. (And let’s face it, the pretentiousness did not end because punk came along. Spinal Tap is proof of that.) Also, as a non-dancer, I care little for whether music can be danced to.
     
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  4. somebodyelseuk

    somebodyelseuk Tele-Meister

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    In the UK, it was a way to protest about the societal problems that existed here.
    What was wrong with it was the bandwagon got jumped on by the fashionistas and money makers, also, three years in, most of 'the kids' had become accomplished musicians and moved on.
    Punk was nothing to do with spiky hair and safety pins - The Clash and three of the four original Pistols had normal haircuts and never wore anything more outrageous than a leather jacket.
    The most embarassing thing about it is THE 60+ year old man (John Lydon) who still acts like an 18 year old any time someone puts a TV camera in front of him. He turned into a cartoon character.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2021
  5. Hari Seldon

    Hari Seldon Tele-Meister

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    I always had a very different idea about music: it's something you can listen to. Not only sth. for the body, but for the mind, too.
    Like Bach, BB King, Chick Corea and the Beatles.
    Punk? That's not so much about music.
     
  6. aging_rocker

    aging_rocker Tele-Afflicted

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    YES! Spot on. Born in 59, myself. Did my share of the 3 chord sweaty/sweary stuff.

    And spot on also. The 'punk' look as it's remembered today was not how it was for most of us at the time. Originally it was very anti-fashion, we wore dead man's suits from charity shops, held together with pins and stuff. We pulled our long hair up above our heads, hacked it off with scissors and poured beer on it to make it stand up.
     
  7. Nightclub Dwight

    Nightclub Dwight Tele-Afflicted

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    [QUOTE="somebodyelseuk, post: 10582670, member: 155204"
    Punk was nothing to do with spiky hair and safety pins - The Clash and three of the four original Pistols had normal haircuts and never wore anything more outrageous than a leather jacket.
    The most embarassing thing about it is THE 60+ year old man (John Lydon) who still acts like an 18 year old any time someone puts a TV camera in front of him. He turned into a cartoon character.[/QUOTE]

    Yes! And yes!

    When I was a young teenager I was going through that difficult time trying to find my way. I wanted to look different than the other kids around because I felt different. That was before I realized that we all feel different, duh...

    Anyhow, when I was maybe 14 I went on vacation to some resort in the Caribbean with my rich father. I came home with a yellow golf hat. I lived with my not-rich mother, and she remarked that I looked like an old guy with that hat. A lightbulb went off in my brain and I realized that I could probably get away with a lot more if I looked like an old guy in a golf hat instead of an angry punk rock kid. I decided on the stealth approach, to blend in. It satisfied my desire to look different, just in a way that didn't attract as much negative attention. I think that hat got me out of a lot more trouble than anything else I ever did as a teenager.

    As far as John Lydon...what a disappointment he turned out to be.
     
  8. That Cal Webway

    That Cal Webway Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    raucous can only go so far
     
  9. Oxidao

    Oxidao Tele-Meister

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    To me, born in '63, and being passionate on late 60's to 70's English and American blues and rock music, I started feeling off the mainstream Superbands, AOR, and that stuff.
    Beside Rock, I didn't really liked (hated) Disco, I did't know Funk. Country and Folk weren't my thing at that time...

    Then heard The Ramones, The Clash, NYD's/J.Thunders, Sex Pistols...
    That was exactly what my teenage body and mind needed to get wild.

    The only downpoint looking in perspective is that it took a long way for me to start appreciating other styles. But that's ok, it's youth.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2021
  10. Cesspit

    Cesspit Tele-Holic

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    Generally, my impression of punk was guys who couldn't really play or sing bashing 'songs' out. It was a cult, a fashion statement. There were some good bands and several excellent bands who rode in on the punk wave. Bands like the Police and Squeeze spring to mind.
    I never got punk so I guess I'm biased but I think it was a new generation rebelling against the established music scene. yeah the charts have always been rubbish in the main and I've never really followed them, I can see why kids wanted something different from that perspective.
    If I remember the whole thing was started by a fashion designer, Westwood? and Malcolm Maclaren was involved somewhere. I'm glad it didn't last too long, even old Bob Harris left the OGWT because of punk.
    Funny times.....
     
  11. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    Punk was more about attitude than music. The music just happened fit nicely with the attitude.
     
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  12. dlew919

    dlew919 Doctor of Teleocity

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    Punk was a reaction to disco really.

    I loved the notion that anyone can and should play. Music shouldn’t be closed off. You pick it up you play.

    I disliked the uniforms and the scene.

    I love the playing of Johnny thunders, joe strummer and Johnny ramone. And never mind the bollocks is one of the too 5 rock albums.
     
  13. Shango66

    Shango66 Friend of Leo's

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    What was wrong?...
    The “spitting” for one
     
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  14. offsideref

    offsideref Tele-Meister

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    Don’t get me wrong, when I wasn’t playing I did the Pogo and the Pile with my mates. I drew the line at the Dead Fly because the floor at gigs was usually filthy.

    But to me, these are a special kind of dance, more about athletic prowess (and having fun, sure), and mainly but not exclusively for young men. This kind of dancing, for me, is like the traditional folk dance in Norway where the young women left the floor, and the young men danced without them - and the unique part of the dance was quite literally trying to kick the rafters. The beams must have been higher than head height, but not much higher. All guys together, having fun, and presumably not taking part (as opposed to not managing to kick a rafter) counted against you, a bit, when the rafter-kicking dance was over and you went back to asking girls to dance. (No, I’ve never tried it, and I would hope that nowadays it is performed, if at all, by trained dancers or folk dance enthusiasts).
     
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  15. omahaaudio

    omahaaudio Friend of Leo's

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    NOTHING!
     
  16. Lucius Paisley

    Lucius Paisley Tele-Holic

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    It was dead, apparently. But there were a whole bunch of people saying it wasn't.

    Which was kind of punk, when you think about it.
     
  17. Lucius Paisley

    Lucius Paisley Tele-Holic

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    You could dance however you wanted to punk. "However you wanted" was kind of the number one point of punk.
     
  18. offsideref

    offsideref Tele-Meister

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    I agree with everything you said ^, not that my agreement should matter to you in the slightest. There was definitely an element of protesting about what was wrong with society, side by side with a protest (by musicians) against the “traditional” you’re never going to make a record unless you get approached by a manager, get signed by a record label, and take whatever they’ll give you out of your own earnings.

    After punk was mainstreamed, the protests continued, Rock Against Racism, Two-Tone, Ska, battles that we are still facing more’s the pity. As for the music, people started forming their own small record labels, and slightly more control of your destiny landed with musicians.

    Also, I love that a lot of accomplished musicians got “discovered” while labels were signing punk bands, the Blockheads are my current favourite example of that. They were on the Stiff Tour (I think it was) on the same bill as e.g. the Damned, but they certainly weren’t punk.
     
  19. offsideref

    offsideref Tele-Meister

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    There’s more to music than dancing, I agree. It may boil down to what, for me, constitutes “a band”. An orchestra is full of exceptional musicians, but on the whole you go to experience the music, not to dance, so they’re not a band. A manufactured boy band (who went for auditions, the way actors do), is not a band. And so on...!
     
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  20. offsideref

    offsideref Tele-Meister

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    I’m not so sure about that. TBF, I didn’t go to a huge vast number of punk gigs, but my recollection of the ones I went to, was that if there was dancing, it was pretty uniform... everybody pogoing, a few dead flies, nothing that said to me, dance any way you want to!
     
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