What was it like during & after WWII?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by ndcaster, Jun 27, 2016.

  1. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,794
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2013
    Location:
    East islip ny
    Doc the b-29 is now flying it might have been doc
    I have seen fifi lots of times i sat in her cockpit also
    I love world war 2 bombers
     
  2. Chicago Matt

    Chicago Matt Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    70
    Posts:
    2,826
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2014
    Location:
    Woodstock
    I was born in 1949. My memories of the 50's are the happiest memories I have. I suppose part of that is the way things were, and part of that is just due to the fact that I was a kid. Ever seen The Sandlot? That was my world. I remember a general feeling of pride, gratitude, and the feeling that anything is achievable. The adults that I grew up around just oozed that, at least in my recollection. Almost all of the men I knew, my dad and my friends' dads had served in WWII, had faced tremendous challenges, many had faced death. They had won the war and had survived. In my neighborhood, they came back to white picket fences and green lawns. They raised families in relative peace. Life was good and they knew it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2016
  3. Tele wacker

    Tele wacker Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    663
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Location:
    Wichita is nice.
    I was born in 1949 but my dad and 2 of his brothers served in WWII. 2 of my mom's brothers served in WWII. People did not call it WWII at the time it was going on. It was just referred to as "The War" according to my parents and many other people who lived through that war. I remember seeing B-29's and B-36's flying over our house frequently as we lived about 100 miles from a SAC Air Force Base.
    Other things that happened during WWII were rationing of gas, tires, sugar and some other items. Coupons were given in order to buy certain things. Everything went to support the war effort. The United States fought on 2 fronts. If the US hadn't entered the war, things would be very different today. I study lots of military history and US and world history. Lots of people can tell you nothing at all about WWII.
     
  4. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    52,245
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Location:
    Kelowna, BC, Canuckistan
    Better late than never.
     
  5. dkmw

    dkmw Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    64
    Posts:
    4,486
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Location:
    Florida USA
    My dad was a radio operator on a B-36 over Korea. He loved that airplane....

    He's been gone a long, long time but anytime I hear mention of the aircraft I can't help but think of him.

    When I became aware of the world around 1960, WWII was still fresh in my parents and grandparents memories. There was a certain can-do spirit that seems to be missing for some people these days. I've still got it, for the most part. I'm not big on nostalgic woebegone attitudes. YMMV.
     
    Chicago Matt likes this.
  6. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

    Age:
    68
    Posts:
    20,663
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Location:
    Iowa USA
    Admin Post
    Here it is

    [​IMG]

    It was a big brute.

    There is a book called 'Magnesium Overcast' that does a good job of documenting the history of the

    B-36/XC-99 and the Sweptwing Slugger aka YB-60

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Paul in Colorado

    Paul in Colorado Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    23,351
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Location:
    R.I.P. 2019
    I was born at the end of '52 so I have no memories of the '40's and didn't become all that aware until about '55ish. But being the youngest of five kids, I heard a lot of stories. My dad wasn't in the war as he said he was too young for WWI and too old for WWII. He worked at a hospital and went through nurses training during the war. (Yep, he was a male nurse. Something rare back then) He met my mom in nurses training (another nurse as was my oldest sister) I started school in 1958. I remember the cars. My brother and I were car nuts and could tell you the year, make and model of about anything on the road. We had a neighbor who won the Indy 500 in 1938 or 39 named Fred Frame and every year in Life Magazine Goodyear Tire would have an ad with all the Indy winners and we'd get excited to see our neighbor listed.

    I was also into airplanes and the space program. I'd get up early to watch those early Mercury flights. I wanted to be an astronaut. I watched a lot of TV. I wasn't crazy about school, but did pretty good until I hit my teens. I also liked rock 'n' roll. I had an older sister who watched Dick Clark religiously and a cousin who was a biker who turned me on to rockabilly. And I loved seeing this big lady with a big voice on TV on Sunday mornings named Mahalia Jackson.

    One of the things I remember most was that I felt safe. I'd go wander off, walk down the hill from where I lived and visit the hobby shop or bike shop. My dad would see patients after work (he worked for a a pair of doctors). Sometimes I'd go with him and I'd sit in the car and listen to the radio as he did his work inside people's houses. No one ever bothered me. Neon signs were popular. I remember the displays of moving lights at stores and bars and restaurants and billboards. My Grandmother lived near the GM plant in Oakland and it was always a big deal right before the new cars came out. The fences of the plant got covered and cars were transported with covers, so no one could see the new cars before they were officially released. Once in a while you'd get a glimpse of one of the new cars and they always looked so futuristic compared to the old fashioned last years models.

    Back to airplanes. We'd go to the Alameda County Fair every year so my dad could bet on the ponies and the family could see the fair. I used to go to the USAF booth and watch a film about SAC and the transport planes on a film loop over and over and over. My brother was in the Air Force, so that was a big deal to me.

    It was an interesting time to live.
     
  8. Silent Otto

    Silent Otto Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    364
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2015
    Location:
    3rd rock
    silly 'murikan, 'twas Russia that defeated the Germans.
     
    Tony474 and bsman like this.
  9. don71

    don71 Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,595
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Location:
    Central Missouri
    I have only the stories my folks would tell. They say things were tight,being raised poor. It seems you were either a farmer, coal miner (strip pits) or if you had a good job it was railroad related. We had the Katy,Mopac, and Rock island in this area.They often talk of the fresh in season produce or locally raised meat.

    A note about doc. This plane was ok'ed to fly just last week by the FAA, and not flown as of yet. Its been involved in a 16 year restoration in Wichita KS. This will bring the number to two flying B-29s. Also, was given approval to use Mcconnell AFB for take offs,landings and other testing. So, if you're in KS keep an eye out.
     
    P Thought and Toto'sDad like this.
  10. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    43,455
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Location:
    Bakersfield
    Thanks for the video Buckocaster51 I enjoyed watching it immensely!

    This is purely speculation on my part, but the time I saw the B-36, it would have been almost due east of me headed south by southeast. That would have put it roughly midway between the Nevada test site 65 where they used to study A-bomb tests, and Edwards air force base. Of course I wasn't aware of any of that then. It would only be much later in life that I would piece it all together. The plane though very high in the air was easily identifiable. I have no doubt in my mind the fellow who identified the plane knew what it was.

    The sound and shock of the plane flying overhead is not to be forgotten. As I said before, I also lived out by Pond California during Vietnam war era. A constant flow of aircraft came over the farm I lived and worked on. I can't count the times I've seen B-52s fly over, and squads of helicopters were a daily event.

    Edward AF base is a scary place to be around at night. Back in about 1971 or possibly 1972 I had obtained my Class A or 1 drivers license, and was hauling a load back from Arizona. Unfortunately, my permit was for weekdays, and it was Friday night and I had to be home so the machine could be in the yard Monday morning. So, I figured out a back road route to get me home. How I wound up there I don't know, a mechanic by the name of Truman was with me my route proved not very good and he was doing the navigating while I drove. Kind of a du, and dufus arrangement.

    Probably around midnight we were around ten or twenty miles from the AF base when old Truman said he needed to answer the call of nature. So I found a place to pull off and when Truman departed the cab of the truck I decided to make use of the opportunity too. Just as I started to get back in the Truck something flew over our heads pretty low that the best way I can describe the sound of was that of a very large piece of metal being torn in to that did not stop! Truman jumped in the truck and said lets get outa here!

    I don't know what it was, never heard anything like it again. But it was sure enough something different than anything I ever HEARD flying. If you ever have business in or around Edwards, I think you'll see what I mean.
     
  11. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    43,455
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Location:
    Bakersfield
    This is off topic by a long ways but a continuation of my story about the B-36. (sort of) Twice I've had to strip down to my underwear when driving a truck because I quipped a quick answer to a guard that I found quite humorous, but they did not. Once at Vandenberg AF Base, and once at the Techachapi Prison. They have moderators there too!
     
  12. raito

    raito Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,828
    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Location:
    Madison, WI
    No WWII here. My parents were too young, my grandparents too old. My uncle missed Vietnam by being the only son on a farm. My father missed the early part by being 4F. A couple cousins went (and were glad to go, given their stepmother).

    I'm not really a boomer or an Xer.

    What I can tell you is that on the street where I lived was an older father. He'd been in WWII in the Pacific. And he wasn't as old, and his children older, then I am now.
     
  13. Tony Done

    Tony Done Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    75
    Posts:
    4,970
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2014
    Location:
    Toowoomba, Australia
    I'm a Brit, born in '45, and I can clearly remember the after-effects of the war. Bomb sites, rationing, camouflage paint on the factories.
     
    Tony474 likes this.
  14. Ringo

    Ringo Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    8,100
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Location:
    Memphis TN
    Memphis Belle B17.jpg

    The repro Memphis Belle B17 flies out of a small airport close to my house every year, the first time I heard it I knew it wasn't the typical Cessna or Beechcraft, I went outside to see what it was, it was cool to see it flying overhead so low, (not my picture)
     
    Rod Parsons likes this.
  15. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    43,455
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Location:
    Bakersfield
    My younger son's mother in law was in Liverpool as a child during the war. She related to me that one morning after an air raid the Pharmacy down the street from where she lived (drug store) was just gone, vanished. She is in a rest home now, but lived a long and very exiting life. I have seen pictures of her, her former husband and Robert Mitchum together. She has lived in Scotland, and many different big cities of the world, and some of big cities here before settling in Bakersfield of all places.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2016
  16. String Tree

    String Tree Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    14,818
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Location:
    Up North
    That YB-60 says: B52 Coming soon!
     
    emisilly and Chicago Matt like this.
  17. slauson slim

    slauson slim Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,285
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Location:
    By The Levee
    My mom spoke fondly of the days from post-VJ day until I was born in 1948. My dad did not get back to the US until late 1945 due to injuries and illness. She said times felt good - post war glow and prosperity in LA, and all of her and my dad's brothers came back from the Pacific Theater. Married in May, 1942, she talked about picnics, ball games, going to night clubs and having my dad back, and buying their first house. Both of my parents came from large families that immigrated to the US in the 1910s to get away from wars - civil war in Mexico and Turkey/Greek conflicts - leaving everything behind. Dad was in the USAAF, joining in early 1942 after Pearl Harbor. Mom worked in a defense plant. WWII, a VA home loan and the money earned from the war, and the general US prosperity, moved them into the middle class.

    My ex was English - born in 1944, and her father was at Dunkirk, Tobruk and El Alamein, later doing occupation duty in Germany. She remembered a difficult post-war England with food rationing - Spam and bananas were rare treats - and getting an orange for Christmas, and hand-me-down clothes from relatives.
     
    Chicago Matt likes this.
  18. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Posts:
    16,579
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2006
    Location:
    Iowa City, IA
    Dec. 31, 1952 is my birthdate. Our mutual friend, Dan, is somewhere in mid-Dec. Where do you fit in?

    Similar experiences growing up as you. Our town was pretty weird, though, since our fathers all worked at the Manhattan Project's Hanford Area. The town was built by the Army Corps of Engineers (not the homes) and governed by the Atomic Energy Commission in partnership with DuPont and later GE. A lot of money went into that town, and a generally egalitarian social structure was promoted as a way to make staying in the job more appealing (which help reduce turnover and problems related to security).

    Popular music became too diluted for me to enjoy after 1968.
     
  19. radiocaster

    radiocaster Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,454
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2015
    Location:
    europe
    I've heard from my mom, it was horrible, bombs everywhere, rubble, dead bodies, escaping to the countryside to avoid bombings.

    If you're into that type of stuff, I would recommend Syria as a pleasant vacation destination.
     
  20. CLPeterman

    CLPeterman TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    42
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2016
    Location:
    East Tennessee
    So a bit off topic, but...

    I wasn't around back then (obviously), but I have a whole bunch of tech from back then I've been digging through to clean up the shop. If anyone is interested in helping me identify it/know anything. Not all information is on the internet.

    Like this thing, for instance. It is (I believe) a radio made by Collins that actually went outside the plane. I even think it did side band. 201836_1932069578597_2960614_o(1).jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2016
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.