What vintage american muscle car had good handling?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by homesick345, Feb 9, 2016.

  1. supersoldier71

    supersoldier71 Tele-Holic

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    The obvious answer is NONE, when compared to modern cars, but there are cars that handled well for their time.

    Tires were crap (comparatively), but even the lowly Corvair, (Ralph Nader notwithstanding) could handle a twisty road with aplomb.

    As could Shelby Cobras.

    And Shelby GT-350s.

    Depends on whether we're just talking American cars in the 60s, American Muscle Cars, Pony Cars or Sports Cars.

    Hell the GT-40 and the Daytona Coupe both won LeMans, beating Ferrari I think.
     
  2. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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  3. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    According to Wiki: "In 1932, Ferdinand Porsche designed a Grand Prix racing car for the Auto Union company. The high power of the design caused one of the rear wheels to experience excessive wheel spin at any speed up to 100 mph (160 km/h). In 1935, Porsche commissioned the engineering firm ZF to design a limited-slip differential to improve performance.[citation needed] The ZF "sliding pins and cams" became available,[1] and one example was the Type B-70 for early VWs."

    Full disclosure: Even though I've been a VW/Porsche junkie for a long time after my GTO and hot rod years ... I drive old Jeeps and ride old Harleys today with my need for speed much lower on the priority list. They both feel like your screamin' at 70 mph. ;)
     
  4. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Sunbeam Tiger
     
  5. bchaffin72

    bchaffin72 Friend of Leo's

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    I remember Corvairs well. My grandfather had several. Sadly, I never got to finish the one I was building up. A '62.

    They were actually co-designed by Porsche, who got one of each year as part of the deal. And he'd drive them too!
     
  6. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    A guy named Hendrik I knew had both the Dodge and Plymouth versions of these speedway homologations - at the same time.

    Each of them was inferior to a well motored Satellite or Charger until you got it up over 85 mph; only then did the bodywork start paying for itself. Best I could tell, at least. The track cars had the staggers and were set up to turn - best I know the ones bought at the Dealer were symmetrical tired and set up to pass State inspection.
     
  7. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Very cool but not Muscle Cars.

    Remember, these things were a handful with only the C.I. 260 Ford small block. The versions with the 289 were a real hoot but that's one of the smaller motors you might've gotten in your midsized or full size Ford sedan or wagon.

    The muscle car definition envisions a typical American sedan, with a really large or midsized high output motor with a transmission and drive train that could handle that output.

    Taking an Alpine and dropping a small block in it was the Everyman's Cobra type of deal - not a bad concept but for sure a different one.
     
  8. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    The 1957 Chrysler 300C, onward to the 300J in '63. After which it got detuned and thus just sedan-ized.

    Mighty motors. Ram induction on some, hemi's on the '57s & '58s, then even more torquey wedge-heads.

    Torsion-Aire suspension (torson bars, beefed up for '58 onward).

    Not nimble-small, but the relatively long wheel base and wide tracking + torsion-bar suspension = a lot more stability on turns and with braking.

    And also, until '63, beautifully styled. The '57, along with all '57 Chryslers, is just gorgeous.
     

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  9. Honest Charley

    Honest Charley Tele-Holic

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    Driving stinkingly fast is not only about HP and handling. It is as much about brakes.
    Not very many of even todays cars can do more than a couple of laps at full throttle round a twisty race track. They pit with cooked brakes. Imaging the force braking a 4000 lbs muscle car from 100 mph to 50 mph twenty times per lap... and not all of them had disc brakes. :)

    Progress is still a good thing.
     
  10. HotRodSteve

    HotRodSteve Friend of Leo's

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    This is what the original Challengers did best.

     
  11. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  12. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Every Aussie car of that era reeks of "Mad Max"... and that's a GOOD thing!:lol:
     
  13. Zepfan

    Zepfan Poster Extraordinaire

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    The big mistake is comparing Vintage Car handling to modern standards. All Vintage Cars handled very good in their day.
    The great handling Vintage Muscle Cars in America would be the Mustangs, Camero/Z-28/Firebird/Trans AM and Corvettes.
     
  14. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I had one of these way back when. 1977 308 V8 running on propane, 350 TH and LSD rear end.

    Handled like it was on rails.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. JayJ

    JayJ Tele-Afflicted

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    Let's see if we cross into Bogan territory... :lol:
     
  16. gypsy jim

    gypsy jim Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    Agreed ^^
    My Camaro takes the turns just fine.
     

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  17. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Drove the Hardtop version of that SS Camaro, Jim. Nice, nice car, but did not handle as good as some of the other contemporary cars. Pale green, black vinyl top. Narrower stock wheels, early radials. I doubt this one was a stinker, since the man who bought it (my friend's dad) was one of the foremen at the Tonawanda engine plant.
     
  18. tomkatf

    tomkatf Tele-Afflicted

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    Car and Driver did a road course test of 6 of the most popular muscle cars c.1966 and came to that same conclusion... the 442 was the best at the time... The article was pretty funny...

    T
     

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  19. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Friend of Leo's

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    Camaros was ok 67 to 69
     
  20. JayJ

    JayJ Tele-Afflicted

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    Masten Gregory was a certified nutcase. This was a man who decided to jump out of his race car not once but twice and not get injured.
     
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