What vintage american muscle car had good handling?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by homesick345, Feb 9, 2016.

  1. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Another thing to consider is the engine oiling system. The engine oil in a muscle car V-8 from the factory actually begins to starve from lubrication in long turns because the oil moves to the side away from the oil pump pick up (hey, a guitar term), whereas even an old stock 1964 Porsche 911 uses what is referred to as a "dry sump" oil system, which is basically what every road race car today uses to keep the engine well lubricated during hard cornering.
     
  2. bchaffin72

    bchaffin72 Friend of Leo's

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    I kind of throw my vote in for none. They could be made to handle better, and some handleed a bit better than others, from the factory, but that wsn't their main purpose. Those old muscle cars were all about the horsepower. Some of them did have factory suspension upgrades as options. Something like a Charger R/T(Road and Track) had stiffer torsion bars and tighter suspension. None of the big American cars I owned held a candle to my 73 Audi Fox, handling wise. But they sure could go. :D
     
  3. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I'd be curious to see the part of the discussion that applies to cost of cars at the time. It seems that US cars were fairly reasonable for the horsepower you got. In the US, the typical roads are not really the same as European roads and the cars that were built for these roads seemed to handle well enough. If you put a comparable Euro car on the same roads I think the horsepower would probably win out over handling.

    Just musing. I have no dog in the fight. My all purpose racer was a rebuilt 64 Chevelle with a 396 in it that was well over 400 horse. All the suspension was replaced and the car would dependably slide in corners on asphalt. I'm not sure how much you'd have to spend on a Euro car at the time achieve the same power.
     
  4. 64Strat

    64Strat Friend of Leo's Vendor Member

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    The very latest designs in v-twin race engines use very over-square ratios of bore to stroke and they still make excellent torque.... but I agree with what you are saying. Sort of the farm tractor engine, compared to an F1 engine analogy.
     
  5. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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  6. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    Let's not forget the importance of marketing and competition. The American car industry was selling these various street dragsters very, very well. They had no need or interest in competing with European designs. Americans who wanted European designs could buy them-- look at the vast assortment of European cars that were imported at the time. I don't think the American car makers had any interest in trying to out-Euro the Europeans when they could do perfectly fine selling stuff they already knew how to make.

    Ultimately, it was a big mistake. When the price of gas shot up and emissions controls were imposed the Big 3 were in big trouble. Like the buggy whip industry, they did not pay attention to the future and got punished severely for it. I remember circa 1979 driving like a banshee with my best friend in his little Honda CVCC on snowy roads in Suffolk County, Long Island. That light weight , front wheel drive car could drive rings around everybody and was a total blast, great on gas, etc., etc. It looked just like this, except it was bird-poop green, not yellow:
     

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  7. 64Strat

    64Strat Friend of Leo's Vendor Member

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    Yup! any race prepped trans-am cars or road course cars have dry sump oil systems. My current "fun" car has a 10.5 qt dry sump tank. ;)
     
  8. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Muscle cars didn't handle well. But that's ok, because you don't turn a muscle car at speed. You just kinda throw it, and then control the skid and hope nothing comes apart.

    It's a different kind of fun.
     
  9. 64Strat

    64Strat Friend of Leo's Vendor Member

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    I had a '64 back in the day... it was pretty basic but still quite the machine, the 4 wheel independent suspension didn't hurt.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. August_West

    August_West Tele-Meister

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    This is the correct answer. If you want a hotrod with great handling get yourself a new Corvette C7. More affordable than a vintage classic & 100 times the car (any car from back then).
     
  11. Wallo Tweed

    Wallo Tweed Friend of Leo's

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    I disagree. Cars like Impala SS, and GTOs were coupes or hardtops. No post at the back of doors. A Bel Air was similar to an Impala, but was a sedan with a post. Guys building bracket cars were fond of sedans, cause they were about 100 lbs. lighter. That's the way I remember it anyway.
     
  12. BartS

    BartS Friend of Leo's

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    It's more of a horsepower to weight ratio of the whole car plus how it's geared not the weight engine. The American engines you could slap a super charger bigger and more barrel carbs with an exhaust, cams, bore it over and the works and it could still be a daily driver. Plus they look cool and all that room inside a car is a real luxury.

    I'm not a big muscle car fan. I am a guy so I will admit they are pretty cool. The classic cars I am into are 4 cylinders. You got to get pretty serious with the engineering of them if you want to run them everyday get the HP you want and be able to compete on the 1/4 mile. Yeah I like better handling with good mid top end any day of the week. I wouldn't ever road race. I wouldn't race at all. I still would want people driving big muscle cars to know it would be a cold day in hell before I let your 1965 Pontiac Catalina beat me off the line and if your your going at speeds greater than 65 mph your more likely to do a face plant into a tree no matter what you drive before you would beat me.
     
  13. Brad Pittiful

    Brad Pittiful Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    ah see how important it is to be accurate...i meant coupes not sedans...i was being generic...glad someone else likes to be accurate...so yes...two door models...no b-pillars...even convertibles...but i might also add...the models like the SS and GTO were the top trim lines with all the glitz...you could also get sedans with almost no extras and the big engine just for racing...street or strip...they were the ultimate sleeper...granpas sedan...that could blow the doors off the fancy GTO or SS maybe even corvettes!
     
  14. thunderbyrd

    thunderbyrd Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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  15. bchaffin72

    bchaffin72 Friend of Leo's

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    Depends on where in the US. I grew up in the backwoods of the Rocky Mountains. Lots of extreme hills with tight turns and narrow roads. Things like my Audi or my little 85 Ford EXP two seater had the advantage. On level ground, more straightaways, however, my big cars beat their share of imports.

    That it is. Powerslide, aim in the general direction, and pray. Now THAT'S driving excitement. :D
     
  16. teleamp

    teleamp Poster Extraordinaire

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    AMC Javelin, the one that won SCCA road races.
     
  17. Wallo Tweed

    Wallo Tweed Friend of Leo's

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    It's too much of that gal darn punk rock music, I tell ya!
     
  18. cboutilier

    cboutilier Tele-Afflicted

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    Dad's thing was always to drop the inside front wheel off the shoulder of the road in order to initiate the rear end to slide around. That allowed him to not lose too much ground in the turns against smaller cars like Celicas, and then use his 135+ mph top speed to outrun them in the straights.
     
  19. telleutelleme

    telleutelleme Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    The first one to utilize positraction (limited slip differential) and not straight axles? Must have been a Packard.:lol:
     
  20. Brad Pittiful

    Brad Pittiful Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    no...not enough! :lol:
     
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