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What should I do about my Classic Vibe's neck?

Discussion in 'Squier Tele Forum' started by Cooper, Jan 2, 2021.

  1. fenderchamp

    fenderchamp Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    A guitar isn't an investment, a guitar is something you invest yourself in by playing it, so "throwing money" into a cheap guitar if it helps you as a player, even if you spend more money on the guitar than it costs you or would ever be worth, makes sense.
     
  2. northernguitar

    northernguitar Friend of Leo's

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    Quick question before OP buys the Squier neck. Would it not make more sense to buy something with stronger fretwire to get more years out of the neck?
     
  3. fenderchamp

    fenderchamp Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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  4. Nikman

    Nikman NEW MEMBER!

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    I have spent more than I should have on repairs and modifications on several of my well used and inexpensive guitars.

    Over time I have developed a familiarity with each of those instruments. Spending the money has meant that these instruments have had a new lease of life and I continue to enjoy them.

    I'm left handed and the rarity of the instruments I own swayed me to spend the cash to get them playing better. Their monetary value is minimal and if I ever sell them then the modifications and maintenance will not be recouped but I will have enjoyed them rather than having them sat in a gig bag!

    So I would say get the frets on your CV levelled and have the guitar setup. If the first few frets are really worn through but the rest are ok then it's ok to only replace the really worn ones.

    If you've developed a bond with the instrument then it's perfectly valid to pay someone to keep it going a few more years.
     
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  5. Terrygh1949

    Terrygh1949 Tele-Meister

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    Get the frets redone.
     
  6. dcos

    dcos Tele-Meister

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    Buy a new neck. If the frets are worn out, spend the money to get a neck you like, not to just get by with the one you don't.
     
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  7. Loudog99

    Loudog99 Tele-Holic

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    I say level, crown, and polish the frets yourself (great skill to know). The investment in tools will be minimal, a crowning file is the biggest expense. My rationale is that even if it’s more cost effective to buy a replacement neck, that will also need a level, crown, and polish.

    My current personal guitars have All Parts and Mighty Mite necks, and I’ve used Warmoth on customer builds. All of these have needed fret work, although the Warmoth probably could have been used as is.

    So, you should factor in the cost of new neck plus fret work in your decision.
     
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  8. Vermoulian

    Vermoulian Tele-Meister

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    You may be surprised at the effect of leveling and crowing the existing frets---that process can definitely give new life to a neck even with some pretty significant fret wear. Something I don't think has been mentioned is that if there's a lot of wear on the frets, once they're leveled they will be shorter than they were, which can change the feel of the guitar. It's not necessarily bad, if it matters to you at all. You'll only know if you try it.

    But if that doesn't work for you, I'll take a different position from most: If you like this guitar enough to wear the frets down so much, I think it is reasonable to keep the neck you know and love, as opposed to buying a whole new neck that (a) may not be quite the same, even if it is theoretically to the same "specs" as your current neck, and (b) may still need fret work. So I'd say at least look into getting it refretted. One thing to be aware of is that when refretting a maple fingerboard it is nearly impossible to avoid damaging the finish around the fret slots, so it may be a little more expensive because the fretboard will need to be re-sprayed.

    Ignore advice along the lines of "it's just a Squier; not worth refretting." At the end of the day, the neck is a plank of maple. Maybe Fender or Allparts or Warmoth theoretically uses better wood for their necks, but given the variability of wood, it is entirely possible to get an excellent neck on a Squier and if you have one, you're not going to get any functional difference from a "better" new neck. Also, as far as value goes, given how long you've had this guitar, I'm guessing that marketability or sale price is not an issue for you, and even if it is, with a new neck it's a partscaster so a new neck will not add much if any market value. So you can spend money refretting your current guitar, or you can spend money buying a new neck. One way you know what you're getting; the other way you're rolling dice. The only exception I could see is if you could get another CV neck that you were absolutely sure was the same profile as yours, but things like that can change without warning (although I should say I don't know a whole lot about Squiers).

    So I'd say first, try leveling the existing frets and see how that feels, but if that doesn't solve your problem, in your situation I would definitely entertain refretting your current neck.
     
  9. brashboy

    brashboy Tele-Meister

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    I have the same dilemma. Squier CV 60s thinline mahogany with lots of divots in the frets. I can do a fret level/crown and adjust the nut, but then I have low frets and the frets will still be soft.

    I'm not finding all the great cheap necks other posters keep urging on you. As I write this, Reverb has one CV 60s tele neck for 200. There is ONE on ebay for 170, plus shipping. A number of suppliers like Stratosphere have none; their CV 50s neck is 150 plus shipping. Cheapo necks like allparts are not that great and need a lot of tweaking (better have some crowning and fret-end tools). For that matter, I have NEVER bought a replacement neck that was plug n' play. The action was off, the neck pocket fit was off, needed a neck shim, etc. Always something. It is NOT like replacing an oil filter.

    Everybody rushes to say how it is not economical to replace frets on a Squier neck and how they would never do that. And if you are an inveterate flipper like a lot of folks on this forum, that makes sense. But to me, the question is how much you like the guitar and dig the neck. I adore mine, probably my easiest-playing neck. I'd much rather have a fret job than go through a replacement neck, which will almost always require tweaking. And it's about the same cost, fret job cheaper than a lot of necks. And with a fret job, I'm done, no tweaking or fitting.

    Your neck is just adequate for you, so your analysis may be different. And if you're not that crazy about the guitar, selling is an option; somebody wants it. If it was me and I really wanted to keep the guitar, I would just wait until I found the right neck on ebay, Reverb or whatever. The right one will show up.
     
  10. brashboy

    brashboy Tele-Meister

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    Ah, but you still gotta get the frets OUT, and that usually is where the mischief occurs.
     
  11. brashboy

    brashboy Tele-Meister

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    In my case the fret divots are pretty deep, so a level will remove a lot of material. Then you have really low frets, but the frets are still a really soft alloy. If you gig or play a lot, a fret level is a very temporary fix for a CV with soft frets.

    What really makes the most sense is to refret it one'self using pre-cut frets This is by far the cheapest option.
     
  12. jays0n

    jays0n Tele-Holic

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    I have a Tele from the 80s and the previous owner wore divots in the usual frets/places for their playing and I guess it had also been leveled a number of times. I initially did a light level/crown when i got it but left the divots as the frets were low. But this buzzing you are seeing was killing me when pressing down into those spots and just last night I did a more aggressive level and removed em. It's a little low but still plays fine.

    I agree with the others, do the level/crown yourself to remove the divots and enjoy. Worst case, you end up getting a new neck.

    I'll eventually refret mine with stainless but it is vintage and not a CV.

    Either way, enjoy!

     
  13. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Poster Extraordinaire

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    IMO, the best route for cheap necks with worn out frets is to put them on dedicated slide guitars. Tall, flat, metal nut. Raise the bridge up to match. The frets become your guide lines, as opposed to actually being used as frets, so who cares if they are unevenly worn?

    And if you don't play slide...well now's your great chance to learn, because with your Cheap-O Brand Dedicated Slide Guitar, you don't have to de-tune your regular guitars any longer...and you can just leave it lying around getting banged up, but always within easy reach for impromptu noodlin' around the house. Then, maybe, you'd learn slide.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2021
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  14. gip111

    gip111 TDPRI Member

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    I do my own fret jobs, if I can do it so can you. Fret wire is cheap and all my tools are home brewed. For a fret puller I use end cutting pliers ground flat, a rubber mallet and different files to finish the job. Some fret leveling, fret polishing and the results are very rewarding. I get the job done for under $15. Taking my time I can get it all done in 2-3 hours. I suggest watching some YouTube videos to get an overall idea on how to get it done. I almost forgot, you’ll need a good dose of patience .
     
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  15. bluesfordan

    bluesfordan Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I'm quite fond of my '08 MIC neck. My frets have a good ten years of wear. To me, it would be worth it to refret it once and be done. I doubt if I'd wear out quality steel before I am through. I specifically bought another MIC guitar on how much I like this neck. It has not disappointed.
     
  16. EspyHop

    EspyHop Tele-Holic

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    Replace it.
     
  17. capgun

    capgun Tele-Meister

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    I’m someone that believes the neck IS the guitar. I don’t believe in “tone wood” or maple vs rosewood or any of that. The sound comes from you, your pickups and the signal chain. A whole lot of other things affect your sound way before the slab of wood your neck is bolted to.

    Buy a nice neck you like and bolt it on there. It’s going to sound the same. The feel is what matters here. A bad neck with bad frets doesn’t feel good. The only way a neck ever changes the sound is if you change the scale length.

    Capgun
     
  18. Ghostdriver

    Ghostdriver Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    I have also used three or four of these, no issues whatsoever, as long as you have certain skills to sort them out properly, as you say, nut, fret dress, and yes, they all played fantastically.
     
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  19. nosuch

    nosuch Friend of Leo's

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    If you like the neck and can shell out the money a fret redress or even new frets are the most sustainable options.
     
  20. Maguchi

    Maguchi Tele-Holic

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    4. Have a good luthier refret the existing neck. Least affect on resale value.
     
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