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What should I do about my Classic Vibe's neck?

Discussion in 'Squier Tele Forum' started by Cooper, Jan 2, 2021.

  1. poboy

    poboy Tele-Meister

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    Replacing frets is not that difficult if you have basic shop skills. There's a ton of information on the 'net and you have an ideal neck to learn on since it is not of high value. The basic tools (e.g. end files) are available inexpensively on ebay and you can buy pre-cut fret wire from Fender.
     
    goonie likes this.
  2. Blues Twanger

    Blues Twanger Tele-Afflicted

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    This touches on something I've been saying for quite a while. There is no doubt that the better Squiers are great guitars over the last many years but to keep one running hard for years on end will end up being more expensive than a more expensive guitar would've been in the first place. MIM and MIA need major work less and 'take work's better, and the price of said work is not half of the value of the guitar.

    All this isn't to bash you for buying and liking your CV at all but to point out that if it is an instrument that is well used for many years it doesn't end up any cheaper.
     
    Footsore and Danbgreen like this.
  3. -Hawk-

    -Hawk- Friend of Leo's

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    What a coincidence. I just encountered this issue more or less. I’ll tell you what I did and how I felt about it afterwards. My CV is a 50’s Strat. I probably haven’t played it in two years. For various reasons I decided to pull it out of the case.

    Long story short, I put a fret rocker on it and noticed quite a few high frets, so I decided to level and crown it. I already have the tools. It took less than 90 minutes.

    I was pretty excited to string it up and plug it in. Gotta be honest, it felt like a toy compared to my other guitars. Don’t get me wrong - it’s a “nice” guitar and it plays pretty well, but meh. Compared to my other Strat, it’s just not fair. I put it back in the case.

    I didn’t mind spending the time to level it, but I would have been very disappointed if I’d spent a bunch of money.
     
    SamIV likes this.
  4. Cooper

    Cooper Tele-Holic

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    Wow, thanks for all the replies! Currently leaning toward leveling the frets myself and then re-assessing the situation.

    I totally get what y'all are saying and I don't really disagree. The back story is that I worked in a music store selling Fender guitars for a decade and I happened to get this guitar for free via a Fender promotional deal. During that time I played and owned a LOT of guitars. I know this will sound crazy, but this tele is the best of the bunch. It's true that a side by side comparison with a nicer guitar wouldn't favor this one . . . but for whatever reason, this one's MY guitar. It's my only tele and one of two electrics I own. Fender Original Vintage bridge pickup, GFS Mean 90 in the neck. I sold my American Series and never looked back.

    Thanks for all the knowledge!
     
    Iago and whoanelly15 like this.
  5. posttoastie

    posttoastie Tele-Afflicted

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  6. Cooper

    Cooper Tele-Holic

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    northernguitar and posttoastie like this.
  7. Urshurak776

    Urshurak776 Tele-Afflicted

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    This will be really unpopular, but, you can get one of those vintage amber Chinese necks on eBay for about $40 delivered. A good fret level and dress and nut replacement and they are actually pretty decent. I have one on a partscaster and it plays fantastic. Even had a pro friend play it and he was shocked it was only a $40 neck.
     
  8. drmordo

    drmordo Tele-Afflicted

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    If you don't like the CV neck, why try to save it? IMO any amount of work/money is too much if you don't like the neck in the first place.

    I'd get a MIM neck with the specs I like.
     
  9. Mark the Moose

    Mark the Moose Tele-Afflicted

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    The question is always whether you see a guitar as some kind of investment or something more like a personal artistic vehicle that has intrinsic non monetary value to a particular owner. If it’s the former, I would spend as little as possible maintaining a Squier. If it’s the latter, meaning it plays wonderfully, it inspires you to play and is the instrument you grab every time you walk in the room, well then I would pay a pro to keep it in tip top shape.
     
    Auherre756 and drmordo like this.
  10. Alcohen

    Alcohen Tele-Meister

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    Since you favor this guitar so much, replacing the neck seems like a secondary option after other efforts fail. A new neck might be fine, but it might change the guitar's character, and you like this one.

    You could pay someone to do it who knows what they're doing. Or you could go down the rabbit hole and learn to do it yourself. I did my third level and crown yesterday, and it's been both fun and a valuable education in the finer details of what makes a guitar great. If you end up taking off too much fret, you can go back to Plan B and get a replacement for not too much money.
     
  11. Fenderdad1950

    Fenderdad1950 Tele-Afflicted

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    Allparts necks: $185-$195. Stratosphere neck: $295 (Fender) Warmoth: $300 on up. New Classic Vibe: $399
     
  12. Cooper

    Cooper Tele-Holic

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    Again, thanks for all the replies! I'm now waffling between DIY fret job and investing in a REALLY nice Warmoth neck . . . which then gets into the maple v. rosewood thing . . .
     
  13. beanluc

    beanluc Tele-Holic

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    Really?

    You wouldn't even consider leveling the frets?
     
  14. teletail

    teletail Friend of Leo's

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    If you LOVE everything else about the guitar, buy a new neck. As for selling your old one, good luck selling a 10 year old Squier neck that needs frets. I wouldn't try to "fix" the current neck; you'll put more money into it than it's worth.
     
    capgun and northernguitar like this.
  15. beanluc

    beanluc Tele-Holic

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    Can you say what you mean here? We were only talking about frets and unless the more-expensive guitar came with stainless steel ones in the first place, this is expected on any guitar.
     
  16. beagle

    beagle Friend of Leo's

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    The thing to remember is that even if you get a new neck, it's still going to need fret levelling.
     
    LutherBurger likes this.
  17. Blues Twanger

    Blues Twanger Tele-Afflicted

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    The post is mostly meant as in general, over time it is cheaper to keep a good one going than a cheap one.

    However a couple of things might apply to a fret job on a CV in particular: the heavy vintage tint finish on the neck and fretboard, and the reputation for the frets on these to and other inexpensive Asian guitars to wear more quickly. It isn't Dunlop or Jescar stuff, but less expensive sourced stuff unless I am mistaken.
     
  18. beagle

    beagle Friend of Leo's

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    CVs don't have a thick finish and the frets are no softer than those on MIMs.
     
  19. beanluc

    beanluc Tele-Holic

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    I think he meant the finish color ("heavy tint"), not the thickness.
     
  20. fenderchamp

    fenderchamp Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    just because you play a guitar, doesn't mean you have to buy tools and become a tech, it's a deep rabbit hole to dive down, and setting up a guitar well, especially when it comes to fretwork, takes practice and experience. If you aspire to become a guitar tech fine, but don't start hacking on the frets of guitar you care about. Squires are pretty cheap and all but a classic vibe is about $500 new now, so I wouldn't feel like spending $120 getting the frets dressed and having it setup by a pro would be all that out of line or anything. If you want to spend your time working on guitars and learning how to work on guitar, by all means start doing it, but if you prefer to play your guitar, simply have it fixed.
     
    Mad Kiwi and northernguitar like this.
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