What Key is this progression???

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by koolaide, Jun 29, 2021.

  1. Hpilotman

    Hpilotman Tele-Holic

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    I already know that Bm is the Relative Minor 6th to D Major.
    2 sharps from the circle of fifths at least gives me a starting point to work from somewhere in the D scale.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2021
  2. aadvark

    aadvark Tele-Holic

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    Would be key of G to me.... contains the I, IV and V & ii of G
     
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  3. jbmando

    jbmando Poster Extraordinaire

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    Okay, but you said this: "... it was written in two sharps ## which is the Key of D Major" so I thought I should clear it up a little for those who might not be aware.
     
  4. jbmando

    jbmando Poster Extraordinaire

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    1. No idea what that was.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2021
  5. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Poster Extraordinaire

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    With the transposition you are doing, the verses would be referred to by most as being in G major.

    That's how they would probably be referred to by most musicians in the real world. But the song uses a relative minor/major loop in the verses. It starts out sounding minor, and even when it goes major sounding, it loops back to minor for the next verse. The D turnaround chord at the end of the verse pattern is initially heard as the V of G...until the verse pattern re-starts. Then you realize that it was also a vii, leading back to Em.

    That is the trick that makes the verses have the character that they have. The verses never resolve, in and of themselves. The key is fugitive. The verses occupy the somewhat ambiguous and shifting zone between relative minor and major keys. It isn't until the choruses that the song sounds concretely in the major key – i.e. resolves. In the verses, it is easy to hear each chord, and each melodic phrase, as being in either the major key or the minor key, if you try. When you hit the chorus...it's wham, resolution...and that's why you get the emotional effect you get at that point. Because the verses have kept you pent up and unsure. It's pop singer-songwriting 101.

    This is common...nothing out there. Songs do it all the time, that ambiguous relative major/minor loop that doesn't resolve until a different section of the song.

    For simplicity's sake, we just say it's in G major, because the bulk of the verses "sound" major, and that's where the ultimate resolution is in the song. But it's actually modulating between relative minor and major within each verse. Yes, a switch between relative major and minor is indeed a key change, even though the key signature does not change. But that is rarely notated in the real world. You just call it one or the other key, to make discussion and notation easier.

    Bottom line: The SONG is in G, in the key you're doing it in. The verses are shifting...but you just call them in G.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2021
  6. Troubleandahalf

    Troubleandahalf Tele-Afflicted

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    Why in the world wouldn't you Capo? It sounds beautiful like that, I love to play it.
     
  7. Mark the Moose

    Mark the Moose Tele-Afflicted

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    It's in G, first chord is an Em. Major II or II7 is very common in pop music, like an unresolved V7/V...it is a chromatic chord, not a diatonic chord, meaning it uses a pitch or pitches from outside the key. If you were to notate the melody, you would find the melody frequently returning to the note G, as well as prominently outlining the G triad, lending further credence to G major as the tonic key.
     
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