What is wrong with the compressor coupler?

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by mangus, May 15, 2019.

  1. mangus

    mangus Tele-Meister

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    Hi,
    My dad gave me an old 1999 100l(I think) compressor from Einhell, It's black and I can't read anything on the metal plate that should have the details. Anyway, it works and it has two exits for air... Cutting the long story short the other day the other day I found an unused box of air tools and I tried to connect them to my air compressor but something is wrong as the couplers don't fit.
    I'm pretty sure there must be something I need to buy in order to use this but it's the first time I own a compressor and I'm clueless.. IMG_20190515_101916.jpg IMG_20190515_101943.jpg IMG_20190515_102006.jpg IMG_20190515_102724.jpg IMG_20190515_102746.jpg
    can someone please give me some pointers?
     
  2. mangus

    mangus Tele-Meister

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    Does anyone recognise the model?
     
  3. draggindakota

    draggindakota Tele-Meister

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    What's on your air hose is a male quick connect fitting. What's on the compressor is...something different.

    You need something like this on the compressor side:

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. mangus

    mangus Tele-Meister

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    Quick trip to the shop shown them the pic and problem solved. Thanks
     
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  5. mangus

    mangus Tele-Meister

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    Does anyone know a way I can find out the model of the air compressor?
     
  6. draggindakota

    draggindakota Tele-Meister

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    If you can't read the plate info on the tank, look on the compressor head itself. Usually the compressor head is built by a different company anyway and just packaged onto a tank and branded with whatever brand.
     
  7. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    Generally, the tag fastened to the tank just has info and test data pertaining to the tank itself, not the compressor or info about the output specs.

    The tank tag usually has stuff like the date of manufacture and data about the pressure test that the tank was subjected to in order to gain certification as a pressure vessel.

    Looks like it may be a nice little setup - a 2 cylinder compressor unit :).



    Best Regards,
    Geo.
     
  8. mangus

    mangus Tele-Meister

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    The electric box says Electric motor EM/80 M the cylinder does have a plate on it but it's so rusted I can only make out 100L, made in Italy, Einhell, and 11bar maximum pressure. Oh and 07474 which I think it might be the serial number..
    Regarding the number of cylinders it is a two cylinders with belt and dual outlet and dual pressure gauge. THe interior was mint as it was only used for about two hours during its life time.
    Now, about the Pressure Control Gauge either I can't operate it or I need to replace it which I might considering I suspect it should have something to lubricate and something to remove the water. Am I right?
     
  9. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    There really aren't too many things that go bad on compressor setups, but the pressure control unit would probably be at the top of the list, especially if the unit has been stored in a damp environment.

    The pressure control reads the low p.s.i. at which the unit kicks on in order to build pressure, and then it reads the high p.s.i. at which the unit kicks off.

    There are electrical contacts within the pressure control unit which can become corroded, and possibly not conduct power. It might just need a good cleanup, or if it needs replacing, it's a relatively simple and straight-forward little job. They are not too expensive either.

    As far as lubrication goes, there should be a little "dip-stick" to check the oil level in the crankcase of the compressor unit. There will also be a small threaded plug in the base of the compressor to allow for draining the old used compressor oil. It's always a good idea to maintain good clean compressor oil at the correct level.

    For most of what we (guitar builders and woodworkers) use a compressor for, we are more concerned with removing oil and moisture from the compressed air, rather than adding oil.

    In a mechanics shop where a lot of air tools are used, they sometimes add an oiler to the airline system. In that case, a metered amount of oil is added to the air in order to lubricate the air tools.

    I run a filter that removes moisture and any oil that might be introduced to the air while it undergoes the compression process.

    Having pressurized air in the shop is really handy, and it also opens the door to spraying finishes too :). Good Luck with it!




    Best Regards,
    Geo.
     
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  10. mangus

    mangus Tele-Meister

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    Thanks, I want to use it to keep the shop clean, paint the shop and add a nail gun to build my daughter a playhouse.
    You said something I hadn't thought of before, finishing guitars.. I do have a paint gun that came in a kit but is there anything specific I should use for guitars? like a special nozzle or a good quality gun you'd recommend.
     
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  11. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    I think the most important thing to keep in mind is to try to match the paint gun to the compressor. It doesn't do any good to buy a nice and expensive gun if the compressor can't develop enough air at a sufficient pressure to properly atomize whatever it is that ya want to spray.

    Compressor are generally rated (here in the States) using a standard measurement like cubic feet per minute at either 40 p.s.i. or 90 p.s.i. as a way of rating a compressor's output.

    In your part of the world, they use the much simpler and easier to work with metric system to arrive at a similar rating :).

    There are other folks on the forum that could give you much better advice on specific paint guns than I could; I'm still pretty much an amateur when it comes to spraying finishes.



    I've used the H.F. purple gun quite a bit for spraying motorcycles tins with good results.

    I've also used a couple of smaller H.F. guns for spraying laquers on guitar bodies and necks, with similar good results.

    These are all very inexpensive guns. My best one is what they call a detail gun (an HVLP conversion gun, I believe) that doesn't need a ton of air to operate. I think I paid about $30 bucks or so for it.

    I'm sure one of the more experienced finishers will join in with some spray gun suggestions for you, some thing that's available on your side of the Pond :).




    Best Regards,
    Geo.
     
  12. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire

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    You might also post this question in the Finely Finished sub-forum since it's devoted to finishing guitars. Folks in there may have more specific info for you.
     
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  13. mangus

    mangus Tele-Meister

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    Thanks
     
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  14. mangus

    mangus Tele-Meister

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    So, this problem was solved, then tightening the new coupler the casting broke. as it had two I epoxied the air passage from the first to the broken one and now I have a new problem, the airline keeps breaking at the end where the coupler (that afterwards engages on the air thingy pistol) enters it. What is the correct way to introduce the coupler without forcing the plastic airline? should i use some oil to lubricate or heat to make it the airline softer?
     
  15. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    For the smaller compressors that we might use in our shop or garage, there are 3 different diameters (inside diameter) of air hose commonly used here in the U.S. - 1/4", 3/8", and sometimes 1/2", and they generally each use brass or steel "barbed end" fittings sized to match the hose.

    The ends of the fitting that couple up with each other are pretty standard and will usually interchange with each other regardless of size, but the "barbed end" of the fitting that goes into the hose end is sized to fit the hose diameter.
    I hope I'm explaining this so it makes sense :).

    It looks like you have one of the "coily" plastic air lines - probably 1/4" or 6mm. Those skinny plastic lines are usually pretty hard when new, and they get harder as they age. I had one of those and after awhile it just got hard and kept breaking, so I chucked it ;).

    You might first double-check to make sure the fitting is sized for the small hose; trying to fit that type of hard hose over a too-big fitting is probably not going to happen.

    If it looks like the hose and fitting are compatible, giving the hose end a little soak in hot water might give it enough elasticity to slip on :).

    If you end up buying another hose, 3/8" diameter is a pretty good option. It's a bit bulkier than 1/4", but it will pass a far greater volume of air, which often becomes a concern with many air tools.




    Best Regards,
    Geo.
     
  16. mangus

    mangus Tele-Meister

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    And now i have another issue with it the casted metal part cracked and it won't stop hissing, as I suspect I have to replace it I have a big problem the new pressure switches are threaded inside, but mine connects to something like this:
    compressor.PNG
    can it be removed from the cannister and replaced with a 1/4 threaded fitting that can connect to a new power switch with ports to which I can connect the pressure gauge, pressure control gauge, emergency valve and quick coupler?
     
  17. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    If I understand correctly, the short answer is yes, with one caveat - I'd use a fitting that matches the diameter of the corresponding port on the pressure switch - if it's larger than 1/4", match it.



    On the smaller compressor setups similar to yours, the following usually holds true:

    The pressure switches generally have four pipe thread ports (one to the tank, one to the regulator assembly, one for a pressure gauge, and one that will use a smaller diameter line that takes compression fittings which runs to a "T" fitting in the supply line that runs from the compressor to the holding tank.

    The pressure switch will also have a set of contact points to connect the wiring from the mains, as well as a set of contact points to connect the wiring to the motor.

    Usually, ya don't use any quick connect fittings until ya get past the regulator, where you'd normally install a female quick connect so you can connect your rubber air line. The female quick connect on the regulator will accept the male quick connect fitting on your rubber airline - a fitting just like the one you picture in your last post.

    I think that will be the easiest and simplest way to plumb your setup; it's the same way that the small air compressors usually come from the factory. It also allows you to mount male quick connects on your air tools and accessories.

    If you happen to run into any snags, maybe you could post up a picture or two of the parts you need to fit together; no doubt we can come up with a suggestion that will work for ya :).






    Best Regards,
    Geo.
     
  18. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    If you haven't already seen this tip, every time you use the compressor you should drain the water out of the tank. As the air is compressed it loses its ability to hold moisture, so water condenses inside the tank. There will be a valve at the bottom of the tank (not the one where you drain the oil from the compressor cylinders) that you need to open after you shut down the compressor in order to drain out the water, which sprays out as a mist. First you can drain the bulk of the air from the tank using a nozzle (on modern compressors there's a safety relief valve with a ring you can pull and it will let most of the air out, not sure yours would have one of those gadgets).

    If you're going to run a nail gun or a sprayer, you'll want a hose that's larger than 1/4"; 3/8" is pretty standard. Vinyl hoses are the least expensive and the most ornery in cold weather. Rubber ones hold up well in the cold and you'll see them in use at commercial auto repair garages. There are new designs of very flexible soft hoses that are fantastic for occasional use around the house because you don't have to wrestle with them or trip over the coils because they lay flat on the floor - however the new soft hoses are not as durable for a real work site.

    Also, as for hoses, get one longer than you think you need. Compressors don't like to be run off of extension cords they'll hog all the power they can get, so think in terms of extending the hose and not the power cord when you work on that outdoor playhouse.

    Nail guns, like compressors, have cylinders with rings in them that like to be lubricated. For nailers you usually put a drop or two of oil in the air inlet before hooking up the hose for a day's work. You will find the newest models of staplers and nailers available in an oil-free configuration. Whether it's an oil free nailer or an oil free compressor, there will be plastic piston rings that wear and are a maintenance/service part you may need to buy down the road.
     
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