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What is this grain pattern on my maple neck?

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by Clickfiend, Sep 23, 2020.

  1. Viceroy

    Viceroy Tele-Meister

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    There is actually disagreement among sawyers and I have seen so-called quarter sawn scenarios described and rift sawn and vice versa. Between 60° and 90° is acceptable in the industry as quarter sawn. The proof is in the end product, how vertical is the grain? and are the medullary RAYS, not RINGS, showing?
     
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  2. Clickfiend

    Clickfiend TDPRI Member

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    That’s so cool. Thanks so much for all the info. I got the neck off ebay for less than a hundred bucks when I was doing a pretty much complete rebuild of my affinity tele. Serial makes it a 2014. I’ve always wondered about this cool pattern that kind of shifts in different light. The fit and finish are also awesome and it plays great. Rebuild consisted of the neck, USA vintage tuners, PV ‘64 PUPS, Fender control plate & knobs, CTS pots, OG 4 way switch, SC jack, and cloth wiring w/ treble bleed. It’s hard to put down.

    It’s the butterscotch in the middle:
    8F1AF8FC-FBDB-4561-A09E-F90456BA9DDA.jpeg
     
  3. Greggorios

    Greggorios Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Is this the same thing? It runs the length of the neck and I've always liked it.

    upload_2020-9-23_19-2-51.jpeg
     
  4. TwangBrain

    TwangBrain Tele-Meister

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    Nice!!! Quartersawn necks are a treat!
     
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  5. Boreas

    Boreas Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I guess that is not the same as Tiger Stripe??
     
  6. rmfrance

    rmfrance TDPRI Member

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    My CV50s BB has exactly that grain pattern, which might not be as exotic-looking as bird's-eye or flamed maple, BUT I'm convinced that it's really stable and accounts to the natural sustain of mine. I regard it as a bonus.
     
  7. Dana Rudd

    Dana Rudd Tele-Holic

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    Beautiful neck. Great discussion in this thread, learned a lot. Thanks for the information. Now I have to go look at my Fender necks. :D
     
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  8. Marblatx

    Marblatx TDPRI Member

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    I've been wondering that myself. My SX has that same pattern.
     
  9. Robert Graf

    Robert Graf TDPRI Member

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    Maybe, but probably not. What you're seeing is most likely what is called bees' wing. There's also a pattern called blister, and even a quilt. In some of the mahogany trees, the weight of the tree crushes the grain in the bole, leading to some really spectacular patterns, especially in the much denser Cuban mahogany. In general, the rays in mahogany are too small to see. If they are visible, then it's likely not not Honduras mahogany. The wood is quartersawn in the picture, but I think you're looking at wild grain, and not the rays, as evidenced by the fact that the appearance is more pronounced at the base of the headstock, but not in the rest of the neck or headstock.
     
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  10. Robert Graf

    Robert Graf TDPRI Member

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    Offhand, I'd say it's called Sycamore. Those are the medullary rays, and the rays on maple are not as long on maple as they are on Sycamore. The rays on Sycamore tend to vary from a pattern they call lace to the pattern you see.
     
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  11. Robert Graf

    Robert Graf TDPRI Member

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    That sure as heck looks like Sycamore to me. Quite typical of Sycamore, which is quite often quartersawn.
     
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  12. Robert Graf

    Robert Graf TDPRI Member

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    The main reason for quartersawing was that the stock was riven by wainwrights for wagon spokes, and they wanted to avoid the weakness of grain runout. Quartersawn wood for Les Paul necks is not really such a good idea, nor is the use of mahogany.
     
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  13. skradlee

    skradlee TDPRI Member

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    Wow, your JMJM neck is crazy flamey like mine. Is yours by chance a 2015?
     
  14. Robert Graf

    Robert Graf TDPRI Member

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    Tiger stripe, in maple, is generally referred to as fiddleback, as seen on many Les Paul tops. Some people also call it a flame pattern.
     
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  15. Robert Graf

    Robert Graf TDPRI Member

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    There is no clearly defined industry any more, as the number of machines to mill lumber ever increases. In general, nobody pays much attention because nobody is making wooden wagon spokes. The main market for quartered lumber is architectural and furniture, so the prominence of the grain is what matters. As for riftsawn, in general that is for baluster grade lumber.
     
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  16. Broadcasted

    Broadcasted TDPRI Member

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    here's a great video of a miller explaining how he gets the different types of cuts....he appears to be using "Flat Sawing" but can get Rift, Quarter and Flat sawn pieces....

    I know that both Rift and Quartersawn are "premium" pieces of lumber but is Quartersawn the best for guitar necks?....Most Fender masterbuilts i see have Quartersawn while the team builds list rift.....would that be an accurate assessment....that Quartersawn is a "step up" from rift?...or is it vice versa...that rift is actually more desirable?
     
  17. Hounded Dog

    Hounded Dog TDPRI Member

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    Necking. I never get tired of it!
     
  18. Henley

    Henley Tele-Holic

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    Probably depends on who you ask. Here is a quote from John Suhr:

    “Maple has diffuse pores in its grain structure, so as far as stability is concerned, it does not have more flex in one direction over another. Most vintage instruments were Flat Sawn, simply because of the availability of wood in the ’50s and ’60s. A byproduct of this is there are plenty of people who feel Flat Sawn sounds better or feels better than Quarter Sawn. There are also people who feel that Quarter Sawn is punchier, and some companies are praised for using straight Quarter Sawn lumber on their necks. My opinion after building guitars for 40 years is there is basically zero difference. Quarter Sawn has a slight advantage in that it is more dimensionally stable in the width direction. However, we dry our wood very carefully so this is not an issue. With roasted maple, none of it matters. Flat Sawn will also show more figuring on the side of the neck if it is for instance flame maple. Some builders exclusively use Flat Sawn, and others only use Quarter Sawn. Since I have no opinion that one is better than the other, we have decided to now offer both options on Custom builds.”
    https://www.suhr.com/quarter-sawn-vs-flat-sawn-maple-necks/
     
  19. Slap Axe

    Slap Axe Tele-Meister

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    Those are tone lines bro...that’s where the tone in tone woods resides.
     
  20. ponce

    ponce Tele-Afflicted

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    It's probably the most stable of the grain orientations on a neck, but I kind of dislike that appearance on maple, god forbid on a spruce soundboard.

    unnamed (2).jpg
     
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