What is the advantage of a pine Telecaster?

teletimetx

Doctor of Teleocity
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I'm thinking pine might not be that good, tone-wise.

Might want to read this thread.

I don’t have a dog in that hunt, btw. Just enjoy working with pine.

Perhaps you meant “I’m thinking pine might not be that good for me”

Despite any number of experiences you can read about to the contrary in this thread.
 

joe.attaboy

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OK, time to 'fess up on a major snafu on my part.

When I responded to this thread a couple of days ago, I posted a photo of what I thought was my pine partscaster, which is actually an Esquire clone, not a Tele clone. I was posting in the middle of Ira passing through here, so maybe the TS-level winds were blowing through my brain at the time. I had searched my photos and grabbed one of what I thought was the pine guitar. That photo was actually an SX ash Tele clone that I photographed after doing some electronics mods this summer.

So, as a mea culpa and for full disclosure...

THIS is the pine Esquire partscaster:

IMG_20221001_112958.jpg
IMG_20221001_113015.jpg
IMG_20210819_182902.jpg


The top two images show it as it is today. The bottom photo shows the original neck, which I accidentally drilled through and had plugged by my woodworker BIL (you can see the plug at the 17th fret on the low side).

Both necks were Mighty Mites, and I actually liked the new one better. The pine body was from nomoonlaser on eBay, Mighty Mite neck, Hipshot tuners, Gotoh Vintage bridge, electronics from Dave Starr, Bootstrap custom wound pup, Fender control plate, knobs, strap buttons, Electrosocket jack, Musiclilly aged white PG.

This was my first build (hence the hole drilled in the first neck - had to screw up the most expensive part, right?) and I stand by the original reply - looks and sounds bitchin'.

My apologies for the screw up, especially to those of you who liked the original post. The skies here are blue and cloud-free today.
 

joe.attaboy

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thanks for asking.. No, none.. when a hurricane comes across the state like that.. it rarely causes much more than a bad rain day where we are..

r
Yep, about the same here in Fleming Island. Cleaning up a lot of branches, twigs and leaves. Similar to past storms. I know you're closer to the beaches, so glad things were ok.
 

76standard

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keizer oregon
I see some builders like Ron Kirn offering a pine Tele. I think that Leo started with pine before switching to Ash / Alder. How do they sound?
I think part of the fascination of a pine bodied guitar is the presumed lighter weight, and improvements in it sonic voice, from its more common counterparts of ash and alder. It makes for a gorgeous cosmetic look, though. If you don't mind the inherit dings and scratches that come with a softer wood, then by all means, go for it.

To me the two most important organic parts of any guitar are the body and neck. So, if you are not particular about wood types for the body, and don't mind those battle scars of use--OBTW its going to happen if you USE the guitar, especially if you gig with it--I think a pine body is just fine. My Tele (pics attached) has an 4.6 pound, two piece, Alder body, and it is a wonderful sounding guitar. Since I have never played a pine body guitar, I cannot give a side-by-side comparison of Alder versus Pine. I will trust those on this forum with knowledge about pine body guitars.
 

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Sax-son

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I can't really agree with that. I've had enough guitars and put together enough partscasters to conclude that all of the parts matter to the tone.
Yeah, me too! I have guitars built from all kinds of different tone woods and they all sound a little different, so it does matter. In addition, like you said, all the parts that come together in order to culminate the tone. I have had several guitars in which I have had to mix, match, and remix and match necks and pickups and bridge choices before I got to a point where I was satisfied. Some of my plans looked good on paper but didn't come together as they I had anticipated. It's all in the final recipe!

For the record, I have a Pinecaster that I really like. However, I would never choose pine over alder. Pine is just another choice that is available to you if you want it, but not necessarily a better choice.
 
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DM1975inKS

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I have no idea if pine makes a good sounding guitar or not but there are some mighty fine looking axes in this thread.
 

Brent Hutto

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Sometimes, you have to sacrifice the groovy pine grain for your favorite solid color of the month:

View attachment 1035658
I guess years of playing only acoustic instruments made me a tonewood snob. I look at a Pinecaster or most guitars with the flame maple veneer or even some highly figure Ash bodies and mentally compare them to a perfectly bookmatched piece of Spruce with tight grain and silking. I always wonder why they didn't just paint over the wood since it doesn't match my (acoustic) ideal for grain pattern.

I find that especially so when it's a Tele or Strat with a solid color plastic pickguard. Solid pickguard seems to cry out for a solid paint job on the body, for my taste. If you really want to show off the grain go with a no-pickguard design.
 

Sax-son

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I guess years of playing only acoustic instruments made me a tonewood snob. I look at a Pinecaster or most guitars with the flame maple veneer or even some highly figure Ash bodies and mentally compare them to a perfectly bookmatched piece of Spruce with tight grain and silking. I always wonder why they didn't just paint over the wood since it doesn't match my (acoustic) ideal for grain pattern.

I find that especially so when it's a Tele or Strat with a solid color plastic pickguard. Solid pickguard seems to cry out for a solid paint job on the body, for my taste. If you really want to show off the grain go with a no-pickguard design.
I have found that many here on this forum have their own tastes and like something different from mine or what I would choose.

In the subject of tone wood with acoustics, that is a whole different ballgame. For years, I was dismissive of mahogany in acoustic guitars. I had a 00 sized body Gibson acoustic that was all mahogany. For the most part, that guitar was completely tone dead. I thought to myself, why would somebody build an acoustic guitar from this $%^&?

Fast forward 50 years and I took a chance and purchased an all-mahogany Taylor GS mini. A beautiful sounding guitar and about the same size, so obviously not all guitars are designed to same when it comes to tone. You just can't paintbrush an opinion on various species of wood. They are all different.
 

Wrighty

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Never been a fan of 'naked' guitars. It's a subjective thing but to me they look somehow unfinished, especially pine, which looks like something you'd pick up in a cookware shop.
 

orangeguitar

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If you're planning on doing a pine partscaster, be careful with the drill and tools in general. It is so soft that you can practically press the pickguard screw holes in with a pencil instead of needing a drill.
 




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