What is the advantage of a pine Telecaster?

Maguchi

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When installing screws in "softwoods", you use a slightly smaller drill bit than you normally would for dense " hardwoods". Screw stripping is caused by over torquing by the user, The wrong size screw, or thread pitch, not the material or the screw. You can look up the specifications in an engineer's manual. All these cheap pawlonia bodies would have the same problem if it was the wood's fault. I suspect it is internet BS.


Yes, agreed, user error. One half of the many guitarists I know are guitar tech savvy, and the other half are players only and clueless about tech issues like pilot hole diameter and too much torque. IMHO softer wood is less user friendly and makes user error more likely than hardwood. YMMV
 
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strat54

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That thing is amazing.

All these Oaks they planted here in Atlanta after the Civil War are massive now and coming down one by one each time it rains.

I think it's time for the city to harvest them all and plant something new.

In this part of GA we have a lot more copperheads than rattlers. A copperhead version in the cards maybe?
Thanks for the compliment:)
I live in Lilburn and one of my hobbies is catching snakes so I have caught plenty of copperheads over the years. I will probably get into a copperhead design once I get my home woodworking shop back together again after some wall construction and remodeling:mad: I have to finish the baby gator design for this orange body first though. I may insert the detailed design into the guitar by way of a 3D printed relief. It paints up great and you can't tell the difference between it and a wood routed relief...only the detail in the 3D print is even better than routing it in a hardwood. The gator design if for my daughter-in-law.
Lily design- A body.jpg
 

Beebe

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Thanks for the compliment:)
I live in Lilburn and one of my hobbies is catching snakes so I have caught plenty of copperheads over the years. I will probably get into a copperhead design once I get my home woodworking shop back together again after some wall construction and remodeling:mad: I have to finish the baby gator design for this orange body first though. I may insert the detailed design into the guitar by way of a 3D printed relief. It paints up great and you can't tell the difference between it and a wood routed relief...only the detail in the 3D print is even better than routing it in a hardwood. The gator design if for my daughter-in-law. View attachment 1035140

Look at that lil baby gator!! She's going to love it.
 

Smitty088

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I see some builders like Ron Kirn offering a pine Tele. I think that Leo started with pine before switching to Ash / Alder. How do they sound?
I’ve owned a couple of pine body teles by LSL guitars. They sound great kind of cross between ash and alder to my ears plus they’re light! You should try before you buy though as wood varies. In the pic below is the pine LSL. The Gene Baker DAngelico came in at the same time. That‘s my receiving mgr LOL.
 

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twangster6

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They can be lightweight...though not always. There are different kinds of pine. How dried out it is plays a role too. I have a couple that are lightweight and very resonant. They feel almost alive against you...not as much as an acoustic or an archtop, but more than a typical electric. The grain patterns and knots can be very beautiful. God's handiwork, I like to say, with some shaping and finishing touches by man. I have many pictures of pine (and other) teles that I use as screensavers.
how dry is the primary factor in the sound quality
 

2HBStrat

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A friend has the Blackguard book and I skimmed the pages. Not sure if there's anything in there or not about pine bodied guitars and Leo switching to ash early on. Although the Forrest White book below is older, it's very good too. And White also writes about Fender switching to ash because pine was too soft.

IMHO the older books and the ones written by the principles like Forrest White are closer to the source and the history than newer books. After all, the excerpt I cited and the topic of this thread is "advantage of a pine Telecaster" and "Leo started with pine before switching to ash." And pine bodies were initially made and stopped being made by Fender in 1950.
Yeah, that's pretty early in the history of Fender. It didn't take Leo very long to discard pine.
 

Maguchi

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There IS no advantage to a pine bodied Tele. Leo tried pine and ended up rejecting it.

Pine is typically viewed as a lesser wood - right or wrong. As ash and other hardwoods have become harder to come by, pine and spruce and fir feel like good alternatives.

Yeah, that's pretty early in the history of Fender. It didn't take Leo very long to discard pine.
Yes, I suppose availability of different wood types has changed in the 72 years since the Tele was introduced. Swamp ash is scarce these days due to the shifting of the banks of the Mississippi River. Also the boring beatles have cut into the availability of swamp ash. So with other woods not being as available in 2022, guitar builders are taking a second look at soft woods like pine and paulownia and starting to use it for guitar bodies.
 
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orangeguitar

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I have a few guitars built from Rosser bodies. He offers some nice options that others don't go near. All of those guitars are some of my favorites in my arsenal.
I really like mine a lot. It ended up weighing less than 4 pounds, too, and the guitar as it is now only weighs 6lbs13oz. I generally like a guitar to be somewhat light but this one feels featherweight.
 

Galen1960

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Pine guitars sound awesome. Very resonant and lightweight. However Leo Fender stopped using pine early on because pine is a soft wood and would dent and ding too easily. Also screw holes would strip out after awhile. I prefer swamp ash and alder.

Excerpt from page 11:
View attachment 1034435 View attachment 1034440
Could you post a photo of the foreward?
 

Maguchi

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Stratocast

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I see some builders like Ron Kirn offering a pine Tele. I think that Leo started with pine before switching to Ash / Alder. How do they sound?
if Pine is heavier than ash or Alder ? I'm all in!.. give me a nice 10 to 12 pound Tele.. any day... but if Pine.. floats in the wind.. like birch you can keep it...
 

Stratocast

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Wood doesn't matter to tone. Pickups and the Pots 'n Caps do matter. There are many other benefits to choosing pine though.

Here's a pine guitar body with a pine neck without a truss-rod.


Tone... ?.. yeah I guess that is important to many... I just want a guitar that weighs.. like an anchor... and if it has good tone as well?... that's a double plus...
 

trev333

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what's it matter if you get some playing wear on a guitar?....that's what happens...

this is DF or WRC ?.... 4.5 lb bodies... perfect...

using Pine for a body means you don't give a toss about "tonewoods"...

believe me.. everyone who has played this guitar from rock stars to school kids wanted to keep it... it sounds effen great...:lol:

pine marks on tele.JPG
 

rockinstephen

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Advantage? None, really, although the grain pattern is very pretty through a sunburst finish. Pine is very soft and easily dented. I have a Modern Player Tele. It's HEAVEY - 8.6 lbs, but some of that may be due to the Bigsby I added. We may see more pine bodies as alternative tone woods are sought after. I have yet to be convinced that the type of wood makes much if any difference in a solid body electric guitar, but I could be wrong...
Some more than others. One of mine, finished in Tru Oil, smells amazing up close. The pine scent is strong with that one.
 

joe.attaboy

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the true advantage of ANY wood is in the desire of the guitarist to own a guitar made of it.. that's it...

While I have made hundreds of them in varying degrees ranging from completely clear to as gnarly as can be imagined..I can tell ya, they all sounded great, . . . . in the hands of a good guitarist, and all had the possibility of sounding great in the hands of a rank amateur who was dedicated and practiced religiously..

rock on..
Sounds great? Check.
Rank amateur? Multiple Check.
Dedicated, practiced regularly? Well, one check for now.

Ron, hope you had no Ian issues over there.
 




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